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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 12, 2019


Not silent at all
The so-called 'silent' or 'synonymous' genetic alterations do not result in altered proteins.
UMBC research decodes plant defense system, with an eye on improving farming and medicine
The plant circadian clock determines when certain defense responses are activated (often timed with peak activity of pests), and compounds used in defense affect the clock.
Physics at the edge
In 2005, condensed matter physicists Charles Kane and Eugene Mele considered the fate of graphene at low temperatures.
Sweating for science: A sauna session is just as exhausting as moderate exercise
Your blood pressure does not drop during a sauna visit - it rises, as well as your heart rate.
Gut microbes respond differently to foods with similar nutrition labels
Foods that look the same on nutrition labels can have vastly different effects on our microbiomes, report researchers in a paper publishing June 12 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.
Sickle cell disease needs more attention
Article signed by researchers affiliated with institutions in the US, UK, Ghana and Brazil highlights recent progress in diagnosis and treatment but warns that more screening of newborns is needed.
IDIBELL-researchers negatively correlate a neuropeptide with executive functions
Researchers from IDIBELL and the group of Eating Disorders, of the HUB, led by Dr.
Hybrid nanostructure steps up light-harvesting efficiency
Energy is transferred through the structure in a way that boosts its response to light, showing promise for solar cell applications.
Farmer researchers reap more benefits than just increased crop production
Participants in research are motivated by learning, teaching opportunities.
Cancer survival rates in the young show inconsistent progress
A new study in JNCI Cancer Spectrum finds that dramatic increases in cancer survival in adolescents and young adults are undermined by continuing disparities by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.
National Poll: Daddy shaming happens too
For over a quarter of fathers polled, criticism made them feel less confident as a parent and 1 in 5 say it discourages them from being more involved in parenting.
Low-dose prednisolone significantly improves pain symptoms and function in hand osteoarthritis
The results of the low-dose prednisolone in patients with hand osteoarthritis (HOPE) study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) show that low-dose prednisolone significantly improves pain and function in patients with painful hand osteoarthritis.
Nuclear pore complex outer rings: No longer 'one size fits all'
In eukaryotic cells, molecules can only move into or out of the nucleus through specialized channels called nuclear pore complexes (NPCs).
More men undergo plastic surgery as the daddy-do-over trend rises in popularity
Just as women can turn to a suite of procedures, known as the 'Mommy Makeover,' more men are embracing their own set of treatments, the 'Daddy Do-Over,' to boost their confidence and improve their physical appearance.
Binary solvent mixture boosting high efficiency of polymer solar cells
CB, CF and their mixture were selected as solvents to regulate molecular order and the nanoscale morphology of the photoactive layer.
Pre-qualifying education and training helps health workers tackle gender based violence
Gender-based violence (GBV) could be tackled more effectively by giving healthcare students wider and more practical education and training in identifying and responding to the 'warning signs' presented among patients they will encounter in professional life, according to a new study.
Community pharmacies make a lifestyle impact for patients with prostate cancer
Cardiovascular health and physical activity levels of prostate cancer patients improve following successful interventions by community pharmacies, new research in the British Medical Journal reports.
Body composition shown to affect energy spent standing versus sitting
A person's body composition could influence the difference between the amount of energy they spend while sitting versus standing, according to new research published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.
New Cochrane Review assesses evidence on ways to reduce consumption of sugary drinks
Consumption of sugary drinks is considered to be a key driver behind the global obesity epidemic, and is linked with tooth decay, diabetes and heart disease.
The atmosphere of a new ultra hot Jupiter is analyzed
The combination of observations made with the CARMENES spectrograph on the 3.5m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Almería), and the HARPS-N spectrograph on the National Galileo Telescope (TNG) at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma) has enabled a team from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and from the University of La Laguna (ULL) to reveal new details about this extrasolar planet, which has a surface temperature of around 2000 K.
Construction kit for custom-designed products
Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines.
Gout patients suffer in silence with low expectations of treatment
The results of a 14 country pan-European survey presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) suggest gout is being diagnosed late, is not well controlled, and is not regularly monitored.
Honeybee mite raises bumblebee virus risk
A mite that spreads a dangerous virus among honeybees also plays an indirect role in infecting wild bumblebees, new research shows.
WVU and NIOSH study ways to prevent lung disease in dentistry professionals
Inhaling dangerous particulates is a hazard of coal mining, mold remediation, sandblasting ... and dentistry.
Eliminating infamous security threats
Speculative memory side-channel attacks like Meltdown and Spectre are security vulnerabilities in computers.
Baby pterodactyls could fly from birth
A breakthrough discovery has found that pterodactyls, extinct flying reptiles also known as pterosaurs, had a remarkable ability -- they could fly from birth.
Opioid alternative? Taming tetrodotoxin for precise painkilling
Alternatives to opioids for treating pain are sorely needed. A study in rats suggests that tetrodotoxin, properly packaged, offers a safe pain block.
Norovirus structures could help develop treatments for food poisoning
Researchers at CSHL used cryo-EM and computational tools to reconstruct the shell structures of four different strains of human noroviruses.
Large summer 'dead zone' forecast for Chesapeake Bay after wet winter and spring
Ecologists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and the University of Michigan are forecasting a large Chesapeake Bay 'dead zone' in 2019 due to well-above-average river flows associated with increased rainfall in the watershed since last fall.
Mouse study finds BPA exposure has transgenerational effects on gene linked to autism
Transgenerational bisphenol A (BPA) exposure may contribute to autism, according to a mouse study published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrinology.
Weighing risks and benefits of drug treatment for major depression
For some people, medication is an effective part of treatment for depression.
The benefits of being different
Six different color morphs of the elusive Asiatic golden cat have been discovered in Northeast India -- with the findings being hailed as 'an evolutionary puzzle' -- as the world's greatest number of different colored wild cat species in one area are reported.
New web-based tool accelerates research on conditions such as dementia, sports concussion
A new new cloud-computing web platform created by scientists in the United States, Europe and South America will allow researchers to track data and analyses on the brain, potentially reducing delays in discovery.
Bacteria such as E. coli detected in minutes by new technology from Warwick University
University of Warwick scientists have discovered that healthy bacteria cells and cells inhibited by antibiotics or UV light show completely different electric reactions.
'Five star' hospitals often provide fewer services than other hospitals, new data suggests
If you're looking for a top-notch hospital with a wide range of services, narrowing your list to hospitals with a five-star patient experience rating might lead you astray.
Study shows more effective method for detecting prostate cancer
Each year, 1 million men in the US undergo biopsies for prostate cancer.
Breathing new life into dye-sensitized solar cells
Japanese researchers are poised to reboot the field of aromatic-fused porphyrin sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells, the most efficient solar efficient solar technology available at present.
A heart failure drug to treat leukemia: A promising new therapeutic approach
Researchers followed their intuition that a drug initially intended for heart failure could be effective in treating cancer.
The Wikipedia gender gap
In a recent University of Washington study, researchers interviewed women 'Wikipedians' to examine the lack of female and non-binary editors in Wikipedia.
Why fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence
Researchers say fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence.
New evidence shows crash with Antlia 2 gave the Milky Way the ripples in its outer disc
The newly-discovered dark dwarf galaxy Antlia 2's collision with the Milky Way may be responsible for our galaxy's characteristic ripples in its outer disc, according to a study led by Rochester Institute of Technology Assistant Professor Sukanya Chakrabarti.
Protecting coral reefs in a deteriorating environment
A new report examines novel approaches for saving coral reefs imperiled by climate change, and how local decision-makers can assess the risks and benefits of intervention.
Using gene editing, neuroscientists develop a new model for autism
Using the genome-editing system CRISPR, researchers at MIT and in China have engineered macaque monkeys to express a gene mutation linked to autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders in humans.
The origins of cannabis smoking: marijuana use in the first millennium BC
Cannabis has been cultivated as an oil-seed and fiber crop for millennia in East Asia.
First blood-brain barrier chip using stem cells developed by Ben-Gurion University researchers
''By combining organ-chip technology and human iPSC-derived tissue, we have created a neurovascular unit that recapitulates complex BBB functions, provides a platform for modeling inheritable neurological disorders, and advances drug screening, as well as personalized medicine,'' Ben-Gurion University researcher Dr.
Inexpensive, simple fabrication method poised to expand microlens applications
A growing number of applications, including smartphone cameras, depend on microlenses to boost performance.
Old ice and snow yields tracer of preindustrial ozone
Using rare oxygen molecules trapped in old ice and snow, US and French scientists have answered a long-standing question: How much have 'bad' ozone levels increased since the start of the Industrial Revolution?
Overdose, suicide among leading reasons for deaths of new moms
Overdoses and suicides were among the most common reasons for mothers dying within a year of giving birth in California, according to a new study from Michigan State University and the University of California, Merced.
Organic carbon hides in sediments, keeping oxygen in atmosphere
A new study from researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Harvard University may help settle a long-standing question--how small amounts of organic carbon become locked away in rock and sediments, preventing it from decomposing.
New study shows legacy of DDT to lake ecosystems
New findings of a multi-university research team show the pesticide DDT persists in remote lakes at concerning levels half a century after it was banned, affecting key aquatic species and potentially entire lake food webs.
New tool can pinpoint origins of the gut's bacteria
A UCLA-led research team has developed a faster and more accurate way to determine where the many bacteria that live in, and on, humans come from.
Discovery of field-induced pair density wave state in high temperature superconductors
Superconductors are quantum materials that are perfect transmitters of electricity and electronic information.
Kids with headache after stroke might be at risk for another stroke
A new study has found a high incidence of headaches in pediatric stroke survivors and identified a possible association between post-stroke headache and stroke recurrence.
Community knowledge can be as valuable as ecological knowledge in environmental decision-making
An understanding of community issues can be as valuable as knowing the ecology of an area when making environmental decisions, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School.
Jupiter-like exoplanets found in sweet spot in most planetary systems
A survey of 300 stars in search of exoplanets finds that massive, Jupiter-like gas giants are found just about where Jupiter is in our own solar system.
Adults with sleep apnea are more likely to experience involuntary job loss
Recently unemployed people with undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea have a higher risk of having lost a job multiple times, according to preliminary results from a new study.
Epilepsy drugs linked to increased risk of suicidal behavior, particularly in young people
Treatment with gabapentinoids -- a group of drugs used for epilepsy, nerve pain and anxiety disorders -- is associated with an increased risk of suicidal behavior, unintentional overdose, injuries, and road traffic incidents, finds a study from Sweden published by The BMJ today.
How the cell protects itself
The cell contains transcripts of the genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell.
Ancient pots from Chinese tombs reveal early use of cannabis as a drug
Chemical analysis of several wooden braziers recently excavated from tombs in western China provides some of earliest evidence for ritual cannabis smoking, researchers report.
Table salt compound spotted on Europa
New insight on Europa's geochemistry was hiding in the visible spectrum.
Pollen collected by US honey bees in urban settings shows dramatic seasonal variation
The diversity and availability of pollen foraged by honey bees across urban and suburban areas in the US varies drastically with the seasons, according to a study published June 12, 2019 in PLOS ONE by Juliana Rangel from Texas A&M University, USA, and colleagues.
Researchers discover trigger for muscle-wasting condition
A team of researchers from the OU College of Medicine in Oklahoma City has published a research study that reveals how cachexia is triggered, setting the stage for further studies on how to prevent it.
Scientists identify a novel neural circuit mediating visually evoked innate defensive responses
Prof. WANG Liping and his colleagues ZHOU Zheng and LIU Xuemei at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed that the VTA (ventral tegmental area) GABAergic neural circuit mediates visually evoked innate defensive responses.
Ants maintain essential interactions despite environmental flux
Ants adjust their social interactions to accommodate changes in population density, according to researchers at Penn State and Georgetown University.
How we tune out distractions
MIT neuroscientists have identified a brain circuit that helps us to filter out unwanted background noise or other distracting sensory stimuli.
Researchers determine ideal areas and timing for biological control of invasive stink bug
Biological control of the brown marmorated stink bug, an invasive pest that devastates gardens and crops, would be more effective in natural areas bordering crops or at times when certain insecticides aren't being applied.
Low-priced alcopops pose high risk especially for youth, new study recommends regulation
A new study led by Dr. Matthew Rossheim in George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services found that Four Loko -- the brand of supersized alcopop most commonly consumed by underage drinkers -- is among the cheapest ready-to-drink alcoholic beverages available in the United States.
Empirical energy consumption model quantifies Bitcoin's carbon footprint
Researchers have conducted the first analysis of Bitcoin power consumption based on empirical data from IPO filings and localization of IP addresses.
Bullying gets worse as children with autism get older
Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to experience bullying than children without ASD and this bullying gets worse with age, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Mathematical tools to study tumors
The results obtained suggest that vitronectin can change the rigidity of the location of the tumorous cells.
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids.
Algorithm tells robots where nearby humans are headed
A new tool for predicting a person's movement trajectory may help humans and robots work together in close proximity.
Determining risk of recurrence in triple-negative breast cancer
A personalized prognosis for patients diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer was the goal of a new study by Katherine Varley, Ph.D., researcher at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and assistant professor of oncological sciences at the University of Utah.
Identifying colorectal cancer subtypes could lead to improved treatment decisions
Identifying a metastatic colorectal cancer patient's Consensus Molecular Subtype could help oncologists determine the most effective course of treatment.
New finding: Biomarker indicates tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis in men with prostate cancer
Mortality due to prostate cancer is usually related to its likelihood to metastasize, especially to bone.
The short life of Must Farm
Extraordinarily well-preserved Late Bronze Age settlement in Cambridgeshire provides exceptional opportunity to investigate the everyday lives of people in the final decades of the Bronze Age in Britain.
Diet at the docks: Living and dying at the port of ancient Rome
Analysis of plant, animal and human remains from Portus, the maritime port of Imperial Rome, has reconstructed for the first time the diets and geographic origins of its inhabitants, suggesting a shift in food resources following the Vandal sack of Rome in AD 455.
Could playing computer games improve your peripheral vision?
Researchers have found a significant improvement in the peripheral awareness of people who played computer games specially designed around using peripheral vision.
Researchers discover potential new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease
Apolipoproten E (apoeE) is a major genetic risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, yet it tends to be understudied as a potential druggable target for the mind-robbing neurodegenerative disease.
Carnegie Mellon researchers develop semi-liquid metal anode for next-generation batteries
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Mellon College of Science and College of Engineering have developed a semiliquid lithium metal-based anode that represents a new paradigm in battery design.
Researchers develop drug-targeting molecules to improve cancer treatment
A compound was developed from a new material, described as an easily injected hydrogel, which acts as a 'homing' cue to attract drug molecules to sites bearing a tumor.
Reaching and grasping -- Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain
When we train the reaching for and grasping of objects, we also train our brain.
A gut feeling: Microbiome changes may mean early detection of colorectal cancer
Most sporadic colorectal cancers can develop over decades. Recent studies showed that the gut microbiome has possible diagnostic potential for health and disease.
Cyclosporine benefits patients through more rapid remission of proteinuria in lupus nephritis
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) suggest maintenance therapy with cyclosporine (CYA) results in more rapid remission of proteinuria compared to mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or azathioprine (AZA) in patients with lupus nephritis.
The 'AI turn' for digital health: A futuristic view
The unprecedented implications of digital health innovations, being co-produced by the mainstreaming and integration of artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), and cyber-physical systems (CPS) in healthcare, are examined in a new technology horizon-scanning article.
New gene editor harnesses jumping genes for precise DNA integration
Scientists at Columbia have developed a gene-editing tool -- using jumping genes -- that inserts any DNA sequence into the genome without cutting, fixing a major shortcoming of existing CRISPR technology.
Future tsunamis possible in the Red Sea's Gulf of Elat-Aqaba
Researchers who took a closer look at a 1995 tsunami in the Gulf of Elat-Aqaba, at the northeastern tip of the Red Sea, say that the gulf's surrounding countries should prepare for future tsunami hazards in the economically developing vital region.
Scientists develop a primate model for autism by genome-editing
A China-US joint research team reported the generation of germline-transmittable cynomolgus macaques with Shank3 mutations, known to cause a form of autism.
Increasing red meat consumption linked with higher risk of premature death
People who increased their daily servings of red meat over an eight-year period were more likely to die during the subsequent eight years compared to people who did not increase their red meat consumption, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H.
Algorithm to transform investment banking with higher returns
A University of Bath researcher has created an algorithm which aims to remove the elements of chance, bias or emotion from investment banking decisions, a development which has the potential to reduce errors in financial decision making and improve financial returns in global markets.
Climate change benefits for giant petrels
Giant petrels will be 'temporary' winners from the effects of climate change in the Antarctic region -- but males and females will benefit in very different ways, a new study shows.
A microscopic topographic map of cellular function
The flow of traffic through our nation's highways and byways is meticulously mapped and studied, but less is known about how materials in cells travel.
Early release rules for prisoners at end of life may be 'discriminatory,' say doctors
Doctors are calling for reform to rules governing when terminally ill prisoners are suitable for early release on compassionate grounds (ERCG) amid concerns that the current approach is discriminatory.
Study supports glucocorticoid tapering in patients achieving disease control on tocilizumab
The results of a randomised controlled trial presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate high levels of treatment success in approximately two thirds of patients despite tapered glucocorticoid (GC) discontinuation, while a small loss of disease control was observed at the total study population level.
A homing beacon for chemotherapy drugs
Killing tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts is a central challenge of cancer chemotherapy.
High-density of alcohol outlets and advertising affect youth drinking
Alcohol use among Tanzanian youth is rising and the high density of alcohol selling outlets and alcohol advertisements coupled with low enforcement of minimum drinking age laws are likely facilitating this uptick.
Sensitive, noninvasive platform detects circulating tumor cells in melanoma patients
Scientists have created a laser-based platform that can quickly and noninvasively screen large quantities of blood in patients with melanoma to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) -- a precursor to deadly metastases.
Rising sea levels destroyed evidence of shell middens at many prehistoric coastal sites
In a new study, researchers confirm a theory from the 1970s that coastal hunter-gatherers processed much of their shellfish at the beach before returning with their meat to camps on higher ground, leaving the heavy shells by the water.
A matter of fine balance
How does the brain's circuitry adjust itself to make sense of the world despite the hugely different signals it receives?
HIB vaccine linked with better health, cognition, and schooling outcomes in Indian children
Researchers at CDDEP, the University of California, Riverside and Harvard T.H.
Stanford-led study investigates how much climate change affects the risk of armed conflict
Intensifying climate change will increase the future risk of violent armed conflict within countries, according to a study published today in the journal Nature.
Vitamin D and estradiol help guard against heart disease, stroke, and diabetes
Vitamin D and estrogen have already shown well-documented results in improving bone health in women.
Researcher identifies adjuvant that prevents vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease in RSV
A unique adjuvant, a substance that enhances the body's immune response to toxins and foreign matter, can prevent vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, a sickness that has posed a major hurdle in vaccine development for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to a study led by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
'Interdisciplinary research takes time'
Interdisciplinarity is becoming increasingly important in research. Yet there are structures in place that make careers in science more difficult for interdisciplinary researchers, according to Ruth Müller, Professor of Science and Technology Policy at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).
Promising treatment for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
A New Jersey team of researchers has reported the first case of successful, long-term relief of chronic refractory shoulder pain in a wheelchair user with spinal cord injury following a single injection of autologous, micro-fragmented adipose tissue.
Gemini Planet Imager analyzes 300 stars
Analysis from halfway through the Gemini Planet Imager's planetary survey hints that our solar system may have rare qualities which could possibly be related to the habitability of Earth.
Exposure to inorganic dust increases risk of gout in women by 27%
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate that occupational exposure to inorganic dust is a previously unknown risk factor for gout and also confirm known risk factors, such as alcoholism and obesity.
Disease remission associated with 80% reduction in risk of cardiovascular outcomes
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate that remission in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an 80% reduction in risk of cardiovascular outcomes.
Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite
Researchers in Japan have discovered that the Plasmodium parasites responsible for malaria rely on a human liver cell protein for their development into a form capable of infecting red blood cells and causing disease.
Specific multinutrient combination benefits patients with early stage Alzheimer's disease
A new longitudinal study has shown that a nutritional drink* designated a 'food for special medical purposes' containing the multinutrient combination Fortasyn Connect® can benefit patients with the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment, who are at risk of progressing to the dementia stage of AD, report scientists in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease Reports.
Does pornography use affect heterosexual women's intimate experiences with a partner?
A new study has shown that the relationship between pornography and intimate partner experiences among heterosexual women is indirect and complex, in contrast to the more direct link among heterosexual men.
Astrophysicist announces her discovery that could rewrite story of how galaxies die
Allison Kirkpatrick of the University of Kansas will announce a breakthrough finding that overturns assumptions about the maturation of galaxies and may represent a phase of every galaxy's life cycle that was unknown until now.
The brains of birds synchronize when they sing duets
Vocal control areas in the brain of weaver birds fire in time when they sing together.
Food access near schools and homes illuminated for children in New York city
A study of nearly 800,000 schoolchildren in New York City shows that Black, Hispanic, and Asian students live and go to school closer to both healthy and unhealthy food outlets than do White students.
Being overweight linked to significantly higher disease severity in psoriatic arthritis
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate significant correlation between body mass index (BMI) and disease severity in psoriatic arthritis.
Evolutionary discovery to rewrite textbooks
Scientists at The University of Queensland have upended biologists' century-old understanding of the evolutionary history of animals.
Fifty years later, DDT lingers in lake ecosystems
To control pest outbreaks, airplanes sprayed more than 6,280 tons of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) onto forests in New Brunswick, Canada, between 1952 and 1968, according to Environment Canada.
NASA explores our changing freshwater world
Water is so commonplace that we often take it for granted.
Increasing red meat intake linked with heightened risk of death
Increasing red meat intake, particularly processed red meat, is associated with a heightened risk of death, suggests a large US study published in The BMJ today.
Monkeys face climate change extinction threat
Monkeys living in South America are highly vulnerable to climate change and face an ''elevated risk of extinction'', according to a new University of Stirling-led study.
Genetics play strong role in determining age of menopause and overall longevity
If you're wondering why you entered menopause earlier or later than other women, blame your mother.
Scientists develop a chemocatalytic approach for one-pot reaction of cellulosic ethanol
Scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a chemocatalytic approach to convert cellulose into ethanol in a one-pot process by using a multifunctional Mo/Pt/WOx catalyst.
NASA reveals Tropical Cyclone Vayu's compact center
Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Vayu has a compact central dense overcast cloud cover.
Braces won't always bring happiness
Research undertaken at the University of Adelaide overturns the belief that turning your crooked teeth into a beautiful smile will automatically boost your self-confidence.

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