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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 26, 2019


Soft robots for all
Each year, soft robots gain new abilities. They can jump, squirm, and grip.
Horticulture CSI
The Long Beach Red radish might still be thought extinct if not for the tenacious efforts of Bachman, Coker and Knight.
Science snapshots: A toxin antidote in frogs, atomic motion in 4D, and better biofuels
In new research from Berkeley Lab and our collaborators, scientists discovered how a protein produced by bullfrogs inhibits the deadly neurotoxin involved in red tide events, glimpsed how atoms move in four dimensions, and identified a bacterial gene that could be engineered into biofuel-producing microbes to greatly boost process efficiency.
Ancient DNA analysis adds chapter to the story of neanderthal migrations
After managing to obtain DNA from two 120,000-year-old European Neandertals, researchers report that these specimens are more genetically similar to Neandertals that lived in Europe 80,000 year later than they are to a Neandertal of similar age found in Siberia.
Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance
A team of researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the University of La Rochelle is now the first to have demonstrated that organic farming benefits honeybee colonies, especially when food is scarce in late spring.
Managing the ups and downs of coffee production
Research could bring new coffee varieties to market faster and improve yields.
UIC, AbbVie scientists develop a novel device to screen advanced crystalline materials
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and AbbVie Inc. have developed a novel device that will help scientists and pharmaceutical companies more effectively screen and test formation of drug substance -- active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).
Binge watching TV increases heart health risks more than a desk job among African Americans
Among African Americans, television watching proved more of a heart health threat than sitting at a desk job.
Bystanders will intervene to help victims of aggressive public disputes
Bystanders will intervene in nine out of 10 public fights to help victims of aggression and violence reveals the largest ever study of real-life conflicts captured by CCTV.
The first AI universe sim is fast and accurate -- and its creators don't know how it works
For the first time, astrophysicists have used artificial intelligence techniques to generate complex 3D simulations of the universe.
Researchers reach milestone in use of nanoparticles to kill cancer with heat
Researchers have developed an improved technique for using magnetic nanoclusters to kill hard-to-reach tumors.
The observation of topologically protected magnetic quasiparticles
A team of researchers from Tohoku University, J-PARC, and Tokyo Institute of Technology conducted an in-depth study of magnetic quasiparticles called 'triplons.' The team conducted the study with a low-dimensional quantum magnet, Ba2CuSi2O6Cl2, using neutron inelastic scattering by AMATERAS at J-PARC.
Given more information about how wine is made, consumers less likely to pay for organic
Consumers are more willing to pay for wine that comes with an organic or organic grape label but providing information about certification standards and organic production practices reduces consumer willingness to pay for all wines.
What made humans 'the fat primate'?
How did humans get to be so much fatter than our closest primate relatives, despite sharing 99% of the same DNA?
New GSA bulletin study of the 2014 Oso landslide
As a compelling example of a large-mobility landslide, the March 22, 2014 landslide near Oso, Washington, USA, was particularly devastating, traveling across a 1-km-plus-wide river valley, killing 43 people, destroying dozens of homes, and temporarily closing a well-traveled highway.
New indicators could help manage global overfishing
The smallest plants and creatures in the ocean power an entire food web, including the fish that much of the world's population depend on for food, work and cultural identity.
Heart risk raised by sitting in front of the TV, not by sitting at work, finds study
Sitting while watching television, but not sitting at work, is associated with a greater risk of heart attack, stroke, or early death, Columbia researchers have found.
Injury more likely due to abuse when child was with male caregiver
The odds of child physical abuse vs. accidental injury increased substantially when the caregiver at the time of injury was male, according to a new study published in The Journal of Pediatrics.
We need to talk about chloramphenicol -- how does this antibiotic cause damage to eukaryotes?
A group of scientists from Japan -- led by Professor Takashi Kamakura of Tokyo University of Science -- has demonstrated, for the first time, the molecular and cellular basis of the 'adverse' effects of the antibiotic chloramphenicol on eukaryotic cells.
Use of evidence-based therapies for youth psychiatric treatment is slow to catch on
Penn Medicine researchers found that over a five-year period in Philadelphia, use of evidence-based therapies -- practices backed by scientific data showing that symptoms improve in response to treatment, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) -- increased only modestly, despite the city and researchers' substantial efforts to showcase the value of these approaches and to provide training to community clinicians.
Researchers reveal lack of evidence for drugs prescribed to treat chronic pain in children
A new study has highlighted an 'unacceptable disparity' in the evidence base for treating chronic pain in children.
Unlocking secrets of the ice worm
WSU researchers have identified an ice worm on Vancouver Island that is closely related to ice worms 1,200 miles away in southern Alaska.
Frontline heroes hailed in the war against devil cancers
Residents of Tasmania's D'Entrecasteaux Channel Peninsula, Kingborough and Huon Valley communities are being hailed as the frontline heroes in the war against two deadly transmissible cancers affecting Tasmanian devils -- Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD) and Devil Facial Tumor 2 (DFT2).
Solving the knotty question of soft-pretzel aroma
Whether at Oktoberfest, the movie theater or a shopping mall, the enticing aroma of soft pretzels is unmistakable.
Read how TV advertisers can measure the impact of their spots with second-screen searching
A new study proposes a framework to evaluate TV ad spots according to their immediate effects on consumers' online search activities.
Computer scientists predict lightning and thunder with the help of artificial intelligence
Together with Germany's National Meteorological Service, the Deutscher Wetterdienst, computer science professor Jens Dittrich and his doctoral student Christian Schön from Saarland University are working on a system that is supposed to predict local thunderstorms more precisely than before.
Kyushu U researchers unlocking keys to longevity of egg cell supply in mammals
Researchers at Kyushu University have shown that reduced oxygen and mechanical compression are two environmental factors playing a role in creating and maintaining a supply of dormant egg cells in mice to ensure a long period of fertility.
Former war refugee maps habitat for West African bird
Former war refugee Benedictus Freeman is lead author of a new paper in the peer-reviewed journal Avian Research that projects the geographic distribution of the bird through 2050.
Environmental destruction linked to African population raises questions about family sizes
Africa is projected to be home to nearly 3 billion people by 2100, but rapid population growth will cause widespread environmental degradation unless effective family planning becomes widespread policy, according to new research that tracked increased population pressures on the continent's ecosystems.
New unprinting method can help recycle paper and curb environmental costs
Imagine if your printer had an 'unprint' button that used pulses of light to remove toner - and thereby quintupled the lifespan of recycled paper.
Significant UK air quality improvements over past 40 years cut death rates
Emission reductions due to policy interventions have reduced air pollutant concentrations and health impacts of UK air pollution since 1970.
Long delays prescribing new antibiotics hinder market for needed drugs
US hospitals wait over a year on average to begin prescribing newly developed antibiotics, a delay that might threaten the supply or discourage future development of needed drugs, according to a University of Wisconsin-Madison study.
A better way to encapsulate islet cells for diabetes treatment
MIT researchers have come up with a novel way to prevent fibrosis, which can lead to rejection of implantable medical devices, by incorporating a crystallized immunosuppressant drug into the devices.
New Australian-Pacific scabies treatment has lasting results, study finds
Results of a two-year update of the world's first comparative trial of mass drug administration against scabies, show that the infection rate is still significantly down.
Uridine diphosphate glucose found to dampen lung cancer metastasis
In a study published online in Nature on June 26, research teams led by Dr.
Neanderthals made repeated use of the ancient settlement of 'Ein Qashish, Israel
The archaeological site of 'Ein Qashish in northern Israel was a place of repeated Neanderthal occupation and use during the Middle Paleolithic, according to a study released June 26, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ravid Ekshtain of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and colleagues.
Honeybees infect wild bumblebees -- through shared flowers
Viruses in managed honeybees are spilling over to wild bumblebee populations though the shared use of flowers, a first-of-its-kind study reveals.
Researchers discover more than 50 lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet
Researchers have discovered 56 previously uncharted subglacial lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet bringing the total known number of lakes to 60.
'Female leadership trust advantage' gives women edge in some crisis situations
Researchers find that trust established by female leaders practicing strong interpersonal skills results in better crisis resolution when outcomes are predictable.
New research shows Parkinson's disease origins in the gut
In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found additional evidence that Parkinson's disease originates among cells in the gut and travels up the body's neurons to the brain.
Study questions success of health intervention currently used in developing countries
In the early 20th century, researchers in Massachusetts studied the first community-based health intervention in the world, the Framingham Health and Tuberculosis Demonstration, deeming it highly successful in controlling tuberculosis (TB) and reducing mortality.
2015 Nepal earthquake offers clues about hazards
A Stanford geophysicist discusses how the devastating 2015 Gorkha earthquake that shook Kathmandu, Nepal gave researchers new information about where, why and how earthquakes occur.
Unexpected mechanism allows CaMKII to decode calcium signaling in the brain
A new study from researchers at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI) has shed light on the unexpected mechanism that allows calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, or CaMKII, to decode and translate calcium signaling in the brain.
Building a bridge to the quantum world
Entanglement is one of the main principles of quantum mechanics.
The Lancet: HPV vaccination programmes have substantial impact in reducing HPV infections and precancerous cervical lesions
The new study is the first to show pooled estimates of population-level impact of HPV vaccination on CIN2+ from several countries, the benefit of vaccinating more than one age group, along with substantial herd effects in countries achieving high vaccination coverage.
Neanderthals used resin 'glue' to craft their stone tools
Archaeologists working in two Italian caves have discovered some of the earliest known examples of ancient humans using an adhesive on their stone tools -- an important technological advance called 'hafting.'
Networks of gene activity control organ development
For the first time, researchers have decoded in two large studies the genetic programs that control the evolution of major organs in humans and other selected mammals before and after birth.
Making music from proteins (video)
Composers string notes of different pitch and duration together to create music.
Reversing t cells' misunderstood rep in responding to a pediatric leukemia
A study of pediatric patients with leukemia demonstrates that they were able to generate T cells against tumor-associated mutations, contradicting previous assumptions that T cells cannot be effectively unleashed on pediatric tumors.
Immunological discovery opens new possibilities for using antibodies
Researchers from the University of Turku have discovered a new route that transports subcutaneously administered antibodies into lymph nodes in just a few seconds.
Study: No outcome differences after hernia surgery by medical doctors vs surgeons in Ghana
New research published June 26, 2019 in JAMA Surgery and co-led by Temple's Jessica H.
Study: Internet perpetuates job market inequality
Recent research finds the internet is giving employers and job seekers access to more information, but has not made the hiring process more meritocratic.
Genetically modified virus combats prostate cancer
In a study with mice, a gene therapy developed in Brazil kills cancer cells and avoids adverse side effects when combined with chemotherapy.
ICSI has no outcome benefits over conventional IVF in routine non-male infertility cases
Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), the world's favored means of fertilization in assisted reproduction, offers no benefit over conventional in vitro fertilization in fertility treatments without a male factor indication, according to results of a large multicenter study.
Boosting amino acid derivative may be a treatment for schizophrenia
Many psychiatric drugs act on the receptors or transporters of certain neurotransmitters in the brain.
Tool dearches EHR data to find child leukemia patients for clinical studies
Researchers who analyzed data in the electronic health records of children seen by hematology/oncology specialists at three large medical centers have developed an algorithm to accurately identify appropriate pediatric oncology patients for future clinical studies.
Snails show that variety is the key to success if you want to remember more
Neuroscientists at the University of Sussex have revealed the factors that impact on memory interference, showing that a change is as good as a rest when it comes to retaining more information.
Older adults' independence is most significant factor for vulnerability in hot weather
Efforts to support older people during extreme heat should focus on those who lack independence or have pre-existing health issues, according to an expert from the University of Warwick.
The two faces of the Jekyll gene
Genes which are specific to a species or group of species can reflect important genetic changes within lineages.
Mechanism of tumor metastasis and tumor-suppressive role of UDP-glucose revealed
Scientists from Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) and Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology (SIBCB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed that UDP-glucose accelerates SNAI1 mRNA decay and impairs lung cancer metastasis.
A hidden truth: Hospital faucets are often home to slime and biofilm
Hand hygiene is a critical component of infection prevention in hospitals, but the unintended consequences include water splashing out of a sink to spread contaminants from dirty faucets according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).
Experimental physicists redefine ultrafast, coherent magnetism
For the first time ever, experimental physicists have been able to influence the magnetic moment of materials in sync with their electronic properties.
Blood supply therapy bid boosted by fresh insights into key cells
Therapies to improve recovery after a heart attack could be developed following fresh insights into how key cells are formed.
ALMA pinpoints the formation site of planet around nearest young star
Researchers using ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) found a small dust concentration in the disk around TW Hydrae, the nearest young star.
Sustainability-linked loans provide opportunities for chemical firms
Spurred by calculations showing that companies with a lower environmental impact are less of a financial risk, banks are beginning to offer cheaper loans if chemical firms hit agreed-upon levels of environmental performance.
The RoboBee flies solo
The RoboBee -- the insect-inspired microrobot developed by researchers at Harvard University -- has become the lightest vehicle ever to achieve sustained flight without the assistance of a power cord.
Immune damage may explain ineffectiveness of high-dose radiation against lung cancer
study finds 14.3 month vs. 28.2 month median survival for high- vs. low-dose radiation in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer.
Fruit bats can transform echoes into images
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that fruit bats actually integrate vision and echolocation to flourish in the dead of night.
New mouse model of Parkinson's disease shows how it spreads from the gut
Parkinson's disease can begin in the gut and spread to the brain via the vagus nerve, researchers report June 26 in the journal Neuron.
Learning from experience is all in the timing
Animals learn the hard way which sights, sounds, and smells are relevant to survival.
Paternal age over 51 years reduces success rate in IVF and ICSI
While female fertility comes to an irrevocable end with the menopause (at a consistently average age of 51 years), men are not constrained by similar biological senescence.
Can Facebook improve your mental health?
Contrary to popular belief, using social media and the internet regularly could improve mental health among adults and help fend off serious psychological distress, such as depression and anxiety, finds a new Michigan State University study.
The ancient history of Neandertals in Europe
Parts of the genomes of two ~120,000-year-old Neandertals from Germany and Belgium have been sequenced at the MPI for Evolutionary Anthropology.
New study on gene editing in wildlife finds people are wary
The applications of CRISPR based genetic engineering tools range from changing colors in butterfly wings to developing gene therapies that might one day cure or prevent human diseases.
How to help patients recover after a stroke
The existing approach to brain stimulation for rehabilitation after a stroke does not take into account the diversity of lesions and the individual characteristics of patients' brains.
Study: Social robots can benefit hospitalized children
A new study demonstrates, for the first time, that 'social robots' used in support sessions held in pediatric units at hospitals can lead to more positive emotions in sick children.
Bleach-induced transformation for humidity-durable air filters
A molecule-trapping material that normally degrades in water remains stable after two years of humidity exposure when treated with a common skin bleach.
Widespread disease diabetes: Why do beta cells refuse to release insulin?
One in 11 adults worldwide suffers from diabetes, and the number of diabetes patients is rising rapidly.
New female external catheter technology reduces CAUTI by 50%
Hospital-wide introduction of new female external catheter technology halved the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).
Lessons from Columbine: New technology provides insight during active shooter situations
A Purdue University researcher and students created a computer model, based on the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School, which looks at what happens to victims caught in shooter situations to provide better training for schools and other organizations.
Researchers find that probiotic bacteria reduces the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats
Researchers from Virginia Tech and UC Santa Cruz did a field trial on the effect of probiotic bacteria on white-nose syndrome in bat populations.
From simple tools to high-level buy-in, how doctors can help cancer patients quit tobacco
A simple set of decision-support tools combined with institutional buy-in can help increase the number of cancer patients who engage in treatment to help them quit tobacco, data from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania show.
Shell increases versatility of nanowires
Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers.
Is a great iron fertilization experiment already underway?
Using a new, highly sensitive tracer for human-derived iron falling on the ocean, researchers led by the USF College of Marine Science say we have underestimated the iron we add to the ocean compared to natural sources.
First snapshots of trapped CO2 molecules shed new light on carbon capture
Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have taken the first images of carbon dioxide molecules within a molecular cage -- part of a highly porous nanoparticle known as a MOF, or metal-organic framework, with great potential for separating and storing gases and liquids.
Food insecurity leading to type 2 diabetes
A collaborative study by a team of Connecticut researchers shows there is a strong connection between food insecurity and insulin resistance, the underlying problem in type 2 diabetes.
Diving into water treatment strategies for swimming pools
With summer in full swing, many people are cooling off in swimming pools.
Cascade exacerbates storage diseases
In rare, hereditary storage diseases such as Sandhoff's disease or Tay-Sachs syndrome, the metabolic waste from accumulating gangliosides cannot be properly disposed of in the nerve cells because important enzymes are missing.
Being a 'morning person' linked to lower risk of breast cancer
Being a morning person (popularly known as larks) is associated with a lower risk of developing breast cancer than being an evening person (popularly known as owls), finds a study published by The BMJ today.
Practice makes perfect
Argonne researchers are beginning to employ Bayesian methods in developing optimal models of thermodynamic properties.
Does likelihood of survival differ between patients with single vs. multiple primary melanomas?
Patients with multiple primary melanomas had a higher likelihood of dying than those with a single primary melanoma in a study that used data from registries in the Netherlands.
Professors need to be entertaining to prevent students from watching YouTube in class
Students think it is instructors' responsibility to ensure they don't surf the web in class, according to a new study.
Migraine increases the risk of complications during pregnancy and childbirth
Pregnant women with migraine have an increased risk of miscarriage, caesarean sections and giving birth to a child with low birth weight.
Scientists developing way to help premature babies breathe easier
Researchers suggest a possible cell-based therapy to stimulate lung development in fragile premature infants who suffer from a rare condition called Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD), which in the most severe cases can lead to lifelong breathing problems and even death.
Interdisciplinary approach decreases broad spectrum antibiotic usage
An interdisciplinary approach to antimicrobial stewardship involving comprehensive blood culture identification (BCID) testing decreased broad spectrum antibiotic use, according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).
New forest treatment helps trees adapt better to climatic change
Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR), the Andalusian Institute of Agricultural Research and Training, Fishing, Food and Organic Production (IFAPA), and the Pyrenean Institute of Ecology of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) confirm that pine trees subjected to water stress manage their resources better when they have less competition in their immediate environment.
Understanding how tics are suppressed may help some at risk for tic disorders
Studying children shortly after they began experiencing tics, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Climate warming could increase malaria risk in cooler regions
Malaria parasites develop faster in mosquitoes at lower temperatures than previously thought, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Exeter.
Natural ingredients in supplements, nutraceuticals get a new type of barcode
Increasingly, shoppers are choosing nutraceuticals, cosmetics and herbal remedies with natural ingredients, and these products are readily available in many drug stores and supermarkets.
The fundamental physics of frequency combs sheds light on nature's problem-solving skills
Nature has a way of finding optimal solutions to complex problems.
Translating proteins into music, and back
In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages.
Is multiple sclerosis linked to childhood viral infections?
The exact causes of multiple sclerosis still remain unknown. In a mouse model of the disease, researchers (UNIGE) studied the potential link between transient cerebral viral infections in childhood and the development of this cerebral autoimmune disease later in life.
Confining cell-killing treatments to tumors
Researchers at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT have developed a technique to prevent cytokines escaping once they have been injected into the tumor, by adding a Velcro-like protein that attaches itself to the tissue.
New knowledge on the development of asthma
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied which genes are expressed in overactive immune cells in mice with asthma-like inflammation of the airways.
Corals can survive in acidified ocean conditions, but have lower density skeletons
Coral reefs face many challenges to their survival, including the global acidification of seawater as a result of rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.
Understanding what makes captive gorilla hearts tick
We've known for some time that heart disease is prevalent in captive gorilla populations and is a leading cause of death.
Study reveals key factor in Himalayan earthquake rupture
A study led by Prof. BAI Ling from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (ITP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed that the rupture length of the 2015 MW 7.8 Gorkha earthquake was likely controlled by spatial (both along- and across-strike) variations in the Main Himalayan Thrust.
Factors orthopaedic surgeons should consider when prescribing opioids
Orthopaedic surgeons are the third-highest physician prescribers of opioids, writing more than 6 million prescriptions a year.
Managed apiaries may lead to higher rates of viral infection in wild bumblebees
Viral pathogens that might play a role in the decline in wild bumblebees may be transmitted from managed honeybees through flowers, according to a study published June 26 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Samantha Alger of the University of Vermont, and colleagues.
Age itself appears to increase the spread of Alzheimer's-associated tau in the brain
A study by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital finds evidence that spread through the brain of the Alzheimer's-disease-associated protein tau is facilitated by factors within the aging brain itself and not by how long the protein has been expressed by neurons.
Robot arm tastes with engineered bacteria
A robotic gripping arm that uses engineered bacteria to 'taste' for a specific chemical has been developed by engineers at UC Davis and Carnegie Mellon University.
Reining in the ecological effects of free-roaming horses
Free-roaming horses are an icon of the American West that has often captured the public's imagination.
Undercounting of agroforestry skews climate change mitigation planning and reporting
Scientists expose the lack of measurement of and reporting on agroforestry in international climate agreements.
ALS patients may benefit from more glucose
A new study led by scientists at the UA has uncovered a potential new way to treat patients with ALS, a debilitating neurodegenerative disease.
Keeping active or becoming more active in middle and older age linked to longer life
Keeping physically active or becoming more active during middle and older age is associated with a lower risk of death, regardless of past activity levels or existing health conditions, suggests a large UK study published by The BMJ today.
Restricted permit-only access to Yosemite National Park's Half Dome summit, anticipated to improve hiker safety, did not
According to a new study in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, implementation in 2010 of permit-only access to Yosemite National Park's Half Dome cable handrails along the final ascent of this iconic landmark reduced the number of people on the summit at one time, but this did not result in a significant reduction in the overall toll of associated human suffering and mortality, or search and rescue (SAR) activity and costs.
Newly defined cancer driver is fast, furious and loud
A new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center finds that the gene FOXA1 overrides normal biology in three different ways to drive prostate cancer.
To increase bike commuters, look to neighborhoods
People agree that bike commuting improves health, reduces air pollution and eases traffic, a recent survey suggests.
Towards a worldwide inventory of all plants
Declining biodiversity due to man-made habitat destruction and climate change means that information about plant diversity and its distribution across the planet is now crucial for biodiversity conservation.
Disrupted sleep in one's 50s, 60s raises risk of Alzheimer's disease
PET brain scans of healthy older adults show that those reporting lower sleep quality through their 50s and 60s have higher levels of tau protein, a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.
Protein scissors for cellular transport
The movement of material in and out a cell, endocytosis, depends on proteins that cut the membrane to form vesicles encapsulating the transported materials.
The water future of Earth's 'third pole'
One-seventh of the world's population depends on rivers flowing from Asia's high mountain ranges for water to drink and to irrigate crops.
Ocean acidification boosts algal growth but impairs ecological relationships
Shrimp fed on marine algae grown in acidic water do not undergo a sex change that is a characteristic part of their reproductive life-cycle, report Mirko Mutalipassi and colleagues at Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn in Italy in a study publishing June 26 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.
A new normal: Study explains universal pattern in fossil record
Instead of the typical bell-shaped curve, the fossil record shows a fat-tailed distribution, with extreme, outlier, events occurring with higher-than-expected probability.
Long-term statin use associated with lower glaucoma risk
A new study brings the connection between statin use and risk of glaucoma into sharper focus.
The case of the poisoned songbirds
Researchers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Wildlife Investigations Laboratory present their results from a toxicological investigation into a mortality event involving songbirds in a new publication in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.
Vaccination programs substantially reduce HPV infections and precancerous cervical lesions
Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination programs have substantially reduced the number of infections and precancerous cervical lesions caused by the virus, according to a study published today in The Lancet by researchers from Université Laval and the CHU de Québec-Université Laval Research Centre.
New, noninvasive test for bowel diseases
Gut diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly prevalent worldwide, especially in industrialized countries.
Childhood leukemia cannot hide from the immune system
Despite having few mutations, the immune system has no problem recognizing childhood leukemia.
3D printed prosthetic hand can guess how you play rock, paper, scissors
A new 3D-printed prosthetic hand can learn the wearers' movement patterns to help amputee patients perform daily tasks, reports a study published this week in Science Robotics.

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