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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 19, 2019


Methods and models
It's a well-known fact that the ocean is one of the biggest absorbers of the carbon dioxide emitted by way of human activity.
Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire.
Researchers see around corners to detect object shapes
Computer vision researchers have demonstrated they can use special light sources and sensors to see around corners or through gauzy filters, enabling them to reconstruct the shapes of unseen objects.
Artificial muscles powered by glucose
Artificial muscles made from polymers can now be powered by energy from glucose and oxygen, just like biological muscles.
Researchers call for change to river management and modelling
A team of international experts including La Trobe University ecologist Nick Bond, led by the University of Canterbury, are calling for urgent global change to how we manage and model river ecosystems.
The secret of platinum deposits revealed by field observations in South Africa
There are two competing ideas of how platinum deposits formed: the first involves gravity-induced settling of crystals on the chamber floor, while the second idea implies that the crystals grow in situ, directly on the floor of the magmatic chamber.
A forest of nano-mushroom structures keep this plastic clean and stain-free
Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have created a flexible optical plastic that is stain-resistant and superomniphobic, finding inspiration in a surprising place: the shape of Enoki mushrooms.
Lifelong obesity linked to physical difficulties aged 50
People who are obese from childhood through to middle age are more than twice as likely to have difficulty with daily tasks such as lifting, climbing stairs and carrying shopping by the time they are 50, a new UCL study has found.
Boomers back on the dating scene seek cosmetic procedures to put their best face forward
In today's dating world, singles make snap judgments about potential dates as fast as they can swipe.
Astronomers make first detection of polarised radio waves in Gamma Ray Burst jets
Astronomers detect polarised radio waves from a gamma-ray burst for the first time.
Powering a solution: Professor takes charge at improving lithium ion batteries safety
Dr. Yu Zhu and his team of graduate students in The University of Akron's College of Polymer Science and Polymer Engineering are working to improve the safety of Li-ion batteries by creating a shear-thickening electrolyte -- a substance that can become thicker under impact, set between the battery's anode and cathode that will be impact-resistant, thus not causing a fire or an explosion upon any collision.
Photovoltaic nanotubes
Physicists discovered a novel kind of nanotube that generates current in the presence of light.
New species of rock-eating shipworm identified in freshwater river in the Philippines
A newly identified genus and species of worm-like, freshwater clam, commonly known as a shipworm, eats rock and expels sand as scat while it burrows like an ecosystem engineer in the Abatan River in the Philippines.
US military consumes more hydrocarbons than most countries -- massive hidden impact on climate
Research by social scientists from Durham University and Lancaster University shows the US military is one of the largest climate polluters in history, consuming more liquid fuels and emitting more CO2e (carbon-dioxide equivalent) than most countries.
Memories form 'barrier' to letting go of objects for people who hoard
Researchers hope that the findings could help develop new ways to train people with hoarding difficulties to discard clutter.
Statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke and possibly other cardiovascular complications in cancer patients following radiation
Cancer patients who took statin medication had a 32% reduction in stroke following radiation therapy to the chest, head or neck.
Study reveals key locations for declining songbird
Many of North America's migratory songbirds are declining at alarming rates.
A sound idea: a step towards quantum computing
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba and the University of Pittsburgh have developed a new method for using lasers to create tiny lattice waves inside silicon crystals that can encode quantum information.
Climate change could affect symbiotic relationships between microorganisms and trees
An international research consortium mapped the global distribution of tree-root symbioses with fungi and bacteria that are vital to forest ecosystems.
Developing a new type of refrigeration via force-driven liquid gas transition
A research team of Tohoku University, Nissan Motor Co., Shinshu University, and Okayama University made a groundbreaking discovery in the quest to replace hydrofluorocarbons in refrigeration systems with natural refrigerants such as water and alcohol.
Unexpected culprit -- wetlands as source of methane
Knowing how emissions are created can help reduce them.
Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress
When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures.
Finding 'Nemo's' family tree of anemones
Thanks in part to the popular film Finding Nemo, clownfishes are well known to the public and well represented in scientific literature.
Scientists identify genes associated with biliary atresia survival
Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have identified an expression pattern of 14 genes at the time of diagnosis that predicts two year, transplant-free survival in children with biliary atresia -- the most common diagnosis leading to liver transplants in children.
Curbing the flammability of epoxy resin
How to improve the flame retardant performance of two-dimensional flame retardants?
Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals
Researchers from the UAB and the IMIM published in Scientific Reports the first evidence in a non-human species, the domestic dog, of a relation between joint hypermobility and excitability: dogs with more joint mobility and flexibility tend to have more anxiety problems.
Your nose knows when it comes to stronger memories
Memories are stronger when the original experiences are accompanied by unpleasant odors, a team of researchers has found.
'Goldilocks' neurons promote REM sleep
It has been a mystery why REM sleep, or dream sleep, increases when the room temper-ature is 'just right'.
Study: Behavior in kindergarten associated with earnings in adulthood
New study found that individuals who were inattentive at age 6 had lower earnings in their 30s after taking into consideration their IQ and family adversity.
Study reveals global disparities in cervical cancer rates among women with HIV
A new International Journal of Cancer study indicates that rates of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) are particularly high in women living with HIV in South Africa or Latin America.
OU physicists show novel Mott state in twisted graphene bilayers at 'magic angle'
A University of Oklahoma physics group sheds light on a novel Mott state observed in twisted graphene bilayers at the 'magic angle' in a recent study just published in Physical Review Letters.
'Alexa, monitor my heart': Researchers develop first contactless cardiac arrest AI system for smart speakers
Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new tool to monitor people for cardiac arrest while they're asleep without touching them.
Family and community central to recovery of Sierra Leone's former child soldiers
Many of Sierra Leone's former child soldiers have gradually earned greater acceptance from families and communities, according to a sweeping new study of their adult lives.
Perfect quantum portal emerges at exotic interface
Researchers at the University of Maryland have captured the most direct evidence to date of Klein tunneling, a quantum quirk that allows particles to tunnel through a barrier like it's not even there.
Scaffold helps cells repair torn meniscus in lab tests
About a million times a year, Americans with a torn meniscus in their knee undergo surgery in hopes of a repair.
How information is like snacks, money, and drugs -- to your brain
A new study by researchers at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business has found that information acts on the brain's dopamine-producing reward system in the same way as money or food.
New international initiative stresses need for global action on air pollution
The National Academies of Sciences and Medicine from South Africa, Brazil, Germany, and the United States of America have joined forces to issue an urgent call to action on harmful air pollution.
Plate tectonics may have driven 'Cambrian Explosion, study shows
The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist.
Study predicts more long-term sea level rise from Greenland ice
Greenland's melting ice sheet could generate more sea level rise than previously thought if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase and warm the atmosphere at their current rate, according to a new modeling study.
Mapping and measuring proteins on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells
Researchers from Kanazawa University on the development of a technique to closely track a specific protein on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells.
Many asylum seekers suffer from depression and anxiety symptoms
According to the internationally most extensive population study concerning the health of asylum seekers, up to 40% of the adults who have sought asylum in Finland told that they are suffering from major depression and anxiety symptoms.
FEFU scientist reported on concentration of pesticides in marine organisms
According to ecotoxicologist from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), from the 90s and during 2000s in the tissues of Russian Far Eastern mussels the concentration of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) that had been globally used in agriculture in the mid-twentieth century has increased about ten times.
The new great wave
Radical Inkless Technology produces the world's smallest 'Ukiyo-e' and promises to revolutionize how we print.
Marine microbiology -- Successful extremists
In nutrient-poor deep-sea sediments, microbes belonging to the Archaea have outcompeted bacterial microorganisms for millions of years.
Reconfigurable multi-organ-on-a-chip system reliably evaluates chemotherapy toxicity
Christopher McAleer and colleagues have created a new multiorgan-on-a-chip system that can accurately capture the toxic effects of chemotherapies that have been metabolized by the liver -- effects usually not seen in standard cell culture preclinical drug development.
Shimmer and ClearSky announce partnership to improve analysis of wearable sensor data for CNS diseases
This partnership will employ Shimmer's Verisense™ wearable sensors platform, which has been designed specifically for use in clinical research, with ClearSky algorithms and machine learning to transform wearables data into actionable insights for central nervous system (CNS) diseases.
Vitamin D supplementation not associated with reduced cardiovascular events
This study, called a meta-analysis, combined the results of 21 randomized clinical trials with about 83,000 patients to look at whether vitamin D supplementation was associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease events such as heart attack or stroke.
Investigating coral and algal 'matchmaking' at the cellular level
What factors govern algae's success as 'tenants' of their coral hosts both under optimal conditions and when oceanic temperatures rise?
Real-time analysis of MOF adsorption behavior
Researchers have developed a technology to analyze the adsorption behavior of molecules in each individual pore of a metal organic framework (MOF).
Distinguishing helpful and harmful gut immune cells offers new view on inflammatory diseases
A type of immune cell that contributes to inflammatory bowel disease exists in two forms, 'good' and 'bad.' A new Crick-led study in Immunity has characterized these distinct populations, which could help scientists to develop treatments targeting inflammation while preserving healthy gut function.
Secure quantum communications in the microwave range for the first time
Mikel Sanz, of the Physical Chemistry Department of UPV/EHU, leads the theoretical group for an experiment published by the prestigious magazine, Nature Communications.
Biochar may boost carbon storage, but benefits to germination and growth appear scant
Biochar may not be the miracle soil additive that many farmers and researchers hoped it to be, according to a new University of Illinois study.
A 3D view of climatic behavior at the third pole
Research across several areas of the 'Third Pole' -- the high-mountain region centered on the Tibetan Plateau -- shows a seasonal cycle in how near-surface temperature changes with elevation.
Synthetic joint lubricant holds promise for osteoarthritis
A new type of treatment for osteoarthritis, currently in canine clinical trials, shows promise for eventual use in humans.
Researchers find quantum gravity has no symmetry
Using holography, researchers have found when gravity is combined with quantum mechanics, symmetry is not possible.
Motherhood can deliver body image boost -- new study
New research indicates that perfectionism is related to breast size dissatisfaction, but only in non-mothers -- suggesting that mothers are more comfortable with their bodies.
Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces
Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts.
New research shows importance of climate on spruce beetle flight
If the climate continues warming as predicted, spruce beetle outbreaks in the Rocky Mountains could become more frequent.
Astronomers uncover first polarized radio signals from gamma-ray burst
An international team of astronomers has captured the first-ever polarized radio waves from a distant cosmic explosion.
Sedation method does not affect colonoscopy detection rate
Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States and colonoscopy is the most-used screening tool to detect it.
Study findings highlight the need for diversity in genomic research
Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, and a number of other academic centers have analyzed the genomes of nearly 50,000 non-European individuals to maximize genetic discovery and lessen clinical disparities.
Efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels from glucose
Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel, with one-step direct fermentative production.
Simple scan could direct treatments for angina
A 40 minute test for angina could help patients avoid an overnight stay in hospital, according to research funded by the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre.
Upcycling process brings new life to old jeans
A growing population, rising standards of living and quickly changing fashions send mountains of clothing waste to the world's landfills each year.
Successful 'alien' bird invasions are location dependent
Whether 'alien' bird species thrive in a new habitat depends more on the environmental conditions than the population size or characteristics of the invading bird species, finds a new UCL-led study.
US beekeepers lost over 40% of colonies last year, highest winter losses ever recorded
Beekeepers across the United States lost 40.7% of their honey bee colonies from April 2018 to April 2019, according to preliminary results of the latest annual nationwide survey conducted by the University of Maryland-led nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership.
New approaches cut inappropriate antibiotic use by over 30%
A UC Davis study of nine emergency departments and urgent care centers in California and Colorado found educating physicians and patients about safe antibiotic use can cut overuse by one-third.
From one brain scan, more information for medical artificial intelligence
MIT researchers have devised a novel method to glean training information for machine-learning models, including those that can analyze medical images to help diagnose and treat brain conditions.
New research shows an iceless Greenland may be in our future
New research from the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute shows that Greenland may be ice-free by the year 3000.
A miniature robot that could check colons for early signs of disease
Engineers have shown it is technically possible to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take micro-ultrasound images.
Study: Eyes hold clues for treating severe autism more effectively
In a new study, researchers demonstrate that assessment tools capturing implicit signs of word knowledge among those with severe autism like eye movement can be more accurate than traditional assessments of vocabulary, pointing the way toward better inventions and spurring much needed new research.
Research shows wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat
We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the most important of habitats: their nests.
Is glue the answer to climate change?
A small amount of cheap epoxy resin replaces bulky support materials in making effective carbon capture solid sorbents, developed by scientists at the Energy Safety Research Institute of Swansea University.
Lack of diversity in genomic research hinders precision medicine for nonwhite Americans
A team of researchers from institutions across the country, including the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, analyzed phenotypes of nearly 50,000 non-European individuals, identifying 65 new associations and replicating 1,400 associations between genes and diseases, highlighting the need for equitable inclusion of diverse populations in genetic research.
Kazan University Clinic testing biodegradable plant-based implants
The prosthetics technology is based on potato and corn materials which serve as 'food' for the replaced tissues and can be slowly absorbed by the patient's own tissue.
Research discovery leads to new clinical trial for myelofibrosis patients
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) discovered in laboratory studies that an experimental drug called selinexor may block a crucial survival pathway exploited by myelofibrosis cells.
Researchers find cause of rare, fatal disease that turns babies' lips and skin blue
Scientists used a gene editing method called CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mice that faithfully mimic a fatal respiratory disorder in newborn infants that turns their lips and skin blue.
Directed evolution comes to plants
Accelerating plant evolution with CRISPR paves the way for breeders to engineer new crop varieties.
How bacteria protect themselves from plasma treatment
Considering the ever-growing percentage of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, interest in medical use of plasma is increasing.
High reaction rates even without precious metals
Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production.
People with multiple physical conditions have faster brain decline, higher suicide risk
Researchers have developed a way to measure the impact of living with multiple chronic illnesses - a situation called multimorbidity.
In ovarian cancer care, focus on high-volume centers could come at a cost
Barring ovarian cancer surgery at low-volume hospitals could limit access to care for many rural and underserved patients, a new study has found.
Vitamin D may not help your heart
While previous research has suggested a link between low levels of vitamin D in the blood and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, a new Michigan State University study has found that taking vitamin D supplements did not reduce that risk.
Antarctic marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction
A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs.
Serotonin linked to somatic awareness, a condition long thought to be imaginary
An international team spearheaded by researchers at McGill University has discovered a biological mechanism that could explain heightened somatic awareness, a condition where patients experience physical discomforts for which there is no physiological explanation.
Researchers find potential way to prevent most common pregnancy-related conditions
A new finding from University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers, published in the June issue of the journal Endocrinology, could have important implications for developing novel treatments to prevent placental abnormalities.
Patients of surgeons with unprofessional behavior more likely to suffer complications
Patients of surgeons with higher numbers of reports from co-workers about unprofessional behavior are significantly more likely to experience complications during or after their operations, researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) reported today in JAMA Surgery.
Scientists chart course toward a new world of synthetic biology
A UC Berkeley team with NSF funding has compiled a roadmap for the future of synthetic or engineering biology, based on the input of 80 leaders in the field from more than 30 institutions.
Research brief: Stabilizing nations' food production through crop diversity
With increasing demand for food from the planet's growing population and climate change threatening the stability of food systems across the world, University of Minnesota research examined how the diversity of crops at the national level could increase the harvest stability of all crops in a nation.
New study highlights need for ethnic and ancestral diversity in genomic research
A new multicenter analysis led by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and other institutions found the inclusion of diverse, multiethnic populations in large-scale genomic studies is critical for reducing health disparities and accurately representing genetics-related disease risks in all populations.
Direct method to etch-embed Ce onto Cu-based Oxide
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, a team of researchers from Nanchang University have attempted to directly engineer the surface structure of Cu-based substrate to get a series of Ce-O-Cu catalysts for NH3-SCR of NO.
Reports of unprofessional behavior by surgeons and risk of complications for patients
This observational study looked at whether patients whose surgeons were more often reported by coworkers for unprofessional behavior were at greater risk of postoperative complications.
Expanding the temperature range of lithium-ion batteries
Electric cars struggle with extreme temperatures, mainly because of impacts on the electrolyte solutions in their lithium-ion batteries.
Certain behaviors in kindergarten associated with lower adult salary
Inattention among kindergarteners was associated with lower earnings as adults in this study based on behavioral ratings from kindergarten teachers for 2,850 children in Canada at ages 5 or 6 and government tax returns for those same children as adults at ages 33 to 35.
South African forests show pathways to a sustainable future
Native forests make up 1percent of the landscape in South Africa but could play a key role in reducing atmospheric carbon and identifying sustainable development practices that can be used globally to counter climate change, according to a Penn State researcher.
New research finds increased CT use for suspected urolithiasis patients in ED
A new study performed in conjunction with the Harvey L.
SUTD researchers enhance security in proof of stake blockchain protocols
Proof of Stake Blockchain protocols rely on voting mechanisms to reach consensus on the data, but they can be vulnerable to faults when validators accidentally or maliciously withhold their votes.
High postural sway doubles older women's fracture risk
Postural sway is an independent risk factor for bone fractures in postmenopausal women, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital.
Inattentive children will earn less money at 35
An international team led by Université de Montréal researchers finds that if kids can't pay attention in kindergarten, they will grow up to have less lucrative careers.
Study finds similar cardiovascular outcomes for generic, brand-name drugs for hypothyroidism
A new study by Mayo Clinic researchers may have broad implications for treatment of patients with predominantly benign thyroid disease and newly treated hypothyroidism.
Frog protein may mitigate dangers posed by toxic marine microbes
A new study from UC San Francisco suggests that a protein found in the common bullfrog may one day be used to detect and neutralize a poisonous compound produced by red tides and other harmful algal blooms.
Making systems robust
Both nature and technology rely on integral feedback mechanisms to ensure that systems resist external perturbations.
First step towards a better prosthetic leg? Trip people over and over
The first step a Vanderbilt team took in addressing a challenge in lower-body prosthetics was coming to understand the way people with two legs catch themselves, accomplished by covering test subjects with motion-capturing sensors.
Studying diverse populations can boost genetic discovery, curb health disparities
Studying diverse, multi-ethnic populations can increase genetic discoveries and reduce health disparities, according to one of the largest genetic studies of Hispanics and Latinos, African-Americans, Asians and other minorities.
Sickle cell drug showing promise in clinical trial
An investigational drug for the treatment of sickle cell disease is showing early promise in clinical trials for impacting biomarkers of the disease in patients, reported UConn School of Medicine researchers.
Fatty fish without environmental pollutants protect against type 2 diabetes
If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Overlooked: How pumping groundwater impacts streams and vegetation
Pumping groundwater for uses like irrigation has decreased streamflow and plant water availability in the United States, according to the first large-scale simulation of surface water systems' sensitivity to water changes below ground.
Whites' racial prejudice can lessen over time, research shows
Prejudice among white people can lessen over time, according to new research from Rice University.
Study of multiethnic genomes identifies 27 genetic variants associated with disease
Researchers have identified 27 new genomic variants associated with conditions such as blood pressure, type II diabetes, cigarette use and chronic kidney disease in diverse populations.
Deep submersible dives shed light on rarely explored coral reefs
A new paper examines the rarely explored coral reefs in deep water, where less than 1% of light from the surface makes it through.
Concordia researchers develop new method to evaluate artificial heart valves
Using high-tech equipment to look at the flow downstream of a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve, researchers at Concordia have devised a technique to detect obstructions in a type of mechanical heart valve they believe will contribute to safer follow-up methods for cardiologists and their patients.
Owner training key to reducing risk of dog bite injuries
Dog attacks have been on the rise and it may the owners who need to go back to school.
First events in stem cells becoming specialized cells needed for organ development
Cell biologists at the University of Toronto shed light on the very first step stem cells go through to turn into the specialized cells that make up organs.
Researchers learn dangerous brain parasite 'orders in' for dinner
Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have discovered how toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled parasite, maintains a steady supply of nutrients while replicating inside of its host cell: it calls for delivery.
A songbird's fate hinges on one fragile area
Researchers were surprised to find that a migratory songbird that breeds in the eastern and central United States is concentrated during winter in just one South American country.
Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do
Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report.
New platform flips traditional on-demand supply chain approach on its head
Research recently published in Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, by systems engineers at Rensselaer, demonstrated how a hierarchical model that provides suppliers with a certain amount of choice could improve supply and demand matching for underutilized resources--and may even transform what's become known as the sharing economy.
State initiative to address disparities in mother's milk for very low birth weight infants
A new study, published in Pediatrics, indicates that the initiative yielded positive results on improving rates of prenatal human milk education, early milk expression and skin to skin care among mothers of very low birth weight infants during initial hospitalization, but did not lead to sustained improvement in mother's milk provision at hospital discharge.
News from the diamond nursery
Unlike flawless gems, fibrous diamonds often contain small saline inclusions.
Overcoming PTSD: Study reveals memory disruption drug target
A new study suggests it may be possible to disarm the emotional memories of trauma that drive PTSD symptoms.
104th Annual Meeting: Preview and highlights
The following selected sessions and events at the Annual Meeting delve into this year's meeting theme.
Reanalysis of clinical molecular data yields new genetic diagnoses
Reanalysis of clinical exome sequencing data can efficiently increase the molecular diagnostic rate of undiagnosed diseases.
Freezing bubbles viral video inspired research published
The mesmerizing sight of ice crystals floating around the bubble made the engineers wonder what caused the phenomenon
First-ever successful mind-controlled robotic arm without brain implants
A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University has made a breakthrough in the field of noninvasive robotic device control.
Scientists demonstrate the advantages of diverse populations when compiling genetic data
Relying strictly on genetic data from those of European descent, rather than more diverse populations, can exacerbate existing disease and increase health care disparities, according to new research.
Mobile crisis service reduces youth ER visits for behavioral health needs, says study
Children and youth with acute behavioral health needs who are seen through Connecticut's Mobile Crisis Intervention Service -- a community-based program that provides mental health interventions and services to patients 18 years and younger -- have a lower risk of experiencing a follow-up episode and are less likely to show up in an emergency room if and when another episode occurs.
The dynamics of workplace sexual harassment in the US
A new Gender, Work & Organization analysis of US data from 1997-2016 provides new insights into workplace sexual harassment.
Unearthing the sweet potato proteome
The sweet, starchy orange sweet potatoes are tasty and nutritious ingredients for fries, casseroles and pies.

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