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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | July 01, 2019


Coupled proteins
Researchers from Heidelberg University and Sendai University in Japan used new biotechnological methods to study how human cells react to and further process external signals.
Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise: NUS study
Marine scientists from the National University of Singapore found that coral species in Singapore's sedimented and turbid waters are unlikely to be impacted by accelerating sea-level rise
What is association of radioactive iodine treatment for overactive thyroid with risk of cancer death?
Radioactive iodine has been used since the 1940s to treat hyperthyroidism, an overactive thyroid.
Hubble captures the galaxy's biggest ongoing stellar fireworks show
Imagine slow-motion fireworks that started exploding 170 years ago and are still continuing.
Researchers discover genetic mutation behind serious skull disorder
An international collaboration has identified a new genetic mutation behind the premature fusing of the bony plates that make up the skull.
Wood products mitigate less than 1% of global carbon emissions
The world's wood products -- all the paper, lumber, furniture and more -- offset just 1% of annual global carbon emissions by locking away carbon in woody forms, according to new University of Wisconsin-Madison research.
How you and your friends can play a video game together using only your minds
UW researchers created a method for two people help a third person solve a task using only their minds.
Gender bias alive and well in health care roles, study shows
Results of a multi-center study of patients' assumptions about health care professionals' roles based on gender show significant stereotypical bias towards males as physicians and females as nurses.
NLST follow up reaffirms that low dose CT reduces lung cancer mortality
The authors of the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial report on an extended analysis of the patient cohort that was followed up on after the 2011 study was published.
A cold-tolerant electrolyte for lithium-metal batteries emerges in San Diego
Improvements to a class of battery electrolyte first introduced in 2017 -- liquefied gas electrolytes - could pave the way to a high-impact and long-sought advance for rechargeable batteries: replacing the graphite anode with a lithium-metal anode.
Glowing brain cells illuminate stroke recovery research
A promising strategy for helping stroke patients recover, transplanting neural progenitor cells to restore lost functions, asks a lot of those cells.
Mutation discovery leads to precise treatment for child with severe lymphatic disorder
Faced with a preteen boy who had painful swelling and respiratory distress from a severe, deteriorating rare condition, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia identified the responsible gene mutation and harnessed that knowledge to develop a novel treatment that dramatically improved the problem.
NCI study finds increased risk of cancer death following treatment for hyperthyroidism
Findings from a study of patients who received radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment for hyperthyroidism show an association between the dose of treatment and long-term risk of death from solid cancers, including breast cancer.
Low vitamin D at birth raises risk of higher blood pressure in kids
Vitamin D deficiency from birth to early childhood was associated with an increased risk of elevated systolic blood pressure during childhood and adolescence.
Cancer cell's 'self eating' tactic may be its weakness
Researchers reveal how pancreatic cancer cells adapt to the low energy environment of a tumor: by eating their own mitochondria!
After WIC offered better food options, maternal and infant health improved
A major 2009 revision to a federal nutrition program for low-income pregnant women and children improved recipients' health on several key measures, researchers at UC San Francisco have found.
Study finds electronic cigarettes damage brain stem cells
A research team at the University of California, Riverside, has found that electronic cigarettes, often targeted to youth and pregnant women, produce a stress response in neural stem cells, which are critical cells in the brain.
Inexpensive equipment and training can improve melanoma detection and reduce biopsies
Researchers say non-dermatologist physicians can make earlier and more accurate diagnoses of melanomas using a dermatoscope.
High doses of 60 plus-year-old chemo drug found to spur immune system attack on lymphoma
Cyclophosphamide, a mainstay of chemotherapy for many cancers, acts as both chemotherapy and immunotherapy at high doses, study finds.
Alcohol causes significant harm to those other than the drinker
Each year, one in five US adults -- an estimated 53 million people -- experience harm because of someone else's drinking, according to new research in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
'Oumuamua is not an alien spacecraft
Early reports of the interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua's odd characteristics led some to speculate that the object could be an alien spacecraft, sent from a distant civilization to examine our star system.
The chemical language of plants depends on context
Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, studied the ecological function of linalool in Nicotiana attenuata tobacco plants.
Stanford study shows how to improve production at wind farms
On a working wind farm, Stanford researchers have shown that angling turbines slightly away from the wind can boost energy produced overall and even out the otherwise variable supply.
Female bedbugs 'control' their immune systems ahead of mating to prevent against STIs
Female bedbugs who are 'full bellied' and therefore more attractive mates for males, are able to boost their immune systems in anticipation of catching sexually transmitted infections, research has found.
New imaging molecule captures brain changes tied to progressive multiple sclerosis
'There's more to multiple sclerosis than white matter lesions,' said corresponding author Tarun Singhal, M.D., a neurologist at the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at the Brigham.
Brain network evaluates robot likeability
Researchers have identified a network of brain regions that work together to determine if a robot is a worthy social partner, according to a new study published in JNeurosci.
BioSA -- Bridging the gap with biodegradable metals
The University of Malta has teamed up with Mater Dei Hospital to address the shortcomings of current bone scaffolds on the market in a project entitled Biodegradable Iron for Orthopaedic Scaffold Applications -- BioSA.
In Health Affairs: Large positive returns on HIV treatment
In 2014 the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) established 90-90-90 treatment targets for the treatment of HIV.
Sleep readies synapses for learning
Synapses in the hippocampus are larger and stronger after sleep deprivation, according to new research in mice published in JNeurosci.
Good medicine depends on diversity
Nearly 80 percent who have contributed DNA for research are of European ancestry.
WVU researcher studies how nursing homes can accommodate obese residents
West Virginia University researcher Nicholas Castle is part of a team investigating how nursing homes can best meet obese residents' healthcare needs.
Protein clumps in ALS neurons provide potential target for new therapies
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified chemical compounds that prevent stress-induced clumping of TDP-43 protein in ALS motor neurons grown in the lab -- a starting point for new ALS therapeutics.
Study shows some generics can cost medicare recipients more than brand-name drugs
Medicare Part D enrollees may pay more out of pocket for high-priced specialty generic drugs than their brand-name counterparts, according to new research by health policy experts at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Scientists alarmed by bark beetle boom
Bark beetles are currently responsible for killing an unprecedented number of trees in forests across Europe and North America.
Location-based data can provide insights for business decisions
Data from social commerce websites can provide essential information to business owners before they make decisions that could determine whether a new venture succeeds or fails.
Yellow fever virus responsible for current epidemic in Brazil originated in Amazon in 1980
Researchers have retraced the pathogen's route as it spread from the state of Pará by analyzing tissue samples from dead monkeys.
Two-degree climate goal attainable without early infrastructure retirement
If power plants, boilers, furnaces, vehicles, and other energy infrastructure is not marked for early retirement, the world will fail to meet the 1.5-degree Celsius climate-stabilizing goal set out by the Paris Agreement, but could still reach the 2-degree Celsius goal, says the latest from the ongoing collaboration between the University of California Irvine's Steven Davis and Carnegie's Ken Caldeira.
Benzodiazepine use with opioids intensifies neonatal abstinence syndrome
Babies born after being exposed to both opioids and benzodiazepines before birth are more likely to have severe drug withdrawal, requiring medications like morphine for treatment, compared to infants exposed to opioids alone, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Hospital Pediatrics.
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2019
ORNL story tips: Study of waste soft drinks for carbon capture could help cut carbon dioxide emissions; sharing secret messages among three parties using quantum communications just got more practical for better cybersecurity; designed synthetic polymers can serve as high-performance binding material for next-generation li-ion batteries; high-fidelity modeling for predicting radiation interactions outside reactor core could keep nuclear reactors running longer; scientists looking to neural networks to create computers that mimic human brain.
Building up an appetite for a new kind of grub
Researchers have reviewed current insect farming methods, processing technologies and commercialisation techniques, as well as current perceptions towards edible insects.
Spiraling filaments feed young galaxies
The Keck Cosmic Web Imager's improved sensitivity and resolution are giving astronomers a better look at galaxy mechanics.
'Back to school asthma' linked to tripling in rate of health service appointments
'Back to school asthma' -- a seasonal peak in cases associated with the start of the school year in September -- is linked to a tripling in the rate of family doctor (GP) appointments across England, reveals research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
CCNY experts in lateralization of speech publish discovery
City College of New York-led researchers have published a breakthrough in understanding previously unknown inner workings related to the lateralization of speech processing in the brain.
UCI, UC Merced: California forest die-off caused by depletion of deep-soil water
The inability of long-rooted trees to reach their subsurface water supply in the Sierra Nevada mountain range led to widespread forest die-offs following the drought of 2012-2015.
Stem cell stimulation improves stroke recovery
Stem cell stimulation shows promise as a potential noninvasive stroke treatment, according to research in mice published in JNeurosci.
Deal or no deal? How discounts for unhappy subscribers can backfire on businesses
New research from the University of Notre Dame demonstrates discounts may not be successful in retaining customers in the long term.
Many grandparents' medicines not secure enough around grandchildren, poll suggests
Whether it's a rare treat or a weekly routine, many older adults enjoy spending time with grandchildren.
Transformer cells: Shaping cellular 'behaviour'
Scientists from the Sechenov University, conjointly with their fellow Chinese and American researchers, have examined the latest advances in the use of skeletal muscle progenitor cells, specifying the core challenges inherent to the applicability of MPCs in cell therapy, and outlining the most promising breakthrough technologies.
NASA finds winds tore Tropical Storm 04W apart
Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed Tropical Cyclone 04W had been torn apart from wind shear in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
Fairtrade benefits rural workers in Africa, but not the poorest of the poor
A new study from the University of Göttingen and international partners has analysed the effects of Fairtrade certification on poor rural workers in Africa.
Current pledges to phase out coal power are critically insufficient to slow climate change
The Powering Past Coal Alliance, or PPCA, is a coalition of 30 countries and 22 cities and states, that aims to phase out unabated coal power.
Geisel study finds downside risk contracts still less common for ACOs
Dartmouth-led study shows that while the number and variety of contracts held by Accountable Care Organizations have increased dramatically in recent years, the proportion of those bearing downside risk has seen only modest growth.
Research questions link between unconscious bias and behavior
Implicit bias, a term for automatically activated mental associations, is often seen as a primary cause of discrimination against social groups such as women and racial minorities.
Pharmaconutrition — Modern drug design for functional studies
Antonella Di Pizio and Maik Behrens of the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, together with their cooperation partners, have developed highly effective activators for the bitter receptor TAS2R14 in a German-Israeli research project.
New measurements shed light on the impact of water temperatures on glacier calving
Calving, or the breaking off of icebergs from glaciers, has increased at many glaciers along the west coast of Svalbard.
Chemists give chance a helping hand
The chemical industry depends on efficient, long-term methods of producing synthetically derived molecules.
Noninvasive test improves detection of aggressive prostate cancer
A team of researchers from UCLA and the University of Toronto have identified a new biomarker found in urine that can help detect aggressive prostate cancer, potentially saving hundreds of thousands of men each year from undergoing unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy treatments.
New study solves mystery of salt buildup on bottom of Dead Sea
New research explains why salt crystals are piling up on the deepest parts of the Dead Sea's floor, a finding that could help scientists understand how large salt deposits formed in Earth's geologic past.
Catheters: Big source of infection, but often overlooked
Indwelling devices like catheters cause roughly 25% of hospital infections, but ongoing efforts to reduce catheter use and misuse haven't succeeded as much as health care workers would like.
Hubble captures cosmic fireworks in ultraviolet
Hubble offers a special view of the double star system Eta Carinae's expanding gases glowing in red, white, and blue.
Danish researchers create worldwide solar energy model
For any future sustainable energy system, it is crucial to know the performance of photovoltaic (solar cell) systems at local, regional and global levels.
Analysis finds US ecosystems shifting hundreds of miles north
Researchers with the Center for Resilience in Working Agricultural Landscapes used 50 years of data on bird distributions and concluded that ecosystems have shifted northward by hundreds of miles.
Researchers identify new way to make cancer self-destruct
Researchers have identified a method that can make tumors grow too quickly and die from the stress.
Newly-discovered 1,600-year-old mosaic sheds light on ancient Judaism
For nine years running, UNC-Chapel Hill professor Jodi Magness has led a team of research specialists and students to the ancient village of Huqoq in Israel's Lower Galilee, where they bring to light the remains of a Late Roman synagogue.
3D holograms bringing astronomy to life
Scientists unravelling the mysteries of star cluster formation have taken inspiration from a 19th century magic trick, to help explain their work to the public.
A bacteria likely to reduce the cardiovascular risks of 1 in 2 people
University of Louvain conducted the first pilot study in humans to observe the impact of the bacteria Akkermansia.
Scissors get stuck -- another way bacteria use CRISPR/Cas9
Before humans repurposed it as a gene editing tool, CRISPR/Cas9 was a sort of internal immune system bacteria use to defend themselves against phages.
Alcohol and pregnancy policies: Birth outcomes & prenatal care use by race
This research examines whether effects of alcohol/pregnancy policies vary by race.
New initiative improved care for sepsis patients, but black patients saw smaller benefits
The New York Sepsis Initiative was launched in 2014 with the goal of improving the prompt identification and treatment of sepsis.
'Gentle recovery' of Brazil's leatherback turtles
Brazil's leatherback turtles are making a 'gentle recovery' after 30 years of conservation efforts, new research shows.
Harnessing reliability for neuroscience research
Neuroscientists are amassing the large-scale datasets needed to study individual differences and identify biomarkers.
CPAP provides relief from depression
Researchers have found that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can improve depression symptoms in patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases.
New model suggests lost continents for early Earth
A new radioactivity model of Earth's ancient rocks calls into question current models for the formation of Earth's continental crust, suggesting continents may have risen out of the sea much earlier than previously thought but were destroyed, leaving little trace.
PBS restrictions result in outdated and unsafe care
Prescribing restrictions for anti-epileptic drugs expose flaws in the review process of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), a University of Queensland researcher proposes.
Some children are more likely to suffer depression long after being bullied
Some young adults who were bullied as a child could have a greater risk of ongoing depression due to a mix of genetic and environmental factors.
Rutgers researchers identify the origins of metabolism
A Rutgers-led study sheds light on one of the most enduring mysteries of science: How did metabolism -- the process by which life powers itself by converting energy from food into movement and growth -- begin?
Women missing class and missing out due to period pain
Period pain significantly impacts young women's academic performance worldwide, according to new Australian-led research -- and women are 'putting up with it' rather than seeking treatment.
Combing nanowire noodles
Brain-machine interfaces could one day help monitor and treat symptoms of neurological disorders, provide a blueprint to design artificial intelligence, or even enable brain-to-brain communication.
Study highlights need for integrated healthcare for the homeless
A University of Birmingham study has found alarming evidence of severe mental health problems, substance dependence and alcohol misuse amongst homeless population.
'Planting green' cover-crop strategy may help farmers deal with wet springs
Allowing cover crops to grow two weeks longer in the spring and planting corn and soybean crops into them before termination is a strategy that may help no-till farmers deal with wet springs, according to Penn State researchers.
Physicists use light waves to accelerate supercurrents, enable ultrafast quantum computing
Iowa State's Jigang Wang and a team of collaborators have discovered that terahertz light -- light at trillions of cycles per second -- can act as a control knob to accelerate supercurrents.
An effort to stop the revolving door for hospital patients may be spinning its wheels
A new study shows that after several years of rapid improvements in hospital readmissions, the federal readmission penalty program may be spinning its wheels more than it's slowing the spinning of the revolving hospital door.
Sense of smell, pollution and neurological disease connection explored
A consensus is building that air pollution can cause neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but how fine, sooty particles cause problems in the brain is still an unanswered question.
Scientists identify interactions that stabilize a neurodegeneration-associated protein
A team of researchers led by Nicolas Fawzi, an associate professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Biotechnology at Brown University, used a combination of techniques to determine the atomic interactions that stabilize the liquid, yet 'condensed' phase of FUS, which is found in a a 'solid' or aggregate phase in some people with severe cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and a type of dementia called frontotemporal dementia.
Theoretical physicists unveil one of the most ubiquitous and elusive concepts in chemistry
Even if we study them at school, oxidation numbers have so far eluded any rigorous quantum mechanical definition.
Docs should consider a patient's weight before prescribing new chemotherapy drugs
Docs should consider a patient's weight before prescribing new chemotherapy drugs.
Recycling plastic: Vinyl polymer broken down to aspirin components
Not a day goes by without news of microplastics in our oceans.
Scientists track the source of the 'Uncanny Valley' in the brain
Scientists have identified mechanisms in the human brain that could help explain the phenomenon of the 'Uncanny Valley' -- the unsettling feeling we get from robots and virtual agents that are too human-like.
Copper compound shows further potential as therapy for slowing ALS
A compound with potential as a treatment for ALS has gained further promise in a new study that showed it improved the condition of mice whose motor neurons had been damaged by an environmental toxin known to cause features of ALS.
New BU program prepares trainees for teaching modern, integrated medical curriculum
'Integrating the Educators,' a pilot internship program at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is successful in training biomedical science trainees (graduate students/Ph.D. and postdocs) in the skills of being a medical educator.
Heart attack patients with diabetes may benefit from cholesterol-lowering injections
Regular injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes and who have had a recent heart attack.
'Committed' CO2 emissions jeopardize international climate goals, UCI-led study finds
To meet internationally agreed-upon climate targets, the world's industrial nations will need to retire fossil fuel-burning energy infrastructure ahead of schedule, according to a new study in Nature from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions.
New data resource reveals highly variable staffing at nursing homes
Researchers who analyzed payroll-based staffing data for US nursing homes discovered large daily staffing fluctuations, low weekend staffing and daily staffing levels that often fall well below the expectations of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), all of which can increase the risk of adverse events for residents.
How to protect corals facing climate change
The best way to protect corals threatened by climate change is to conserve a wide range of their habitats, according to a study in Nature Climate Change.
New metalloenzyme-based system allows selective targeting of cancer cells
RIKEN researchers have developed a promising method to deliver a drug to cancer cells without affecting surrounding tissues, involving a clever combination of an 'artificial metalloenzyme' that protects a metal catalyst, and a sugar chain that guides the metalloenzyme to the desired cells.
NASA looks at Tropical Storm Barbara's heavy rainfall
Tropical Storm Barbara formed on Sunday, June 30 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean over 800 miles from the coast of western Mexico.
Standard TB tests may not detect infection in certain exposed individuals
In a study, infectious disease experts identified a large group of people who were clearly exposed to TB for more than 10 years but the two most reliable tests (TST and IGRA) came back negative on repeated tests.
Response to gene-targeted drugs depends on cancer type
Cancers with the same genetic weaknesses respond differently to targeted drugs depending on the tumour type of the patient, new research reveals.
Environmentally friendly control of common disease infecting fish and amphibians
Aquatic organisms in marine systems and freshwaters are threatened by fungal and fungal-like diseases globally.
World's smallest MRI performed on single atoms
IBS-QNS researchers have made a major scientific breakthrough by performing the world's smallest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
More people born with a single lower heart chamber survive; but, face challenges in quality and length of life
The Fontan procedure has saved the lives of many people born with only one ventricle, but their unique circulatory system requires lifelong medical monitoring and care.
NETRF-funded research may help predict pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) recurrence
NETRF-funded researchers identified a cancer cell type that is associated with non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) recurrence.
Evolution of life in the ocean changed 170 million years ago
New research led by the University of Plymouth identifies a previously overlooked global event which changed the course of the evolution of life in the oceans.
Peer support reduces carer burden
In a world first, La Trobe University research has shown how peer-led support programs for family and friends who provide regular support to an adult diagnosed with a mental health condition can significantly improve carer well-being.
Simulating quantum systems with neural networks
A new computational method, based on neural networks, can simulate open quantum systems with unprecedented versatility.
An innovative method for detecting defaulting participants based on sparse reconstruction
In the contract-based demand response, some of the participants may default in providing the scheduled negawatt energy owing to demand-side fluctuations faults.
Blood pressure self-monitoring helps get patients with hypertension moving, study says
Using blood pressure self-monitoring is an effective way to empower patients with hypertension to stick with an exercise program, according to a first-of-its-kind study conducted by a multidisciplinary team of UConn researchers in collaboration with Hartford Hospital.
Citizen scientists discover cyclical pattern of complexity in solar storms
Citizen scientists have discovered that solar storms become more complex as the sun's 11-year activity cycle reaches its maximum -- a finding which could help forecasters predict which space weather events could have potentially devastating consequences for modern technologies at Earth.
Three-dimensional model illuminates key aspects of early development
Researchers have created a new 3D model of human embryonic tissue that promises to shed light on critical components of development -- including processes that go awry during pregnancy complications.
Radio telescope ALMA finds earliest example of merging galaxies
Researchers using ALMA observed signals of oxygen, carbon, and dust from a galaxy in the early Universe 13 billion years ago.
UK MPs more likely to have mental health issues than general public, survey shows
UK politicians (MPs) at Westminster are more likely to have mental health issues than either the general public or other people in comparable professions/managerial posts, suggest the responses to a survey of parliamentarians, published in the online journal BMJ Open.
Well-meaning climate measures can make matters worse
Lifestyle changes can reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and help protect nature.
Shorter courses of proton therapy can be just as effective as full courses prostate cancer
Treating prostate cancer with higher doses of proton therapy over a shorter amount of time leads to similar outcomes when compared to standard dose levels and treatments and is safe for patients.
Researchers clock DNA's recovery time after chemotherapy
A team of researchers led by Nobel laureate Aziz Sancar found that DNA damaged by the widely used chemotherapy drug cisplatin is mostly good as new in noncancerous tissue within two circadian cycles, or two days.
When kinetics and thermodynamics should play together
Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering suggests that without considering certain factors, researchers may overestimate how fast calcium carbonate forms in saline environments.
Could marijuana be an effective pain alternative to prescription medications?
A new study has shown how cannabis could be an effective treatment option for both pain relief and insomnia, for those looking to avoid prescription and over the counter pain and sleep medications -- including opioids.
Scientists discover processes to lower methane emissions from animals
University of Otago scientists are part of an international research collaboration which has made an important discovery in the quest to lower global agricultural methane emissions.
Breaking the barriers to health care for transgender individuals
The latest comprehensive review addresses current practice recommendations and encourages providers to stay informed.
Using facts to promote cancer prevention on social media is more effective than anecdotes
Clear information from trusted organizations has greater reach on social media than personal accounts.
International team of comet and asteroid experts agrees on natural origin for Oumuamua
14 asteroid and comet experts, including two from the University of Hawaii, determine that Oumuamua, the first recorded interstellar visitor, has natural origins, despite previous speculation by some other astronomers that the object could be an alien spacecraft sent from a distant civilization to examine our star system.

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.