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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 16, 2019


Balancing data protection and research needs in the age of the GDPR
Scientific journals and funding bodies often require researchers to deposit individual genetic data from studies in research repositories in order to increase data sharing with the aim of enabling the reproducibility of new findings, as well as facilitating new discoveries.
Genetic study of the causes of excess liver iron may lead to better treatment
Researchers have shown that genes regulating iron metabolism in the body are responsible for excess liver iron.
The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate
Researchers from the University of Plymouth and the British Antarctic Survey have presented support for the theory that marine invertebrates with larger body size are generally more sensitive to reductions in oxygen than smaller animals, and so will be more sensitive to future global climate change.
Tiny probe that senses deep in the lung set to shed light on disease
A hair-sized probe that can measure key indicators of tissue damage deep in the lung has been developed by scientists.
Interest free loans could prevent homelessness and save councils millions, according to a new study
A homeless prevention interest free loan scheme in Lewisham, which has helped over 300 families escape eviction and saved the council over £1 million, could be replicated across the UK a new study suggests.
UVA scientists use machine learning to improve gut disease diagnosis
A study published by scientists at the University of Virginia says machine learning algorithms applied to biopsy images can shorten the time for diagnosing and treating a gut disease that often causes permanent physical and cognitive damage in children.

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