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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 13, 2019


From rain to flood
Extreme weather events, such as thunderstorms or heavy rainfall and the resulting floods, influence Earth and environmental systems in the long term.
On your bike?
A James Cook University researcher says a lack of suitable roads is a big reason why cycling participation rates in Australia and Queensland are so low.
Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities
Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University.
Making it personal: How genetic technologies are changing the face of medicine
Doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and other sites show how personalized medicine can be used to pinpoint the source of infection.
Are we using biologic therapy properly?
The introduction of infliximab (Remicade), the first biologic therapy approved for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), did not result in lower rates of hospitalizations or intestinal surgeries among patients living with IBD in Ontario, according to a study published by authors from several Canadian hospitals and ICES in the journal Gut.
CNIO researchers find effective drug combinations for glioblastoma in mice
Glioblastoma is a brain tumour with very poor prognosis. Patients with glioblastoma usually develop resistance to treatments.
New diet study using MRI to map internal fat conducted by Ben-Gurion U researchers
The study showed that a low-carb Mediterranean diet had a greater effect on reducing fat around the liver, heart and the pancreas, compared to low-fat diets with similar calorie counts, although the weight loss was similar.
New 'king' of fossils discovered in Australia
Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia.
Formation of habitual use drives cannabis addiction
A shift from brain systems controlling reward-driven use to habit-driven use differentiates heavy cannabis users who are addicted to the drug from users who aren't, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier.
Materials informatics reveals new class of super-hard alloys
A new method of discovering materials using data analytics and electron microscopy has found a new class of extremely hard alloys.
The start of a new era in stem cell therapy
The research of Assoc. Prof. Tamer Önder of Koç University and his team has shortened the time required for producing stem cells from skin cells and increased the success rate of transformation by a ten-fold.
Squid could thrive under climate change
When scientists subjected two-toned pygmy squid and bigfin reef squid to CO2levels projected for the end of the century, they received some surprising results.
The app teaching anorexics to eat again
Attempts to treat anorexia as a mental illness have largely failed, claim Swedish scientists.
Breaking the code: How is a mother's immunity transferred to her baby?
A study based at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard has determined how a pregnant woman's vaccine-induced immunity is transferred to her child, which has implications for the development of more effective maternal vaccines.
New application can detect Twitter bots in any language
Thanks to fruitful collaboration between language scholars and machine learning specialists, a new application developed by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Linnaeus University in Sweden can detect Twitter bots independent of the language used.
A metal-free, sustainable approach to CO2 reduction
Researchers in Japan present an organic catalyst for carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction that is inexpensive, readily available and recyclable.
Gut microbes eat our medication
Researchers have discovered one of the first concrete examples of how the microbiome can interfere with a drug's intended path through the body.
Using data to decide when to transfer patients by medical helicopter
A Cleveland, Ohio nursing scientist is leading a study he believes will support what he says is a much-needed change in how medical helicopters are used -- especially for transfers between hospitals.
Oxygen shapes arms and legs: Origins of a new developmental mechanism called 'interdigital cell death'
Scientists at Tokyo Tech, Yamagata University and Harvard University have discovered that environmental oxygen plays an important role shaping the hands and feet during development.
Hubble observes tiny galaxy with big heart
Nestled within this field of bright foreground stars lies ESO 495-21, a tiny galaxy with a big heart.
Low vitamin K levels linked to mobility limitation and disability in older adults
Tufts University researchers led the first study to evaluate the association between biomarkers of vitamin K status and mobility limitation and disability, and found older adults with low levels of circulating vitamin K were more likely to develop these conditions.
Research identifies key driver for infanticide among chimpanzees
Study concludes that the sexual selection hypothesis was the main reason for the high rates of infanticide among a community of chimpanzees in Uganda.
The surprising reason why some lemurs may be more sensitive to forest loss
Scientists have given us another way to tell which endangered lemurs are most at risk from deforestation -- based on the bacteria that inhabit their guts.
New insight could improve maternal vaccines that also protect newborns
Duke researchers describe a previously unidentified route for antibodies to be transferred from the mother to the fetus, illuminating a potential way to capitalize on this process to control when and how certain antibodies are shared.
New study debunks theoretical risks of live-attenuated vaccines in children with rheumatic diseases
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), jointly organized with the Paediatric Rheumatology Society (PReS), demonstrate no vaccine infections, and no disease flare, in the 234 rheumatic patients who received live-attenuated booster vaccination while taking immune suppressing therapies.
University of Konstanz researchers create uniform-shape polymer nanocrystals
Researchers from the University of Konstanz's Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1214 'Anisotropic Particles as Building Blocks: Tailoring Shape, Interactions and Structures' successfully generate uniform-shape nanocrystals using direct polymerization
Exercise may have different effects in the morning and evening
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have learned that the effect of exercise may differ depending on the time of day it is performed.
New biomarkers for cardiovascular risk in patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE)
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) identify ApoB:A1 ratio and metabolomic lipoprotein signatures as potential biomarkers for cardiovascular risk in patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE).
Handgun licensing more effective at reducing gun deaths than background checks alone
A new white paper from the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health concludes that of the approaches used by states to screen out prohibited individuals from owning firearms, only purchaser licensing has been shown to reduce gun homicides and suicides.
Patients at a reduced risk of venous thromboembolism and persistent pain after partial versus total knee replacement
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate reduced risk of venous thromboembolism and persistent pain, but increased risk of revision in partial versus total knee replacement in patients with osteoarthritis.
Study supports bisphosphonate use prior to denosumab to prevent loss of bone mineral density in post-menopausal women
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) finds the risk of bone mineral density (BMD) loss after denosumab discontinuation is associated with younger age, high bone turnover markers, and not receiving the bisphosphonate, zoledronate, prior to initiation of denosumab.
Financial vulnerability may discourage positive negotiation strategies
People who feel financially vulnerable may be prone to believing incorrectly their success in negotiations must come at the expense of the other party, leading them to ignore the potential for more cooperative and mutually beneficial options, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
New record: 3D-printed optical-electronic integration
In this work, researchers demonstrate an electrically modulated microlaser module on a 3D-integrated microsystem composed of a dye-doped polymeric microcavity and an underneath microscale electrical heating circuit.
Cooking vegetables: healthier with extra virgin olive oil
Cooking vegetables in the sofrito (sauté) with extra virgin olive oil favours the absorption and release of bioactive compounds of its traditional ingredients (garlic, onion and tomato), according to the study published in the journal Molecules about the role of gastronomy in the health-improving effects of the Mediterranean Diet.
Bitcoin causing CO2 emissions comparable to Hamburg
The use of Bitcoin causes around 22 megatons in CO2 emissions annually -- comparable to the total emissions of cities such as Hamburg or Las Vegas.
Smoking may impair body's blood pressure autocorrect system
Smokers may be at a higher risk for developing hypertension, and an overactive response to normal drops in blood pressure may help explain why, according to researchers.
Please see special handling
A personalized active lifestyle program for employees with metabolic syndrome (who are at high risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes) that uses wearable activity trackers, a smartphone app, and face-to-face sessions with exercise coaches, can reduce disease severity in both men and women in various occupations, according to a randomized trial of over 300 workers published in The Lancet Public Health journal.
Verinurad with febuxostat significantly reduces albuminuria and hyperuricaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes in Phase IIa trial
The results of a phase IIa clinical trial presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate a rapid reduction in albuminuria and hyperuricaemia in patients with type II diabetes with combined treatment of verinurad and febuxostat.
The Lancet: First randomised trial finds no substantial difference in risk of acquiring HIV for three different forms of contraception
A randomised trial of more than 7,800 African women found that a type of contraceptive injection (intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate -- DMPA-IM) posed no substantially increased risk of HIV acquisition when compared with a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant.
Rutgers scientist creates 'virtual biopsy' device to detect skin tumors
Using sound vibrations and pulses of near-infrared light, a Rutgers University scientist has developed a new 'virtual biopsy' device that can quickly determine a skin lesion's depth and potential malignancy without using a scalpel.
Early-season hurricanes result in greater transmission of mosquito-borne infectious disease
The timing of a hurricane is one of the primary factors influencing its impact on the spread of mosquito-borne infectious diseases such as West Nile Virus, dengue, chikungunya and Zika, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
UTMB researchers learned how to better combat muscle loss during space flights
A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has further documented how muscles are affected by reduced gravity conditions during space flight missions and uncovered how exercise and hormone treatments can be tailored to minimize muscle loss for individual space travelers.
New model more accurately predicts choices in classic decision-making task
A new mathematical model that predicts which choices people will make in the Iowa Gambling Task, a task used for the past 25 years to study decision-making, outperforms previously developed models.
Many choices seems promising until you actually have to choose
People faced with more options than they can effectively consider want to make a good decision, but feel they're unable to do so, according to the results of a novel study from the University at Buffalo.
Identification of protective antibodies may be key to effective malaria vaccine
Researchers from the University of Oxford, along with partners from five institutions around the world, have identified the human antibodies that prevent the malaria parasite from entering blood cells, which may be key to creating a highly effective malaria vaccination.
Study shows that strength and weight training can control diabetes in obese individuals
In experiments with mice, Brazilian scientists demonstrated that a moderate training protocol reduced liver fat and made the organ more sensitive to insulin, even before loss of body weight occurred.
PCSK9 inhibitors: Specific studies are mandatory to prove efficacy and safety in CKD
High cardiovascular morbidity and mortality remains a persisting problem in patients with CKDPCSK9 inhibition represents a novel and successful treatment approach to reduce LDL-C in patients with normal to moderately impaired kidney function.
Research reveals liquid gold on the nanoscale
Swansea University researchers have discovered what liquid gold looks like on the nanoscale - and in doing so have mapped the way in which nanoparticles melt, which is relevant to the manufacturing and performance of nanotech devices such as bio-sensors, nanochips , gas sensors, and catalysts.
Downward head tilt can make people seem more dominant
We often look to people's faces for signs of how they're thinking or feeling, trying to gauge whether their eyes are narrowed or widened, whether the mouth is turned up or down.
Secondhand horror: Indirect predator odor triggers reproductive changes in bank voles
The study of University of Jyväskylä and University of Vienna shows that voles are able to determine the difference between the smell of a predator, the smell of a non-stressed vole, and the smell of a vole who encountered a predator.
Rheumatoid arthritic pain could be caused by antibodies
Antibodies that exist in the joints before the onset of rheumatoid arthritis can cause pain even in the absence of arthritis, researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report.
Satellite sees tropical cyclone Vayu centered off India coastline
Tropical Cyclone Vayu's eye was just off the western coast of India when the NOAA-20 satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.
Viruses found to use intricate 'treadmill' to move cargo across bacterial cells
Using advanced technologies to explore the inner workings of bacteria, biologists at UC San Diego have provided the first example of cargo within bacteriophage cells transiting along treadmill-like structures.
Studies show vapor and THPs cause minimal teeth, skin and wallpaper staining
Studies by scientists at British American Tobacco have shown that aerosol from potentially reduced-risk products (PRRPs), such as vapor and tobacco heating products (THPs), cause significantly less staining to tooth enamel, skin, cloth and wallpaper than does the smoke from conventional cigarettes.
Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing
Spending at least two hours a week in nature may be a crucial threshold for promoting health and wellbeing, according to a new large-scale study.
Study shows 'safety bubble' expands during third trimester
New research, published in the journal Scientific Reports, shows that women undergo a significant mental as well as physical change during the late stages of pregnancy.
Trinity study finds over a quarter of adults aged 50+ are deficient in vitamin D
Over a quarter of adults aged 50+ are deficient in vitamin D according to researchers from Trinity College Dublin who announced their findings today (Thursday, June 13, 2019).
Antibody treatment allows transplant of mismatched stem cells, tissues in mice
A combination of six antibodies can successfully prepare mice to accept blood and immune stem cells from an immunologically mismatched donor, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
People using third-party apps to analyze personal genetic data
The burgeoning field of personal genetics appeals to people who want to learn more about themselves, their family and their propensity for diseases.
Novel communications architecture for future ultra-high speed wireless networks
SEARCHLIGHT project radically rethinks wireless architectures for highly scalable ultra-dense millimeter-wave networks.
Lower risk of Type 1 diabetes seen in children vaccinated against 'stomach flu' virus
Vaccinating babies against a virus that causes childhood 'stomach flu' greatly reduces their chance of getting so sick that they need hospital care, a new study shows.
Warming waters in western tropical Pacific may affect West Antarctic Ice Sheet
Warming waters in the western tropical Pacific Ocean have significantly increased thunderstorms and rainfall, which may affect the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and global sea-level rise, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study.
Researchers develop new method to rapidly, reliably monitor sickle cell disease
Researchers have developed a rapid and reliable new method to continuously monitor sickle cell disease using a microfluidics-based electrical impedance sensor.
Half of Ebola outbreaks undetected
An estimated half of Ebola virus disease outbreaks have gone undetected since it was discovered in 1976, according to research published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
Still an unmet need: New therapeutic targets in Alport syndrome
Alport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary disease that leads to progressive proteinuria, renal fibrosis, and kidney failure.
Small currents for big gains in spintronics
UTokyo researchers have created an electronic component that demonstrates functions and abilities important to future generations of computational logic and memory devices.
Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits
Free fingers have many obvious advantages on land, such as in locomotion and grasping, while webbed fingers are typical of aquatic or gliding animals.
X and gamma rays --Even more powerful
International group of researchers including scientists from Skoltech have invented a new method for the generation of intense X and gamma-ray radiation based on Nonlinear Compton Scattering.
Once thought to be asexual, single-celled parasites caught in the act
The single-celled parasite Leishmania can reproduce sexually, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices
Researchers at the University of Bristol are working on a project to develop wearable rehabilitative devices that can help disabled people sit, stand and walk in comfort.
Even in young children: Higher weight = higher blood pressure
Overweight 4-year-olds have a doubled risk of high blood pressure by age six, raising the hazard of future heart attack and stroke.
Phase 3 topline data for ULTOMIRIS® (ravulizumab) in aHUS presented at ERA-EDTA Congress
Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the first conference presentation of the topline Phase 3 data for ULTOMIRIS® (ravulizumab), the first and only long-acting C5 complement inhibitor administered every eight weeks, in adult patients with atypical hemolytic syndrome (aHUS).
New assay detects patients' resistance to antimalarial drugs from a drop of blood
Antimalarial drugs appear to follow a typical pattern, with early effectiveness eventually limited by the emergence of drug resistance.
Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing
Using a new approach, Princeton University researchers detected the elusive Majorana quasiparticle, notable for being its own antiparticle and for its potential as the basis for a robust quantum computing system, in a device built from a superconductor, small magnetic elements, and a topological insulator.
Laser trick produces high-energy terahertz pulses
A team of scientists from DESY and the University of Hamburg has achieved an important milestone in the quest for a new type of compact particle accelerator.
FEFU scientists to broaden ideas about reactive sintering of transparent ceramics
Green bodies' porous structure, i.e. mesostructure, affects dramatically the functional parameters of the optical ceramics obtained by reactive sintering.
The formative years: Giant planets vs. brown dwarfs
Based on preliminary results from a new Gemini Observatory survey of 531 stars with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), it appears more and more likely that large planets and brown dwarfs have very different roots.
NASA's Fermi mission reveals its highest-energy gamma-ray bursts
For 10 years, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has scanned the sky for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the universe's most luminous explosions.
Married US moms aim to have first baby in the spring, new research shows
Educated and married American moms are more likely to try to time their pregnancy so that they have their first baby in the spring, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School in the UK.
Researchers developing new treatment that could protect people with cardiovascular disease
New research is paving the way for the first medical treatment to help protect people from cardiovascular disease by boosting the body's natural defences.
Half of Ebola outbreaks go undetected, study finds
Half of Ebola outbreaks have gone undetected since the virus was discovered in 1976, scientists at the University of Cambridge estimate.
Earth's heavy metals result of supernova explosion, University of Guelph Research Reveals
New research by a University of Guelph physicist suggests most of Earth's heavy metals were spewed from a largely overlooked kind of star explosion called a collapsar.
No link between cancer and tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) use in psoriatic arthritis
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) suggest that overall cancer risk is not linked to tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) use in psoriatic arthritis.
Growing life expectancy inequality in US cannot be blamed on opioids alone
A new University of Michigan study challenges a popularized view about what's causing the growing gap between the lifespans of more- and less-educated Americans -- finding shortcomings in the widespread narrative that the United States is facing an epidemic of 'despair.'
Migratory hoverflies 'key' as many insects decline
Migratory hoverflies are 'key' to pollination and controlling crop pests amid the decline of many other insect species, new research shows.
Monitoring educational equity
A centralized, consistently reported system of indicators of educational equity is needed to bring attention to disparities in the US education system, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
Research shows temperature, glyphosate increase probability for dicamba volatility
New research from the UT Institute of Agriculture suggests spraying dicamba in warm temperatures and adding glyphosate to a dicamba spray mixture could increase dicamba volatility, potentially leading to increased off-target movement and damage to non-tolerant plants.
MRI plays a role in diagnosis of cocaine-related damage to the heart
Cardiac MRI has a pivotal role to play in the diagnosis of cocaine-induced cardiovascular diseases, according to a new article.
New economic study shows combination of SNAP and WIC improves food security
Forty million Americans are food insecure. Given the extent of food insecurity, a team of Iowa State University economists developed a methodology to analyze potential redundancies between two food assistance programs -- SNAP and WIC.
Cardiology medication affordability in Russia studied in a new report
Reliable information on prices and availability of medicines is the main foundation for improving access to medicines through development of public policy and evidence-based programs.
The use of mobile phone and the development of new pathologies
Professor Raquel Cantero of the University of Malaga (UMA) has identified a generational change in the use of this finger due to the influence of new technologies.
Cardiac toxicity risk factors identified with relapsed multiple myeloma therapy
More than half of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma treated with carfilzomib experienced cardiac issues during treatment, according to a multi-institutional study published June 12, 2019 in Journal of Clinical Oncology.
Special fibroblasts help pancreatic cancer cells evade immune detection
A subpopulation of fibroblasts called apCAFs can interact with the immune system to help pancreatic cancer cells avoid detection.
Implanted drug 'reservoir' safely reduces injections for people with macular degeneration
In a clinical trial of 220 people with 'wet' age-related macular degeneration, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, collaborators from many sites across the country, and Genentech in South San Francisco have added to evidence that using a new implant technology that continuously delivers medication into the eyes is safe and effective in helping maintain vision and reduces the need for injections in the eyes.
One-fifth of US surgeons still overusing riskier procedure to create kidney dialysis access
Long-term hemodialysis is a lifesaver for approximately half a million patients in the United States with kidney failure (also known as end-stage renal disease, or ESRD) who are either waiting on or unsuitable for a kidney transplant.
BTI researchers discover interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses
Aphids and the plant viruses they transmit cause billions of dollars in crop damage every year.
A new study reveals 'hidden' phases of matter through the power of light
New chemistry research from MIT and the University of Pennsylvania demonstrates how 'hidden' phases of matter can be activated by extremely fast pulses of light.
Aging delayed in older mice given blood component from young mice
New research has identified a novel approach to staving off the detrimental effects of aging, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Concert of magnetic moments
An international collaboration between researchers from Germany, the Netherlands, and South Korea has uncovered a new way how the electron spins in layered materials can interact.
The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds 'sound' words predict psychosis
Automated analysis of the two language variables -- more frequent use of words associated with sound and speaking with low semantic density, or vagueness -- can predict whether an at-risk person will later develop psychosis with 93 percent accuracy.
Common conditions keep many patients out of knee cartilage research studies
Issues like age or existing arthritis may preclude patients from participating in clinical studies for new therapies that could benefit them
The power of a love song: Dopamine affects seasonal hearing in fish and facilitates mating
Scientists at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and Brooklyn College have discovered seasonal changes in dopamine levels in the female plainfin midshipman fish's inner ear helps hearing sensitivity grow in the summer mating season, making her better able to hear the male's mating calls.
Genes for Good project harnesses Facebook to reach larger, more diverse groups of people
In 2015, a group of researchers hypothesized that our collective love of Facebook surveys could be harnessed for serious genetic studies.
Lowering cholesterol is not enough to reduce hyperactivity of the immune system
Despite treatment with statins, many patients with elevated cholesterol levels will still develop cardiovascular disease.
Research finds pre-pregnancy weight affects infant growth response to breast milk
In the first study of its kind, LSU Health New Orleans researchers report that women's pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity produces changes in breast milk, which can affect infant growth.
Understanding social structure is important to rewilding
Increasing the success of wildlife translocations is critical, given the escalating global threats to wildlife.
Genetic inequity towards endocrine disruptors
Phthalates are used by industry in plastic products. Their toxic effect on the endocrine system is worrying.
New imaging modality targets cholesterol in arterial plaque
In an article published in the peer-reviewed SPIE publication Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), 'Frequency-domain differential photoacoustic radar: theory and validation for ultra-sensitive atherosclerotic plaque imaging,' researchers demonstrate a new imaging modality that successfully identifies the presence of cholesterol in the arterial plaque.
Butting out: Researchers gauge public opinion on tobacco product waste
Requiring cigarettes to contain biodegradable filters, fining smokers who litter cigarette butts and expanding smoke free outdoor areas are measures the public considers are most likely to reduce tobacco product waste, new University of Otago research reveals.
Bacterial chemical 'signatures' a sign of damaged gut microbiome in critical illness
Chemicals produced by healthy bacteria could be used to assess the health of the gut microbiome and help identify critically-ill children at greatest risk of organ failure, a study published in Critical Care Medicine has found.
Polycomb protein EED plays a starring role in hippocampal development
A team led by Professor Liu Changmei from the State Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, has shown that the PcG protein EED is essential for the proper formation of the DG.
Triple-negative breast cancer among black women in the US varies by birthplace
A new study finds substantial variation in the prevalence of triple-negative breast cancer among black women with breast cancer by birthplace in the United States.
Increase in resolution, scale takes CT scanning and diagnosis to the next level
Researchers have developed a new, 3D tissue imaging technique, called X-ray histotomography.
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Chemists at EPFL have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials.
Excess weight and body fat cause cardiovascular disease
In the first Mendelian randomization study to look at this, researchers have found evidence that excess weight and body fat cause a range of heart and blood vessel diseases (rather than just being associated with it).
Can break junction techniques still offer quantitative information at single-molecule level
A conductance histogram is plotted to find the most probable conductance.
Enhanced human Blood-Brain Barrier Chip performs in vivo-like drug and antibody transport
A team at Harvard's Wyss Institute has leveraged its microfluidic Organs-on-Chips technology in combination with a developmentally-inspired hypoxia-mimicking approach to differentiate human pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs).
Perfect diamagnetism observation of high-temperature superconductivity in compressed H2S
The research group of Prof. Tian Cui from Jilin University has made a breakthrough in fulfilling the perfect diamagnetism of sulfur hydride system under high pressure, using a highly sensitive magnetic susceptibility technique adapted for a megabar-pressure diamond anvil cell (DAC).
Making the 'human-body internet' more effective
Human body communication (HBC) uses the human body to transmit power and data, much like the internet.
Carboplatin & paclitaxel chemotherapy alone should remain standard treatment for endometrial cancer
The New England Journal of Medicine recently published the primary endpoint of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-GOG 0258, which showed that carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy preceded by radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin, or combined modality therapy, did not significantly increase recurrence-free survival for women with stage 3-4A endometrial cancer when compared to chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel alone.
Salmonella resistant to antibiotics of last resort found in US
Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a gene that gives Salmonella resistance to antibiotics of last resort in a sample taken from a human patient in the US The find is the first evidence that the gene mcr-3.1 has made its way into the US from Asia.
Clinical trials and research priorities in dialysis patients: Time for a new approach?
Historically, the number of ESRD RCTs has been very low compared to other subspecialties.
Sensing food textures is a matter of pressure
Food's texture affects whether it is eaten, liked or rejected, according to Penn State researchers, who say some people are better at detecting even minor differences in consistency because their tongues can perceive particle sizes.
New quantum dot microscope shows electric potentials of individual atoms
Researchers from Jülich in cooperation with partners from other institutions has developed a new method to measure the electric potentials of a sample at atomic accuracy.
Using prevalent technologies and 'Internet of Things' data for atmospheric science
The use of prevalent technologies and crowdsourced data may benefit weather forecasting and atmospheric research.
A new paradigm of material identification based on graph theory
Automatic deduplication for big materials database is achieved for the first time.

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We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...