Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 21, 2019


Americans still eat too much processed meat and too little fish
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that the amount of processed meat consumed by Americans has remained unchanged in the past 18 years, nor has their intake of fish/shellfish increased.
'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin
MIT chemical engineers have devised a new way to create nanoemulsions, very tiny droplets of one liquid suspended within another.
Keeping children safe in the 'Internet of Things' age
Children need protection when using programmable Internet computing devices -- and Lancaster University scientists have drawn up new guidelines to help designers build in safeguards.
Stresses from past earthquakes explain location of seismic events
A study published in Nature Communications suggests the cumulative stresses caused by historic earthquakes could provide some explanation as to why and where they occur.
Ericsson activates 5G NSA technology at 5TONIC open innovation lab
The deployment, successfully achieved by Ericsson and Telefónica, includes a new 5G Massive MIMO Radio running on 3.5GHz band, along with virtual Evolved Packet Core and User Data Consolidation.
Structural development of the brain
In a recent study published in The Journal of Neuroscience, researchers reveal how the basic structure of the brain is formed.
Do women regret embryo testing before IVF?
By the time a woman is 44 years old, the vast majority of her embryos will be abnormal.
'Sneezing' plants contribute to disease proliferation
'''The jumping droplets, at the rate of 100 or more an hour, are a violent expulsion of dew from the surface.
Washable electronic textiles to usher in an era of even smarter wearable products
With the wearable electronic device market having firmly established itself in the 21st century, active research is being conducted on electronic textiles, which are textiles (e.g. clothing) capable of functioning like electronic devices.
Plant-based diet leads to Crohn's Disease remission, according to case study
Eating a plant-based diet may be an effective treatment for Crohn's disease, according to a case study published in the journal Nutrients.
Your brain activity can be used to measure how well you understand a concept
As students learn a new concept, measuring how well they grasp it has often depended on traditional paper and pencil tests.
Neuroscience research questions current alcohol limit
The research adds weight to calls for a lowered alcohol limit for drivers.
From sheep and cattle to giraffes, genome study reveals evolution of ruminants
A detailed study of the genomes of 44 species of ruminants gives new insight into the evolution and success of these mammals.
Newly discovered immune cells at the frontline of HIV infection
Researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research have discovered brand new immune cells that are at the frontline of HIV infection.
Parental care has forced great crested grebes to lay eggs with an eye on seagulls
Ornithologists from St Petersburg University, Elmira Zaynagutdinova and Yuriy Mikhailov, studied the features of the great crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus) nesting in the nature reserve 'North Coast of the Neva Bay'.
Color change and behavior enable multi-colored chameleon prawns to survive
Chameleon prawns change color to camouflage themselves as the seaweed around them changes seasonally, new research shows.
Foodie calls: Dating for a free meal (rather than a relationship)
New psychology research reveals 23-33% of women in an online study say they've engaged in a 'foodie call,' where they set up a date for a free meal.
Hydrogen-natural gas hydrates harvested by natural gas
A recent study has suggested a new strategy for stably storing hydrogen, using natural gas as a stabilizer.
Embryonic microRNA fuels heart cell regeneration, Temple researchers show
By adulthood, the heart is no longer able to replenish injured or diseased cells.
Pathogenesis and treatment of periodontitis: Honoring the legacy of Ricardo Teles
The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and American Association for Dental Research (AADR) honored the legacy of Ricardo Teles in a symposium at the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR, held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American AADR and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR).
Shaken and stirred: Scientists capture the deformation effect of shock waves on a material
Understanding how shock waves affect structures is crucial for advancements in material science research, including safety protocols and novel surface modifications.
Media alert: New articles in The CRISPR Journal from MIT, Harvard, Editas, and others
The CRISPR Journal announces the publication of its June 2019 issue with articles from MIT, Harvard, Editas, Inscripta, and others.
Gender-specific differences in the salivary microbiome of caries-active children
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Stephanie Ortiz, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA, gave a poster presentation on 'Gender-specific Differences in the Salivary Microbiome of Caries-active Children.'
Ageism reduced by education, intergenerational contact
Researchers at Cornell University have shown for the first time that it is possible to reduce ageist attitudes, prejudices and stereotypes through education and intergenerational contact.
Discovery of the cell fate switch from neurons to astrocytes in the developing brain
During mammalian brain development, neural precursor cells first generate neurons and later astrocytes.
Experiments with salt-tolerant bacteria in brine have implications for life on Mars
Salt-tolerant bacteria grown in brine were able to revive after the brine was put through a cycle of drying and rewetting.
Combination of drugs may combat deadly drug-resistant fungus
Microbiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have shown that a combination of anti-fungal and anti-bacterial medications may be an effective weapon against the recently discovered multidrug resistant, Candida auris (C. auris).
Scientists map huge undersea fresh-water aquifer off US Northeast
In a new survey of the sub-seafloor off the US Northeast coast, scientists have made a surprising discovery: a gigantic aquifer of relatively fresh water trapped in porous sediments lying below the salty ocean.
Ice lithography: opportunities and challenges in 3D nanofabrication
The history and progress of ice lithography (IL), and its applications in 3D nanofabrication are reviewed.
Skin bacteria could save frogs from virus
Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests.
Northern lights' social networking reveals true scale of magnetic storms
Magnetic disturbances caused by phenomena like the northern lights can be tracked by a 'social network' of ground-based instruments, according to a new study from the University of Warwick.
Antibiotic resistance in spore-forming probiotic bacteria
New research has found that six probiotic Bacillus strains are resistant to several antibiotics.
Cities are key to saving monarch butterflies
Monarch butterflies are at risk of disappearing from most of the US, and to save them, we need to plant milkweed for them to lay their eggs on.
Cytotoxicity and physical properties of glass ionomer cement containing flavonoids
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Aline de Castilho, University of Campinas, Brazil, presented a poster on 'Cytotoxicity and Physical Properties of Glass Ionomer Cement Containing Flavonoids.'
NASA helps warn of harmful algal blooms in lakes, reservoirs
With limited resources to monitor often-unpredictable algae blooms, water managers are turning to new technologies from NASA and its partners to detect and keep track of potential hazards.
Scientists make a discovery that may explain some forms of stroke
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a novel behaviour of the blood vessels of the brain in zebrafish that may explain some forms of stroke in humans.
The key to unlock bacterial fusion
Researchers identify how a Chlamydia-produced protein helps bacterial compartments fuse together, thus increasing pathogenicity.
Next-gen solar cells spin in new direction
A nanomaterial made from phosphorus, known as phosphorene, is shaping up as a key ingredient for more sustainable and efficient next-generation perovskite solar cells.
Mystery of immunosuppressive drug's biosynthesis finally unlocked
The biogenesis of mycophenolic acid (MPA), an old and important molecule, has remained an unsolved mystery for more than a century.
Virtual reality takes a leap into taste
optoPAD is a newly developed system for creating virtual taste realities.
Survey of dental researchers' perceptions of sexual harassment at AADR conferences
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), AADR Immediate Past President Raul Garcia, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA, presented a poster on 'Survey of Dental Researchers' Perceptions of Sexual Harassment at AADR Conferences 2015-2018.'
The pressure difference and vortex flow of blood in the heart chambers may signal heart dysfunction
Japanese scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Teikyo University of Science, and Juntendo University have found -- in animal studies -- a close relationship between vortex flow and pressure differences in the ventricles, or lower chambers, of the heart.
Dissemination of pathogenic bacteria by university student's cell phones
New research has demonstrated the presence of S. aureus in 40% of the cell phones of students sampled at a university.
Researchers report new understanding of thermoelectric materials
Researchers reported a major step forward in the search for new thermoelectric materials Friday, the discovery of a new explanation for asymmetrical thermoelectric performance.
Blue pigment from engineered fungi could help turn the textile industry green
A new biosynthetic production pathway developed by scientists at the Joint BioEnergy Institute could provide a sustainable alternative to conventional synthetic blue dye.
Scientists dissolve crude oil in water to study its composition
Researchers from MIPT, Skoltech, the Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lomonosov Moscow State University have offered a new approach to oil composition analysis.
A new drug target for chemically induced Parkinson's disease
An enzyme that modifies chemicals formed in the body by alcohol, tobacco, and certain foods may be a new target for treating Parkinson's disease, according to a team led by University of Pennsylvania scientists.
Researchers find new mutation in the leptin gene
Texas Biomed Staff Scientist Raul Bastarrachea, M.D., is part of a team that discovered a new mutation in the gene that regulates the key hormone suppressing hunger called leptin.
Dental microwear provides clues to dietary habits of lepidosauria
High-resolution microscopic images of the surface of dental enamel of lepidosauria, which is a subclass of reptiles including monitor lizards, iguanas, lizards, and tuatara, allow scientists to determine their dietary habits.
Autoimmunity and chair-side risk assessment of temporomandibular disorders
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), many oral and poster presentations centered around temporomandibular disorders, or TMD.
Exposure to others' suffering even worse than being shot at
War veterans who were not personally in life-threatening danger have more psychological problems than those who were injured by gunfire, according to a study that surveyed Norwegian veterans after their return from Afghanistan.
Researchers discover traditional fluid flow observations may miss the big picture
Before and after comparisons don't tell the full story of chemical reactions in flowing fluids, such as those in drug delivery systems, according to a new study from a collaboration between Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) and Nihon University based in Japan.
Reforming pharmacy benefit manager practices may lead to drug cost savings
Efforts to control health care costs in the United States often focus on the listed prescription drug prices, but unregulated pharmacy benefit manager practices also may contribute to escalating expenses, according to a perspective published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Immunology -- not just supporting actors
Non-classical monocytes were long thought to play a purely surveillance role in the immune system.
Hubble captures elusive, irregular galaxy
IC 10 is a remarkable object. It is the closest-known starburst galaxy, meaning that it is undergoing a furious bout of star formation fueled by ample supplies of cool hydrogen gas.
Neural networks taught to recognize similar objects on videos without accuracy degradation
Andrey Savchenko, Professor at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University), has developed a method that can help to enhance image identification on videos.
Sexual hormone oestradiol protects female brain in mid-life
How do sex hormones and body weight affect emotional and cognitive well-being?

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...