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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 24, 2019


More energy needed to cope with climate change
A new study published today in Nature Communications by researchers from IIASA, Boston University, and the Ca' Foscari University of Venice found that by mid-century climate change will increase the demand for energy globally, even with modest warming.
Culture shapes how we learn to reason?
New research in the US and China suggests there isn't a universal trajectory for how abstract thought develops in children -- and that cultural environment may play a role.
Nutrition is the missing ingredient in home health today, new study shows
For nearly 5 million Americans a year, home healthcare is critical as they recover from illness or injury.
Can deprescribing drugs linked to cognitive impairment actually reduce risk of dementia?
A JAMA Internal Medicine commentary by three Regenstrief Institute research scientists calls for randomized deprescribing trials to address anticholinergic drug use as a potentially modifiable and reversible risk factor for dementia, a growing public health issue.
Suicide, accidents, and hepatitis: The leading causes of death for Veterans in their first year of PTSD treatment
According to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, United States Veterans seeking treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at increased risk of death compared with the general population.
Researchers identify new hunger pathway in the brain
A newly identified hunger pathway in the brain can quickly modify food intake in the presence of food, according to a study of mice published in JNeurosci.
PSU study finds people prefer to donate time -- even when charities lose out
Each year during the holiday season, soup kitchens and charities alike are flooded with offers to volunteer.
Alzheimer's missing link ID'd, answering what tips brain's decline
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that immune cells that typically protect neurons from damage may be the link between early and late brain changes in Alzheimer's disease.
Government-funded research increasingly fuels innovation
A quantitative analysis going back over a period of more than 90 years shows that almost a third of patents in the U.S. rely on federal research funding.
Gene networks reveal transition from healthy to failing heart, Stanford-led study shows
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators have created one of the first maps to reveal gene activity and connectivity as the heart shuts down.
Additions, deletions, & changes to the official list of North American birds
The latest supplement to the American Ornithological Society's checklist of North and Middle American birds is being published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, and it includes several major updates to the organization of the continent's bird species.
Be prepared: Prioritising invasive species for strategic prevention (Durban, South Africa)
Alien species management in cities can be a difficult and costly endeavour.
Certain cells secrete a substance in the brain that protects neurons, USC study finds
USC researchers have discovered a secret sauce in the brain's vascular system that preserves the neurons needed to keep dementia and other diseases at bay.
New reports provide guidance for obesity care
Advocates for obesity prevention and treatment have designed two new resources for medical educators, healthcare providers and community programs that will enhance the level of care for patients, according to two new studies published online today in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society.
An 'awe-full' state of mind can set you free
An induced feeling of awe, or state of wonder, may be the best strategy yet for alleviating the discomfort that comes from uncertain waiting.
Wearable technology to personalize Lu-177-DOTATATE therapy for NETs
Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, are developing a user-friendly (worn at home) vest with technology that collects data to tailor personalized therapy for patients with metastatic, somatostatin-receptor-2 positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).
Researchers unveil how soft materials react to deformation at molecular level
Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation.
Large cohort study confirms small added obstetric risk from transfer of longer developed embryos
The transfer of embryos cultured for five or six days (instead of two or three) after fertilisation in IVF and ICSI has become routine in many fertility clinics.
Survivors of childhood brain tumors experience lasting cognitive and socioeconomic burdens
Survivors of childhood brain tumors who received radiotherapy and were very young at the time of diagnosis may experience cognitive and socioeconomic burdens decades after treatment, according to a study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.
Music students do better in school than non-musical peers
High school students who take music courses score significantly better on math, science and English exams than their non-musical peers, according to a new study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology.
Mathematics ties media coverage of gun control to upticks in gun purchases
For the first time, researchers have shown a causal link between print news media coverage of US gun control policy in the wake of mass shooting events and increases in firearm acquisition, particularly in states with the least restrictive gun laws.
Small shops, heavy advertisers less likely to ID for tobacco
'Our findings suggest that certain types of stores -- tobacco shops, convenience stores and those with a lot of tobacco advertising -- are more likely to sell tobacco to a young person without checking his or her ID.'
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Methods used 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new Imperial College London research.
Tropical soil disturbance could be hidden source of CO2
Florida State researchers working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo found a link between the churning of deep soils during deforestation and the release of carbon dioxide through streams and rivers.
Long duration of sperm freezing makes no difference to live birth rates in large sperm bank study
Despite a time limit imposed in many countries on the freeze-storage of sperm, a new study from China has found that the long-term cryopreservation of semen in a sperm bank does not affect future clinical outcomes.
Play games with no latency
One of the most challenging issues for game players looks to be resolved soon with the introduction of a zero-latency gaming environment.
New therapy targets gut bacteria to prevent and reverse food allergies
A new study, led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital, identifies the species of bacteria in the human infant gut that protect against food allergies, finding changes associated with the development of food allergies and an altered immune response.
New therapy promotes vascular repair following stroke
Following a stroke, antibodies that inhibit the signaling molecule Nogo-A can help repair blood vessels in the affected brain regions.
Resonance-enhanced tunneling induces F+H2 reaction in interstellar clouds
Scientists from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators investigated the mechanism of rapid reactivity of the F + H2 reaction at low temperature and found that rapid reactivity was actually induced by resonance-enhanced tunneling.
Study ties poor sleep to reduced memory performance in older adults
A new study has found that variability in night-to-night sleep time and reduced sleep quality adversely affect the ability of older adults to recall information about past events.
Seeing the doctor? Relax, you'll remember more
Some patients feel shame, anxiety or fear immediately before seeing their doctor, making them tense.
Suicide rates are rising significantly among African American teens
A large-scale study from The University of Toledo of young African Americans found a 182 percent increase in suicide deaths among females and a 60 percent increase among males.
Engineering enzymes to turn plant waste into sustainable products
A new family of enzymes has been engineered to perform one of the most important steps in the conversion of plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics and chemicals.
Combatting the world's deadliest infections using groundbreaking human-mimetic tools
A new article published today in the journal Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology shows that research built around human-mimetic tools are more likely to succeed in the search for effective treatments for and prevention of flavivirus infection as compared to research using monkeys or other animals as laboratory models.
Chemists discover structure of glucagon fibrils
Study may be a step toward shelf-stable versions of the hormone, which is used to control diabetes.
Study investigates role of family doctors in advanced therapies
A group of researchers at the University of Granada has conducted a study into the knowledge and attitudes of Family Medicine residents, in relation to the so-called 'advanced therapies'.
Molecular scissors stabilize the cell's cytoskeleton
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Villigen, Switzerland, have for the first time elucidated the structure of important enzymes in human cells that alter essential building blocks of the cellular cytoskeleton.
Close-range blast exposure & neurodegenerative processes among those with genetic risk for AD
A new study raises the possibility that close-range blast exposure among veterans with a genetically higher risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), may make them more susceptible to degradation of their white matter, the part of the brain made of fiber connections called axons that connect nerve cells.
Physical evidence in the brain for types of schizophrenia
In a study using brain tissue from deceased human donors, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they found new evidence that schizophrenia can be marked by the buildup of abnormal proteins similar to those found in the brains of people with such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer's or Huntington's diseases.
Hydrogel offers double punch against orthopedic bone infections
Surgery prompted by automobile accidents, combat wounds, cancer treatment and other conditions can lead to bone infections that are difficult to treat and can delay healing until they are resolved.
SLAS Discovery announces its July feature article, '3D Cell-Based Assays for Drug Screens: Challenges in Imaging, Image Analysis, and High-Content Analysis'
In July's SLAS Discovery feature article, '3D Cell-Based Assays for Drug Screens: Challenges in Imaging, Image Analysis, and High-Content Analysis,' Tijmen H.
Fake news 'vaccine' works: 'Pre-bunking' game reduces susceptibility to disinformation
Study of thousands of players shows a simple online game works like a 'vaccine,' increasing skepticism of fake news by giving people a 'weak dose' of the methods behind disinformation.
Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin
Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia.
Speeding up single-cell genomics research
Time-saving method makes it possible to profile gene regulation in tens of thousands of individual human cells in a single day.
Discovery of performance-enhancing bacteria in the human microbiome
A collaborative team of Harvard researchers pinpointed one specific group of bacteria, called Veillonella, that they found was enriched in the gut microbiome of Boston Marathon runners after after completing the 26.2 race and in an independent group of 87 elite and Olympic athletes after competitions.
Young women who smoke face highest risk of major heart attack
Smoking increases both men's and women's risk of a major heart attack at all ages, but women smokers have a significantly higher increased risk compared to men, especially women under 50 years old, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Music students score better in math, science, English than non-musical peers
High schoolers who take music courses score significantly better on exams in certain other subjects, including math and science, than their non-musical peers, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association.
Immunotherapy and HDAC inhibition are anti-cancer besties
Colorado study shows that adding HDAC inhibitor sensitized cancers to anti-PD1 therapy.
'Bathtub rings' around Titan's lakes might be made of alien crystals
The frigid lakeshores of Saturn's moon Titan might be encrusted with strange, unearthly minerals, according to new research being presented at the 2019 Astrobiology Science Conference, June 24-28, co-hosted by AGU and NASA in Bellevue, Wa.
Food insecurity associated with migraine in young US adults
Food insecurity is when you worry that your food will run out before you have enough money to buy more.
Untangling the complicated relationships between people and nature for a brighter future
With major crises such as extinctions and environmental degradation upon us, there's never been a more crucial time to find solutions to environmental challenges.
Clinical trials beginning for possible preeclampsia treatment
For over 20 years, a team of researchers at Lund University has worked on developing a drug against preeclampsia -- a serious disorder which annually affects around 9 million pregnant women worldwide and is one of the main causes of death in both mothers and unborn babies.
Researchers create multi-junction solar cells from off-the-shelf components
In a proof-of-concept paper, researchers from North Carolina State University detail a new approach for creating multi-junction solar cells using off-the-shelf components, resulting in lower cost, high-efficiency solar cells for use in multiple applications.
Tapping into the way cells communicate
For the first time, scientists can record cells communicating in real time, opening the floodgates for new developments in cell therapy and other areas within cell biology.
A new theory for trapping light particles aims to advance development of quantum computers
Researchers have developed a new protocol for ensuring the stability of data when photons are stored for extended periods of time.
Islamic values play a significant role in the travel decisions of Muslim tourists
Islamic values are just as important as the destination, quality and value for money for Muslims when choosing a holiday destination, according to a new study by the University of Portsmouth.
Popular strategy for raising pregnancy rates in IVF fails to deliver improvement in large trial
The increasingly popular trend for fertility clinics to freeze all IVF embryos for later transfer has been shown in a large multicentre randomised trial to offer no improvement in delivery rates over traditional 'fresh' embryo transfers.
OU study explores 'rainbow wave' and identity gaps in LGBTQ liberal political perspectives
A University of Oklahoma study explores the so-called 'rainbow wave' of LGBTQ voters that emerged during the Trump presidency.
Woodstock really was a free-wheeling festival, new archeological research shows
The Woodstock Music Festival celebrates its 50th anniversary this summer, and new archaeological research from Binghamton University, State University of New York shows that the iconic event took on a life of its own.
PET/CT detects cardiovascular disease risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea patients
Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2019 Annual Meeting draws a strong link between severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and impaired coronary flow reserve, which is an early sign of the heart disease atherosclerosis.
Big city growth escalates the urban-rural divide
Microdata from Swedish population registers provide new insights into cities' economic growth paths.
Screams contain a 'calling card' for the vocalizer's identity
Listeners can correctly identify whether pairs of screams were produced by the same person or two different people -- a critical prerequisite to individual recognition.
Performance-enhancing bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes
New research has identified a type of bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes that contributes to improved capacity for exercise.
What influences how parents and their gay adolescent sons discuss sexual health at home?
Parent-child discussions about sexual health are complicated, particularly with a male teen who identifies as gay, bisexual, or queer.
Big data says food is too sweet
New research from the Monell Center analyzed nearly 400,000 food reviews posted by Amazon customers to gain real-world insight into the food choices that people make.
45% of American adults doubt vaccine safety, according to survey
The survey also asked Americans to choose a statement that best represented their feelings about vaccine safety and efficacy.
Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt
New research led by climate scientists from the University of Bristol suggests that the representation of clouds in climate models is as, or more, important than the amount of greenhouse gas emissions when it comes to projecting future Greenland ice sheet melt.
How to bend waves to arrive at the right place
Under certain circumstances, a wave can split into several paths, reaching some places with high intensity, while avoiding others almost completely.
Alzheimer's disease: Sex affects tau accumulation in the brain
The strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease is the apolipoprotein E type 4 allele (ApoE ε4).
Fingolimod: advantages for some children and adolescents with highly active RRMS
New analyses in an addendum confirm hint of an added benefit in one of four research questions.
Smash and grab: A heavyweight stellar champion for dying stars
PNe theoretically derive from stars in the range 1-8 times the mass of the Sun, representing 90% of all stars more massive than the sun.
Non-invasive, more precise preimplantation genetic test under development for IVF embryos
A team of researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with colleagues at Peking University and Yikon Genomics in China, have evaluated a new way to conduct preimplantation genetic testing and present results showing that this new method may improve the reliability of the test.
Researchers explain visible light from 2D lead halide perovskites
Researchers led by an electrical engineer from the University of Houston have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and diagnostic devices.
Women face more cognitive issues after brain tumor radiation women face more cognitive issues after
Young women who undergo radiation therapy to treat a pediatric brain tumor are more likely to suffer from long-term cognitive impairment than male survivors, according to a study by Georgia State University researchers.
Does stimulation of the brain's dorsal anterior insula trigger ecstasy?
The epileptic 'aura' is a subjective phenomenon that sometimes precedes the visible clinical features of a seizure.
Phones and wearables combine to assess worker performance
Consumer tech and a custom app combine to optimize the employee review.
Broad Institute researchers use novel field-ready CRISPR platform to detect plant genes
SHERLOCK technology is a new CRISPR-based platform that is rapid and portable and enables detection and quantitation of plant genes to support a variety of agricultural applications.
Does limited underground water storage make plants less susceptible to drought?
By tracking water flow through different environments in California, UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a secret to the surprising resilence of Mediterranean plant communities during drought years.
A wearable vibration sensor for accurate voice recognition
Professor Kilwon Cho of Chemical Engineering and Professor Yoonyoung Chung of Electronic and Electric Engineering from POSTECH successfully developed a flexible and wearable vibration responsive sensor.
Helping the body's ability to grow bone
For the first time, scientists have been able to study how well synthetic bone grafts stand up to the rigors and 'strains' of life, and how quickly they help bone re-grow and repair.
Scientists hit pay dirt with new microbial research technique
Long ago, during the European Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci wrote that we humans 'know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot.' Five hundred years and innumerable technological and scientific advances later, his sentiment still holds true.
Why money cannot 'buy' housework
If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account.
Oral steroids put patients with inflammatory disease at high risk of infection
Oral steroid use in patients with the inflammatory diseases polymyalgia rheumatica and/or giant cell arteritis significantly increased the risk of infection, and the risk increased with higher doses, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Mood neurons mature during adolescence
Researchers have discovered a mysterious group of neurons in the amygdala -- a key center for emotional processing in the brain -- that stay in an immature, prenatal developmental state throughout childhood.
Calibration method improves scientific research performed with smartphone cameras
Although smartphones and other consumer cameras are increasingly used for scientific applications, it's difficult to compare and combine data from different devices.
'Good' bacteria may prevent -- and reverse -- food allergy
A study by scientists at Boston Children's Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital, published today in Nature Medicine, makes a strong case that the national epidemic of food allergy is caused by the absence of certain beneficial bacteria in the human gut.
Earlier diagnosis and treatment assessment of tuberculosis achieved with pet/ct
Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2019 Annual Meeting shows that molecular imaging with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can evaluate tuberculosis at the molecular level, effectively identifying diseased areas and guiding treatment for patients.
Study finds micronutrient deficiencies common at time of celiac disease diagnosis
Micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins B12 and D, as well as folate, iron, zinc and copper, are common in adults at the time of diagnosis with celiac disease.
Understanding brain activity when you name what you see
Using complex statistical methods and fast measurement techniques, researchers found how the brain network comes up with the right word and enables us to say it.
More women in US receive 3D mammography but disparities remain
Use of 3D mammography, an advanced form of breast cancer screening, has risen rapidly in recent years, according to Yale researchers in a new study.
Targeting individual atoms
In recent decades, NMR spectroscopy has made it possible to capture the spatial structure of chemical and biochemical molecules.
Galaxy clusters caught in a first kiss
For the first time, astronomers have found two giant clusters of galaxies that are just about to collide.
How Facebook and Google avoided FEC ad disclaimers during 2016 presidential election
The first academic research study to look specifically at how Facebook and Google deadlocked the Federal Election Commission's efforts to regulate digital political advertising.
Shedding light on rhodopsin dynamics in the retina
Photoreceptor cells in our eyes can adjust to both weak and strong light levels, but we still don't know exactly how they do it.
Non-invasive view into the heart
The non-invasive measurement of blood flow to the heart using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is on par with cardiac catheterization.
Ant farmers boost plant nutrition
Research, led by Dr. Guillaume Chomicki from the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, has demonstrated that millions of years of ant agriculture has remodeled plant physiology.
Columbia researchers provide new evidence on the reliability of climate modeling
For decades, scientists studying a key climate phenomenon have been grappling with contradictory data that have threated to undermine confidence in the reliability of climate models overall.
Pathogen engineered to self-destruct underlies cancer vaccine platform
A team of investigators has developed a cancer vaccine technology using live, attenuated pathogens as vectors.
New hypothesis links habitat loss and the global emergence of infectious diseases
Auburn University researchers have published a new hypothesis that could provide the foundation for new scientific studies looking into the association of habitat loss and the global emergence of infectious diseases.
Is US immigration policy environment associated with mental health outcomes for US-born teens of of immigrant parents
The current immigration policy environment in America appears to be associated with reported adverse mental health outcomes among US-born children of Latinx immigrants.
Opioid overdose more likely if family member has opioid prescription
Having a family member who was previously dispensed prescription opioids was associated with higher odds of overdose for individuals who themselves didn't have an opioid prescription in this analysis of insurance company data.
Ruminants' genes are a treasure trove
A new large-scaled research project has mapped the genome of 44 ruminant species -- a group of animals that have intrigued researchers for years because of their biological diversity and their huge importance as domestic animals.
Widely available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of 'superbug' MRSA
Some MRSA infections could be tackled using widely-available antibiotics, suggests new research from an international collaboration led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Sanger Institute.
Interim scan during prostate cancer therapy helps guide treatment
New prostate cancer research shows that adding an interim scan during therapy can help guide a patient's treatment.
Could coffee be the secret to fighting obesity?
Scientists from the University of Nottingham have discovered that drinking a cup of coffee can stimulate 'brown fat', the body's own fat-fighting defenses, which could be the key to tackling obesity and diabetes.
Better care needed for people displaying first symptoms of bipolar disorder
Better care and more research into treatments for people experiencing a first manic episode are urgently needed, according to researchers at the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre.
Crop pests more widespread than previously known
Insects and diseases that damage crops are probably present in many places thought to be free of them, new research shows.
Novel Chinese nanogenerator takes cue from electric eels
Researchers from the Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems and the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a bionic stretchable nanogenerator (BSNG) that takes inspiration from electric eels.
Surrey researchers clear runway for tin based perovskite solar cells
Researchers at the University of Surrey believe their tin based perovskite solar cell could clear the runway for solar panel technology to take off and help the UK reach its 2050 carbon neutral goal.
Scientists discover the forces behind extreme heat over Northeast Asia
To understand what caused the extreme heat over Northeast Asia, a scientific collaboration of climatologists examined the forces of the tropical circulation and sea surface temperature.
Researchers identify genes linked to sex differentiation in giant Amazon fish
Discoveries by Brazilian and German researchers may facilitate early sexing of pirarucu (arapaima) and its reproduction in captivity while also paving the way for genetic improvement.
Research journal publishes first-ever obesity-focused education competencies
Research journal publishes the study 'Development of Obesity Competencies for Medical Education: A Report from the Obesity Medicine Education Collaborative' which outlines the first set of obesity-focused competencies to improve obesity medicine education for physicians and advanced healthcare providers.
Sugary drink taxes reduce consumption, major review shows
A 10 per cent tax on sugary drinks has cut the purchase and consumption of sugary drinks by an average of 10 per cent in places it has been introduced, a just published major review has found.
Applying the Goldilocks principle to DNA structure
Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell.
Monarch butterflies bred in captivity may lose the ability to migrate, study finds
Monarch butterflies purchased from a commercial breeder did not fly in a southward direction, even in offspring raised outdoors, in a new study conducted by scientists at the University of Chicago.
Deportation worries fuel anxiety, poor sleep, among US-born Latinx youth
A new study led by University of California, Berkeley, researchers tracked the mental and physical health of US-born teenage children of Mexican and Central American immigrants in California in the years before and after the 2016 election.
Study shows visual framing by media in debates affects public perception
New research shows that in the 2016 primary debates the front runners from both parties benefitted from preferential visual treatment by the media, but Donald Trump won in terms of camera time and angle.
Stanford researchers teach robots what humans want
Researchers are developing better, faster ways of providing human guidance to autonomous robots.
Commonly prescribed drugs could increase the risk of dementia, says a new study
New research suggests that regular use of certain types of commonly prescribed drugs used to treat bladder conditions, Parkinson's disease and depression, could significantly increase the risk of dementia in later life.
Damage to the ozone layer and climate change forming feedback loop
Increased solar radiation penetrating through the damaged ozone layer is interacting with the changing climate, and the consequences are rippling through the Earth's natural systems, effecting everything from weather to the health and abundance of sea mammals like seals and penguins.
Settling the debate on serotonin's role in sleep
New research finds that serotonin is necessary for sleep, settling a long-standing controversy.
Hate speech on Twitter predicts frequency of real-life hate crimes
According to a first-of-its-kind study, cities with a higher incidence of a certain kind of racist tweets reported more actual hate crimes related to race, ethnicity, and national origin.
A solarium for hens? How to increase the vitamin D content of eggs
Many people suffer from a vitamin D deficiency. This can result in brittle bones and an increased risk of respiratory diseases.
Playing 'tag': Tracking movement of young oysters
A new publication in the journal Estuaries and Coasts investigates the use of a fluorescent dye to track movements of young oysters.
Nuclear medicine PSMA-targeted study offers new options for cancer theranostics worldwide
Research presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) describes a new class of radiopharmaceuticals, named radiohybrids (rh), that offer a fresh perspective on cancer imaging and radioligand therapy (theranostics).

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