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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | July 04, 2019


Strain of common cold virus could revolutionize treatment of bladder cancer
A strain of the common cold virus has been found to potentially target, infect and destroy cancer cells in patients with bladder cancer, a new study in the medical journal Clinical Cancer Research reports.
The global tree restoration potential
Restoration of the Earth's forests is the world's most effective solution to climate change available today and has the potential to capture two thirds of man-made carbon emissions, finds landmark research by the Crowther Lab, published today in the journal Science.
Scientists discover the biggest seaweed bloom in the world
The record-breaking belt of brown algae stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico -- and it's likely here to stay, says a team led by the USF College of Marine Science
More money, skills and knowledge needed for social prescribing to serve as route into work
A new report from The Work Foundation, Embedding Work and Related Outcomes into Social Prescribing: Overcoming Challenges and Maximising Opportunities, says social prescribing can be an effective means of integrating people into work.
Camera brings unseen world to light
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a highly compact, portable camera that can image polarization in a single shot.
Sports playbook helps doctors predict cancer patient outcomes, say Stanford researchers
Using in-game win probability techniques, Stanford researchers devised a way to predict a cancer patient's outcome at any point during treatment.
How trees could save the climate
Around 0.9 billion hectares of land worldwide would be suitable for reforestation, which could ultimately capture two thirds of human-made carbon emissions.
Area for restoring trees far greater than imagined and 'best climate change solution available'
In the first study to quantify how many trees the Earth can support, where, and how much carbon they could store, researchers report that Earth could support enough additional trees to cut carbon levels in the atmosphere by nearly 25% -- levels not seen for almost a century.
Satellite data reveals largest-ever macroalgae bloom
Scientists have used satellite observations to identify the largest bloom of macroalgae in the world, the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt -- a heavy mass of brown algae stretching from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico.
Scientists invent fast method for 'directed evolution' of molecules
Scientists demonstrated the technique by evolving several proteins to perform precise new tasks, each time doing it in a matter of days.
Tiny change has big effects, reverses prediabetes in mice
A small chemical change -- shifting the position of two hydrogen atoms -- makes the difference between mice that are healthy or that have insulin resistance and fatty liver, major risk factors for diabetes and heart disease.
The Lancet: Nerve transfer surgery restores hand function and elbow extension in 13 young adults with complete paralysis
Nerve transfer surgery has enabled 13 young adults with complete paralysis to regain movement and function in their elbows and hands, according to the largest case series of this technique in people with tetraplegia (paralysis of both the upper and lower limbs), published in The Lancet.
Molecular oxygen sensing systems conserved across kingdoms
Researchers have discovered a biochemical oxygen sensing system conserved across biological kingdoms, which allows both plant and animal cells to sense and respond appropriately to changes in oxygen levels -- an ability central to the survival of most forms of life.
Call for green burial corridors alongside roads, railways and country footpaths
A leading public health expert is calling for a strategic initiative to develop green burial corridors alongside major transport routes because British graveyards and cemeteries are rapidly running out of room.
Hundreds of sharks and rays tangled in plastic
Hundreds of sharks and rays have become tangled in plastic waste in the world's oceans, new research shows.
'Eyes' for the autopilot
Automatic landings have long been standard procedure for commercial aircraft.
Discovery of mechanism behind precision cancer drug opens door for more targeted treatment
New research that uncovers the mechanism behind the newest generation of cancer drugs is opening the door for better targeted therapy.
Altered gene expression may trigger collapse of symbiotic relationship
Researchers in Japan have identified the potential genes responsible for coral bleaching caused by temperature elevation.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...