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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 14, 2019


What it takes for green businesses to advertise online
The internet has facilitated the growth of online advertising over the past decade, and online advertising has moved from being a peripheral to a central advertising medium because of its unique targeting capabilities.
NASA finds tropical cyclone Vayu off India's Gujarat coast
NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Vayu still lingering near the northwestern coast of India, and its cloud-filled eye remained offshore.
Language-savvy parents improve their children's reading development, Concordia study shows
Parents with higher reading-related knowledge are not only more likely to have children with higher reading scores but are also more attentive when those children read out loud to them.
'Power shift' needed to improve gender balance in energy research, report says
Women still face significant barriers in forging successful and influential careers in UK energy research, a new high-level report has revealed.
USC study finds e-cigarette cartoon ads may increase likelihood of vaping
The use of cartoon characters in ads for e-cigarettes and e-liquids may be attracting young people to use the products in the future, according to a new USC study.
Higher coronary artery calcium levels in middle-age may indicate higher risk for future heart problems
Middle-aged patients with higher levels of coronary artery calcium buildup were more likely to have higher left ventricular mass and worse left ventricular function of the heart, particularly among blacks.
American football: The first quarter is crucial
Researchers from Dartmouth College, New Hampshire have found evidence that players born in the first quarter of the year are more likely to play in the National Football League.
A shady spot may protect species against rapid climate warming
A shady refuge on a hot day could be more than a simple comfort in a warming world.
Online shopping interventions may help customers buy healthier foods
Altering the default order in which foods are shown on the screen, or offering substitutes lower in saturated fat could help customers make healthier choices when shopping for food online, according to a study published in the open access International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.
The challenges of North American specialty cut flowers
Cut flower production in the United States and Canada has increased in recent years.
How was Medicaid expansion associated with rates of child maltreatment?
State-level data were analyzed to determine whether Medicaid expansion was associated with changes in rates of physical abuse and neglect of children younger than 6.
Researchers' discovery could lead to improved therapies for duchenne muscular dystrophy
Researchers found that the protein sarcospan can play a major role in combating heart failure in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
Baby socks found to contain traces of bisphenol A and parabens
A study conducted by scientists from the UGR and the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital in Granada, Spain, has discovered traces of these two toxic chemicals in fabrics used in babywear.
NASA finds Tropical Cyclone's Vayu getting stretched
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean, it captured an infrared image that revealed Tropical Cyclone Vayu was elongating.
Inflammatory bowel disease and type i diabetes increase chances of developing rheumatoid arthritis
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate increased rates of type I diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients that go on to develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method at 37°C
Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics.
Benefits beyond fracture risk reduction? Results of the VITALE study
While a kidney transplant can restore healthy kidney function, recipients remain at increased risk of fractures, heart disease, diabetes and some cancers.
Discovery of new mutations may lead to better treatment
In the largest study to date on developmental delay, researchers analyzed genomic data from over 31,000 parent-child trios and found more than 45,000 de novo mutations, and 40 novel genes.
Nephrology and Public Policy Committee (NPPC) aims to intensify research activity
Epidemiological and clinical research and public policy in Europe are generally considered to be comprehensive and successful - and the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) is playing a key role in the field of nephrology research.
Modified enzyme can increase second-generation ethanol production
Using a protein produced by a fungus that lives in the Amazon, Brazilian researchers developed a molecule capable of increasing glucose release from biomass for fermentation.
Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for fetal sickle cell disease moves a step closer
Sickle cell disease is a form of anemia that is inherited when both parents are carriers of a mutation in the hemoglobin gene.
Part of the immune strategy of the strawberry plant is characterized
A University of Cordoba research group classified a gene family responsible for partial control of strawberry defense mechanisms when attacked by common pathogens in crop fields
Development of durable MTJ under harsh environment for STT-MRAM at 1Xnm technology node
Researchers at Tohoku University have announced the development of a new magnetic tunnel junction, by which the team has demonstrated an extended retention time for digital information without an increase of the active power consumption.
Flickering sky islands generate andean biodiversity
As the climate changed over the past million years, areas of paramo around Andean peaks in Colombia grew and contracted, giving rise to species unique to this habitat.
No evidence for increased egg predation in the Arctic
Climate and ecosystems are changing, but predation on shorebird nests has changed little across the globe over the past 60 years, finds an international team of 60 researchers.
Tildrakizumab shows promising efficacy and safety in psoriatic arthritis
The results of a phase 2B study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate superior efficacy and comparable safety of tildrakizumab versus placebo in patients with psoriatic arthritis.
Heritable behavioral differences between cat breeds
Cat breeds differ from each other in behavior with regard to activity, aggressiveness, shyness, sociability and stereotypical behavior.
Artificial nose identifies malignant tissue in brain tumours during surgery
An artificial nose developed at Tampere University, Finland, helps neurosurgeons to identify cancerous tissue during surgery and enables the more precise excision of tumours.
Virus genes help determine if pea aphids get their wings
Researchers from the University of Rochester shed light on the important role that microbial genes, like those from viruses, can play in insect and animal evolution.
Small cluster of neurons is off-on switch for mouse songs
Researchers at Duke University have isolated a cluster of neurons in a mouse's brain that are crucial to making the squeaky, ultrasonic 'songs' a male mouse produces when courting a potential mate.
SPbU scientists have discovered the first family of extracellular Rickettsia-like bacteria
Microbiologists of St Petersburg University, together with researchers from the University of Milan, the University of Pisa, and the University of Pavia, have discovered a new family of bacteria belonging to the order Rickettsiales -- Deianiraeaceae.
Better prognosticating for dogs with mammary tumors
For dogs with mammary tumors, deciding a course of treatment can depend on a variety of factors, some of which may seem to contradict one another.
Beyond Queen's stomp-stomp-clap: Concerts and computer science converge in new research
How to get large numbers of people engaged in participating during a live performance like a concert -- or a lecture -- and channel that energy for a sustained time period.
Exciting plant vacuoles
Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process.
Study develops updated national birth weight reference
A new paper provides an updated national birth weight reference for the United States using the most recent, nationally representative birth data.
Patient organization challenges government to bring vital support to people with rheumatic diseases in Cyprus
The campaign presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) reports how the Cyprus League Against Rheumatism (CYPLAR) successfully took on the Ministry of Health after authorization was denied to introduce specialized rheumatology nurses due to a perceived lack of interest in rheumatology education.
Moral emotions, a diagnotic tool for frontotemporal dementia?
A study conducted by Marc Teichmann and Carole Azuar at the Brain and Spine Institute in Paris (France) and at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital shows a particularly marked impairment of moral emotions in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD).
WVU researcher studies new treatment for pancreatic cancer
If the American Cancer Society's projections prove accurate, more people will die from pancreatic cancer than from breast, brain, ovarian or prostate cancer this year.
Scientists investigate climate and vegetation drivers of terrestrial carbon fluxes
A better understanding of terrestrial flux dynamics will come from elucidating the integrated effects of climate and vegetation constraints on gross primary productivity, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem productivity.
Electron beam strengthens recyclable nanocomposite
Carbon fiber-enhanced thermoplastic polymer mechanical properties improve when irradiated with an electron beam, report researchers at Kanazawa University in the journal Composites Part A.
What drives Yellowstone's massive elk migrations?
Yellowstone's migratory elk rely primarily on environmental cues, including a retreating snowline and the greening grasses of spring, to decide when to make the treks between their winter ranges and summer ranges, shows a new study led by University of California, Berkeley, researchers.
Dickkopf-related protein 3 (DKK3) predicts AKI
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after cardiac surgery.
Immortal quantum particles
Decay is relentless in the macroscopic world: broken objects do not fit themselves back together again.
Indigestion remedy slows kidney function decline and improves survival in late-stage CKD
As chronic kidney disease (CKD) progresses, the kidneys become less able to maintain a healthy balance of acids in the body.
No direct link between north Atlantic currents, sea level along New England coast
A new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) clarifies what influence major currents in the North Atlantic have on sea level along the northeastern United States.
Using waves to move droplets
Self-cleaning surfaces and laboratories on a chip become even more efficient if we are able to control individual droplets.
Researchers take two steps toward green fuel
An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT),Japan, has developed a two-step method to more efficiently break down carbohydrates into their single sugar components, a critical process in producing green fuel.
One class in all languages
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a new machine translation system that outputs subtitles in multiple languages for archived university lectures.
Working in the last 6 months before haemodialysis is associated with a better survival
In a study published in CKJ, 26% of patients were employed 6 months prior to dialysis start -- but this fell to 15% when dialysis began.
Controlling temperatures for inexpensive plant experiments
Inexpensive, easy-to-use temperature controllers are able to provide reliable set temperatures for the detailed observation of developmental rates in response to different temperature treatments.
Satellite observations improve earthquake monitoring, response
Researchers at the University of Iowa and the United States Geologic Survey report data gathered by orbiting satellites can yield more information about destructive earthquakes and can improve aid and humanitarian response efforts.
High tunnels for specialty crops: The hope and the hinderance
Research on the application of season-expanding growing technique provides an in-depth understanding of farm-level challenges associated with high tunnel adoption and usage.
Phantom sensations: When the sense of touch deceives
Without being aware of it, people sometimes wrongly perceive tactile sensations.
Can we still have fun if the UK goes carbon neutral?
Will Britain going carbon neutral mean no more fun? Experts from the University of Surrey have urged local policy makers to put in place infrastructure that will enable people to enjoy recreation and leisure while keeping their carbon footprint down.
Hubble sets sights on an explosive galaxy
When massive stars die at the end of their short lives, they light up the cosmos with bright, explosive bursts of light and material known as supernovae.
International experts call for action for world's 450 million scabies sufferers
An alignment of researchers, health ministries and the World Health Organization has outlined the steps to develop a global program to control scabies -- the parasitic disease affecting 450 million people annually in mainly low-income countries.
Researchers identify traits linked to better outcomes in HPV-linked head and neck cancer
University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers identified characteristics that could be used to personalize treatment for patients with a type of head and neck cancer linked to HPV infection.
NIAID scientists develop 'mini-brain' model of human prion disease
Scientists have used human skin cells to create what they believe is the first cerebral organoid system, or 'mini-brain,' for studying sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).
It's not easy being green
Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening.
Overweight men are inhibiting childbirth
About 15% of couples in fertile age have experienced fertility problems.
How Sweden went from 'least democratic' to welfare state
In a new study, Lund University economic historian Erik Bengtsson debunks the myth that Sweden was destined to become a social democratic country.
Researchers find genes that could help create more resilient chickens
An international team of scientists, led by Penn State researchers, have identified genes that may help farmers, especially ones in low- and middle-income countries, breed chickens that can resist one of the biggest disease threats facing poultry today.
Study reveals significant gaps in essential rheumatoid arthritis care across Europe and between European countries
The results of a large pan-European survey presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) investigated significant gaps in rheumatoid arthritis care across 16 patient-centered Standards of Care in rheumatoid arthritis.
Snack peppers find acceptance with reduced seed count
Small/miniature sweet and hot peppers, such as snack peppers, are a rapidly growing class of specialty peppers.
Electron (or 'hole') pairs may survive effort to kill superconductivity
Scientists seeking to understand the mechanism underlying superconductivity in 'stripe-ordered' cuprates -- copper-oxide materials with alternating areas of electric charge and magnetism -- discovered an unusual metallic state when attempting to turn superconductivity off.
Vagus nerve stimulation study shows significant reduction in rheumatoid arthritis symptoms
The results of a pilot study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) suggest that electro stimulation of one of the nerves connecting the brain to the body (the vagus nerve), could provide a novel treatment approach for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
New research on the prevalence of JUUL use and awareness amongst US youth age 13 to 17
The Centre for Substance Use Research estimate the prevalence of awareness and use of the JUUL e-cigarette among adolescents in the United States.
The current Nor­we­gian Bar­ents Sea risk governance frame­work would need con­sid­er­able
A recent case study from the University of Helsinki examines different ways of framing oil spill risks with regard to the Norwegian Barents Sea where new areas have been recently opened for oil exploration and exploitation.
Distant processes influence marine heatwaves around the world
An international team has produced the first global assessment of the major drivers of marine heatwaves.
Suicidal thoughts related to pain in 1 in 10 patients with rheumatic or musculoskeletal disease
The results of a survey presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) highlight the significant impact of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) on mental health and a worrying lack of psychological care.
Linagliptin improved albuminuria but effect on eGFR and CV risk in patients with diabetes
In the CARMELINA trial nearly 10% of all patients with diabetes had nephrotic-range proteinuria at baseline.
Two genes implicated in development of prostate enlargement, Stanford study finds
In a new study, scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered a molecular pattern that flags prostate enlargement, also called benign prostatic hyperplasia, and have even identified two genes that likely play a role in the development of the condition.

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