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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 23, 2019


The solution to antibiotic resistance could be in your kitchen sponge
Researchers from the New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) have discovered bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, living in their kitchen sponges.
Cannabidiol is a powerful new antibiotic
New research has found that Cannnabidiol is active against Gram-positive bacteria, including those responsible for many serious infections (such as Staphyloccocus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae), with potency similar to that of established antibiotics such as vancomycin or daptomycin.
Prolonged transmission of a resistant bacterial strain in a Northern California hospital
Researchers have used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to demonstrate transmission of a single bacterial strain that possessed a carbapenem-resistance gene in a northern California hospital.
Understanding C. auris transmission with the healthcare environment
Researchers have now shown that patients who are heavily colonized with Candida auris on their skin can shed the fungus and contaminate their surroundings.
Branching out: Making graphene from gum trees
Researchers have developed a cost-effective and eco-friendly way of producing graphene using one of Australia's most abundant resources, eucalyptus trees.
Frozen sperm retains its viability in outer space conditions
Zillionaires like Amazon founder Jeff Bezos who see the 'colonization' of space as an answer to the Earth's ever threatened resources will be reassured to learn that human sperm retains its complete viability within the different gravitational conditions found in outer space.
Novel noninvasive molecular imaging for monitoring rheumatoid arthritis
A first-in-human Phase 1/Phase II study demonstrates that intravenous administration of the radiopharmaceutical imaging agent technetium-99m (99mTc) tilmanocept promises to be a safe, well-tolerated, noninvasive means of monitoring rheumatoid arthritis disease activity.
Querying big data just got universal
A universal query engine for big data that works across computing platforms could accelerate analytics research.

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