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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 28, 2019


Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered
Scientists at Newcastle University have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction.
One in 10 people have 'near-death' experiences, according to new study
The new findings were presented at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress.
Teens who can describe negative emotions can stave off depression
Teenagers who can describe their negative emotions in precise and nuanced ways are better protected against depression than their peers who can't.
Toxic substances found in the glass and decoration of alcoholic beverage bottles
New research by the University of Plymouth shows that bottles of beer, wine and spirits contain potentially harmful levels of toxic elements, such as lead and cadmium, in their enamelled decorations.
University researchers find WhatsApp can be good for our health
Academics at Edge Hill University have found that spending time on social media, specifically WhatsApp, is good for our wellbeing.
My health: consumers empowered by sharing medical 'selfies'
Taking medical 'selfies' and sharing them with a doctor empowers and reassures healthcare consumers, and can improve doctor-patient relationships, a two-part study led by Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia has found.
Reducing the psychological distress of patients diagnosed with a common, retinal disease
A new study from City, University of London suggests that effective communication from eye health professionals may help reduce patient fears after they are diagnosed with the 'dry' form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
Global agriculture: Impending threats to biodiversity
A new study compares the effects of expansion vs. intensification of cropland use on global agricultural markets and biodiversity, and finds that the expansion strategy poses a particularly serious threat to biodiversity in the tropics.
Tumour treating fields in glioblastoma: Indication of a benefit
The additional application of the new treatment method prolongs survival, as a recent study shows.
What can trigger violence in postcolonial Africa?
Why do civil wars and coups d'├ętat occur more frequently in some sub-Saharan African countries than others.
Study examines changes in health equity in US over 25 years
A survey study based on 25 years of data from more than 5.4 million people in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System suggests more work is needed on health equity in the United States.
There's need to intensify diabetes screening amongst older patients living with HIV
This study examines the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients in Buffalo City Municipality, East London, South Africa.
Researchers decipher the history of supermassive black holes in the early universe
Astrophysicists at Western University have found evidence for the direct formation of black holes that do not need to emerge from a star remnant.
Medically unnecessary ambulance rides soar after ACA expansion
CU Denver researcher discovered that medically unnecessary ambulance rides have drastically increased due to the expansion of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
When the dinosaurs died, lichens thrived
When the asteroid hit, dinosaurs weren't the only ones that suffered.
Embracing bioinformatics in gene banks
Scientists from the IPK have explored, within a perspective paper, the upcoming challenges and possibilities of the future of gene banks.
Moments of clarity in dementia patients at end of life: Glimmers of hope?
It happens unexpectedly: a person long thought lost to the ravages of dementia, unable to recall the events of their lives or even recognize those closest to them, will suddenly wake up and exhibit surprisingly normal behavior, only to pass away shortly thereafter.
Gene activity database could spare thousands of mice
A comprehensive database of gene activity in mice across ten disease models, which could significantly reduce animal use worldwide, has been developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, which gives a full picture of the immune response to different pathogens.
Scientists find thirdhand smoke affects cells in humans
Thirdhand smoke can damage epithelial cells in the respiratory system by stressing cells and causing them to fight for survival, a research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found.
Take two E. coli and call me in the morning
What if the bacteria in your daily probiotic were also able to detect diseases in the gut and indicate when something is awry?
Skoltech scientists found a way to control the electrical characteristics of optical memory devices
A group of researchers from Skoltech, the Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS, and N.D.
Ending needless chemotherapy for breast cancer
A diagnostic test developed at The University of Queensland might soon determine if a breast cancer patient requires chemotherapy or would receive no benefit from this gruelling treatment.
The state of multiple antibiotic resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Cape Coast, Ghana
The study was conducted to investigate the level of contamination of raw meat and Ghanaian coins in circulation at Cape Coast Metropolis.
Researchers look to unlock post-traumatic stress disorder puzzle
A team of Penn State and University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine researchers is attempting to answer a question that has long puzzled experts: Why do some individuals suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing trauma, and others do not?
Pig-Pen effect: Mixing skin oil and ozone can produce a personal pollution cloud
When ozone and skin oils meet, the resulting reaction may help remove ozone from an indoor environment, but it can also produce a personal cloud of pollutants that affects indoor air quality, according to a team of researchers.
An improved vaccine for bacterial meningitis and bloodstream infections
Researchers have now developed a new vaccine, a native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine, for meningitis and bloodstream infections caused by 'meningococcal group B' bacteria.
Confirmation of old theory leads to new breakthrough in superconductor science
Scientists at Harvard have developed a superconductor that is only one nanometer thick.
New material shows high potential for quantum computing
A joint team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is getting closer to confirming the existence of an exotic quantum particle called Majorana fermion, crucial for fault-tolerant quantum computing -- the kind of quantum computing that addresses errors during its operation.
Amphibians infected by ranavirus found in Atlantic rain forest
Ranavirus is linked to amphibian decline or extinction in other parts of the world, but in Brazil, it has been reported only in captive animals.
Short sleep duration and sleep variability blunt weight loss
High sleep variability and short sleep duration are associated with difficulties in losing weight and body fat.
Low-income, less educated women least likely to access infertility care
Despite similar rates of infertility among all socioeconomic groups, white women, women with higher education levels, and women with higher incomes are at least twice as likely to seek treatment as other groups of women, new research suggests.
How to improve corporate social and environmental responsibility
New research led by the University of California, Riverside shows NGOs are more likely to sway companies into ethical behavior with carefully targeted reports that consider a range of factors affecting the companies and industries.
Opioids study shows high-risk counties across the country, suggests local solutions
Dozens of counties in the Midwest and South are at the highest risk for opioid deaths in the United States, say University of Michigan researchers.
Epidemiological review on emerging & re-emerging parasitic infectious diseases in Malaysia
Re-emerging infectious diseases are those that were once a health problem in a particular region or a country and are now emerging again.
Protein linked to aggressive skin cancer
Almost 300,000 people worldwide develop malignant melanoma each year. The disease is the most serious form of skin cancer and the number of cases reported annually is increasing, making skin cancer one of Sweden's most common forms of cancer.
Birth, child outcomes associated with moms using opioids during pregnancy
In utero exposure to opioids was associated with higher risks for short- and long-term adverse outcomes including preterm birth and neurodevelopmental and physical health disorders in children.
New method divides patients with ulcerative colitis in groups
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a way of using gene expression conserved across species to divide patients with the inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis into two distinct groups.
Low-cost retinal scanner could help prevent blindness worldwide
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a low-cost, portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanner that promises to bring the vision-saving technology to underserved regions throughout the United States and abroad.
Artificial DNA can control release of active ingredients from drugs
A drug with three active ingredients that are released in sequence at specific times: Thanks to the work of a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), what was once a pharmacologist's dream is now much closer to reality.
Controlling deadly malaria without chemicals
Scientists have finally found malaria's Achilles' heel, a neurotoxin that isn't harmful to any living thing except Anopheles mosquitoes that spread malaria.
Students chowing down tuna in dining halls are unaware of mercury exposure risks
Some students are helping themselves to servings of tuna well beyond the amounts recommended to avoid consuming too much mercury.
Botox cousin can reduce malaria in an environmentally friendly way
Researchers at the universities in Stockholm and Lund, in collaboration with researchers from the University of California, have found a new toxin that selectively targets mosquitos.
Study connects low social engagement to amyloid levels and cognitive decline
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found that higher brain amyloid-╬▓ in combination with lower social engagement in elderly men and women was associated with greater cognitive decline over three years.
In the drive to decrease low-value care, many don't assess the right impacts on patients
Health care institutions and providers face mounting pressure to wring more value out of every dollar spent on caring for their patients.
X-ray imaging provides clues to fracture in solid-state batteries
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to visualize in real time how cracks form near the edges of the interfaces between materials in solid-state batteries.
Researchers teleport information within a diamond
Researchers from the Yokohama National University have teleported quantum information securely within the confines of a diamond.
Study: Society pays heavy price for failure to diagnose and treat conduct disorder
A new study published in Nature Reviews reviewed evidence from research conducted around the world and estimated the prevalence of conduct disorder to be around 3 percent in school-aged children and a leading cause of referral to child and adolescent mental health services.
New Geosphere study examines 2017-2018 Thomas Fire debris flows
Shortly before the beginning of the 2017-2018 winter rainy season, one of the largest fires in California (USA) history (Thomas fire) substantially increased the susceptibility of steep slopes in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties to debris flows.
Smart materials provide real-time insight into wearers' emotions
Researchers from Lancaster University's School of Computing and Communications have worked with smart materials on wrist-worn prototypes that can aid people diagnosed with depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorders in monitoring their emotions.
Nonnative pear trees are showing up in US forests
Callery or Bradford pear trees are starting to show up in many eastern forests.
Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg.
Medicines made of solid gold to help the immune system
By testing a variety of gold nanoparticles, researchers (UNIGE and Swansea) are providing first evidence of their impact upon human B lymphocytes -- the immune cells responsible for antibody production.
Smart glasses follow our eyes, focus automatically
By using eye-tracking technology to automatically control a pair of autofocus lenses, engineers have created a prototype for 'autofocals' designed to restore proper vision in people who would ordinarily need progressive lenses.
Utrafast magnetism: Electron-phonon interactions examined at BESSY II
How fast can a magnet switch its orientation and what are the microscopic mechanisms at play ?

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
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#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...