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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | July 08, 2019


Nutritional supplements and diets not always protective, WVU research suggests
Do the nutritional supplements people take or the diets they adhere to actually protect them against cardiovascular problems and death?
Prediction tool from Kaiser Permanente researchers may identify patients at risk for HIV
Researchers have developed a new analytical tool that identifies people at risk of contracting HIV so they may be referred for preventive medication.
Live fast and die young, or play the long game? Scientists map 121 animal life cycles
Scientists have pinpointed the 'pace' and 'shape' of life as the two key elements in animal life cycles that affect how different species get by in the world.
Wind, warmth boost insect migration, first-ever University of Guelph study reveals
Researchers equipped monarch butterflies and green darner dragonflies with radio transmitters and tracked them through southern Ontario and several northern States to learn how environmental factors affect daytime insect migration.
Scientists' warning to humanity: Microbiology and climate change
When it comes to climate change, ignoring the role of microorganisms could have dire consequences, according to a new statement issued by an international team of microbiologists.
'Liquid forensics' could lead to safer drinking water
Ping! The popular 1990 film, The Hunt for Red October, helped introduce sonar technology on submarines to pop culture.
Key early steps for origin of life occur under a variety of conditions
Potential precursors to life on Earth form from a variety of complex mixtures, according to a team of scientists who say this could point to the development of building blocks crucial to forming genetic molecules for the origins of life on Earth.
Natural antioxidant helps improve immune-based therapies by modulating T-cells
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina discovered a way to improve immune-based treatments by modulating T-cells.
A common gut virus that maps our travels
This benign virus changes as we travel, is found in two-thirds of the world's population, and has deep implications for future drug delivery and personalized medicine.
New model forecasts anomalous growth patterns for substitutive products and behaviors
Data analysis shows that products that are considered to be substitutive in nature have a very different growth trajectory from traditional product models.
Microvascular disease anywhere in the body may be linked to higher risk of leg amputations
Microvascular disease, a disorder of very small blood vessels, may increase the risk of leg amputation independent of other blood vessel conditions and regardless of the location of the microvascular issue, such as eyes (retinopathy), kidneys (nephropathy) or feet (neuropathy).
WHO mental health guidelines could better capture 'lived experience'
Mental health patients want mental health diagnostic descriptions to better reflect what it feels like to live with their conditions in the World Health Organization's global manual of diagnoses -- according to a new Lancet Psychiatry report.
The UC3M programs a humanoid robot to communicate in sign language
Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have published a paper featuring the results of research into interactions between robots and deaf people, in which they were able to programme a humanoid - called TEO - to communicate in sign language.
Do passengers prefer autonomous vehicles driven like machines or like humans?
Passenger and pedestrian confidence are key to future development of autonomous vehicles so researchers at WMG at the University of Warwick have conducted and reported an experiment to see which driving style engendered the highest levels of confidence among autonomous vehicles passengers - driving with full machine efficiency, or driving in a way that emulates average human driving.
The declining impact of federal funding on cancer innovation
New research featured in Nature Biotechnology studies the impact of the funding by the National Institutes of Health in the field of cancer research.
Exploiting green tides thanks to a marine bacterium
Ulvan is the principal component of Ulva or 'sea lettuce' which causes algal blooms (green tides).
Left out to dry: A more efficient way to harvest algae biomass
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba develop a new system for evaporating the water from algae biomass with reusable nanoporous graphene, which can lead to cheaper, more environmentally friendly biofuels and fine chemicals.
Hormone therapy for prostate cancer may raise risk of Alzheimer's, Dementia
A Penn study of more than 150,000 men with prostate cancer shows androgen deprivation therapy was associated with a higher likelihood of developing dementia when compared to patients who were not exposed to the treatment.
NASA satellites find biggest seaweed bloom in the world
An unprecedented belt of brown algae stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico--and it's likely here to stay.
New review highlights evidence on how to increase physical activity in everyday life
Physical activity is important for physical and mental wellbeing and keeping socially connected.
Scientists develop new method for studying early life in ancient rocks
Scientists have developed a new method for detecting traces of primordial life in ancient rock formations using potassium.
High rates of opioid prescriptions for osteoarthritis
Opioids work against severe pain but the risks of side effects and addiction are high.
Bacteria associated with hospital infections are found in raw meat
Bacteria of the Acinetobacter ACB complex, which are frequently acquired in hospital settings, can also be found in beef meat, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' and performed with meat samples from markets in Lima, Peru.
Snow algae thrive in high-elevation ice spires, an unlikely oasis for life
High in the Andes Mountains, dagger-shaped ice spires house thriving microbial communities, offering an oasis for life in one of Earth's harshest environments as well as a possible analogue for life on other planets.
Cartoons are appropriate for developing children's narrative skills and values
A study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Evolutionary Psychology and Education has explored the validity of narrative and non-narrative cartoons for developing narrative skills, moral reasoning and values and countervalues in children in mainstream and non-mainstream education.
Researchers: Eggshells can help grow, heal bones
Eggshells can enhance the growth of new, strong bones needed in medical procedures, a team of UMass Lowell researchers has discovered.
BU finds police shooting racial disparities reflect segregation
Racial residential segregation is the predominant factor that explains why some cities have greater racial disparities in fatal police shootings than others, according to a new study by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers published in the Journal of the National Medical Association.
Screen size matters: Consumers less attentive to news content on small screens
If you're getting your news from a smartphone, size matters.
Is that news really 'fake,' or is it just biased?
In an era of concern over 'fake news,' a new study finds that people draw a distinction between information sources that are dishonest and those that are biased.
UK researchers develop ultrafast semiconductors
UK researchers have developed world-leading Compound Semiconductor (CS) technology that can drive future high-speed data communications.
UBC scientists find high mutation rates within huge, old-growth trees
UBC scientists found the first evidence of the tremendous genetic variation that can accumulate in some of our tallest trees.
Autistic adults experience high rates of negative life events
Autistic adults are vulnerable to many types of negative life experience, including employment difficulties, financial hardship, domestic abuse and 'mate-crime', according to new research published today in the journal Autism Research.
Teens abusing painkillers are more likely to later use heroin
A USC study in the July 8, 2019 issue of JAMA Pediatrics shows that teens who use prescription opioids to get high are more likely to start using heroin by high school graduation.
Is caregiver depression associated with more emergency department visits by patients with dementia?
An observational study of 663 caregivers and the patients with dementia they care for suggests caregiver depression is associated with increased emergency department visits for their patients.
Ridehailing services may be driving up traffic deaths
The arrival of ridehailing is associated with an increase of approximately 3 percent in the number of motor vehicle fatalities and fatal accidents, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.
How the brain remembers where you're heading to
The brain appears to implement a GPS system for spatial navigation; however, it is not yet fully understood how it works.
Study: Some stereotypes seem to be universally applied to biracial groups in the US
A new Northwestern University study has found evidence that there are some stereotypes that seem to be universally applied to biracial groups in the U.S.
UBC scientists capture images of gene-editing enzymes in action
For the first time, scientists have captured high-resolution, three-dimensional images of an enzyme in the process of precisely cutting DNA strands.
Indian Ocean causes drought and heatwaves in South America
Researchers have revealed that atmospheric waves originating from convection over the Indian Ocean had a dramatic impact on climate conditions over South America and South Atlantic, leading to drought and marine heatwaves.
Structure of brain networks is not fixed, study finds
The shape and connectivity of brain networks -- discrete areas of the brain that work together to perform complex cognitive tasks -- can change in fundamental and recurring ways over time, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
Study confirms disparities in triple-negative breast cancer diagnoses
A new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, shows that women of color and young women may face elevated risks of developing triple-negative breast cancers, which are often aggressive and do not respond to hormone therapy or targeted therapy.
Evolutionary coupling analysis identifies the impact of disease-associated variants
Predicting the impact of DNA sequence variants is important for sorting disease-associated variants (DVs) from neutral variants.
Looking at how the brain reacts to boredom could help people cope
New WSU research shows people can be taught coping mechanisms to avoid negative responses to boring situations.
Blood test may predict risk of recurrence for breast cancer patients
A special blood test may one day predict if a newly diagnosed breast cancer patient will likely relapse years later.
Novel method identifies patients at risk for HIV who may benefit from PrEP strategies
Researchers have demonstrated the effectiveness of using algorithms that analyze electronic health records to help physicians identify patients at risk for HIV who may benefit from preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which significantly reduces the risk of getting HIV.
CNIO researchers discover that the rate of telomere shortening predicts species lifespan
Comparison of telomeres of goats, dolphins, gulls, reindeer, vultures, flamingos, elephants, mice and humans reveals that species whose telomeres shorten faster have shorter lives.
A new rare metals alloy can change shape in the magnetic field
Scientists developed multifunctional metal alloys that emit and absorb heat at the same time and change their size and volume under the influence of a magnetic field.
Study finds psychiatric diagnosis to be 'scientifically meaningless'
A new study, published in Psychiatry Research, has concluded that psychiatric diagnoses are scientifically worthless as tools to identify discrete mental health disorders.
Uncovering possible role of polyphosphate in dialysis-related amyloidosis
Researchers from Osaka University found that the low concentrations of the naturally occurring biopolymer, polyphosphate (polyP), induces amyloid formation from β2 microglobulin under both acidic and neutral conditions but by different mechanisms.
Istanbul: Seafloor study proves earthquake risk for the first time
Istanbul is located in close proximity to the North Anatolian fault, a boundary between two major tectonic plates where devastating earthquakes occur frequently.
Killing the seeds of cancer: A new finding shows potential in destroying cancer stem cells
When doctors remove a tumor surgically or use targeted therapies, the cancer may appear to be gone.
Dual-polarization radars for forecasting heavy rainfall in China: Research and development
In recent years, with the advent of dual-pol radar technologies in China, dozens of dual-pol radars have been developed by universities, research institutes, and weather observatories.
UTA researchers identify genetic pathway that could enhance survival of coral
Three researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have made a groundbreaking discovery that could enhance the ability of reef-building corals to survive a rapidly warming and disease-filled ocean.
New probe could help surgeons more accurately remove tumours
A study led by researchers at RCSI's Department of Chemistry has the potential to help surgeons more accurately remove tumours and detect cancer in lymph nodes during surgery.
Combining antibiotics, researchers deliver one-two punch against ubiquitous bacterium
By combining two well-established antibiotics for the first time, a scientific team led by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center has delivered a 'double whammy' against the pervasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a potentially deadly form of bacteria that is a major source of hospital-based infections.
Breaching a 'carbon threshold' could lead to mass extinction
Carbon dioxide emissions may trigger a reflex in the carbon cycle, with devastating consequences, study finds.
Fish die-offs linked to hotter summers
Fish die-offs in Wisconsin lakes are expected to double by mid-century and quadruple by 2100 due to warmer summer temperatures, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Climate Change.
Highway medians are a source of food for wildlife, study shows
Vegetated highway medians are a proverbial buffet for small mammals, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.
Human waste an asset to economy, environment, study finds
Human waste might be an unpleasant public health burden, but scientists at the University of Illinois see sanitation as a valuable facet of global ecosystems and an overlooked source of nutrients, organic material and water.
Scientists find urine test could offer a non-invasive approach for diagnosis of IBS
Scientists at McMaster University have identified new biomarkers for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in urine, which could lead to better treatments and reduce the need for costly and invasive colonoscopy procedures currently used for diagnosis.
On the way to nanotheranostics
Nanotheranostics is a cutting-edge field of medicine that uses nanoparticles to simultaneously diagnose and treat diseases.
Two new algorithms can identify patients at risk of HIV
Two new studies developed algorithms that can identify patients who are at risk of acquiring HIV and may benefit from preventive care.
Sedentary time increases after retirement -- especially in women
The FIREA study, conducted at the University of Turku (Finland), revealed that the amount of sitting time increased in women after the transition to retirement.
GW pilot study finds collagen to be effective in wound closure
Researchers in the George Washington University Department of Dermatology found that collagen powder is just as effective in managing skin biopsy wounds as primary closure with non-absorbable sutures.
Global survey shows crAssphage gut virus in the world's sewage
A global survey shows that a family of gut bacteria viruses called crAssphage is found in people -- and their sewage -- all over the world.
Tuning the energy levels of organic semiconductors
Physicists from the Dresden Integrated Center for Applied Physics and Photonic Materials (IAPP) and the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) at the TU Dresden, together with researchers from Tübingen, Potsdam and Mainz were able to demonstrate how electronic energies in organic semiconductor films can be tuned by electrostatic forces.
Jurassic shift: Changing the rules of evolution
Is the success of species mainly dependent on environmental factors such as climate changes or do interactions between the species have a greater role to play?
First proof-of-concept demonstrates genetic sex selection in mammals
A new Tel Aviv University study reveals a genetic system in mammals that enables two animals to mate and produce only females.
Surprising NYC ridesharing study findings have implications for policymakers
Researchers have limited access to information about how people use popular ridesharing services like Uber and Lyft.
Uranium toxicity may be causing high rates of obesity and diabetes in Kuwait
Kuwait has some of the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the world, and scientists don't know why.
Becoming new parents increases produce purchases
In the United States, both children and adults eat too few fruits and vegetables, which puts them at risk for poor diet quality and adverse health consequences.
One-molecule-thick coating to help improve disease and drug testing
A new breakthrough has the potential to improve sensors used to test for diseases and detect doping in sports.
Want to boost creativity? Try playing Minecraft
Video games that foster creative freedom can increase creativity under certain conditions, according to new research from Iowa State University.
Transformed tobacco fields could cuts costs for medical proteins
A new Cornell University-led study describes the first successful rearing of engineered tobacco plants in order to produce medical and industrial proteins outdoors in the field, a necessity for economic viability, so they can be grown at large scales.
Quitting alcohol may improve mental well-being, health-related quality of life
Quitting alcohol may improve health-related quality of life for women, especially their mental well-being, according to a study from Hong Kong published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
A tale of two proteins: The best and worst of metabolic adaptation
The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis states that the nutritional environment in early life makes people susceptible to lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and heart attack, as adults.
Castor oil-based inhibitors to remove gas hydrate plugs in Arctic deposits
The castor-based waterborne polyurea/urethanes (CWPUUs) were synthesized on the basis of the waterborne technique.
Cannabis dosage studied to reduce seizures in children with severe epilepsy
Medicinal cannabis oil containing both cannabidiol (CBD) and a small amount of THC ended or reduced the number of seizures in children with severe, drug-resistant epilepsy.
Heat transport can be blocked more effectively with a more optimized holey nanostructure
The research group of Nanoscience Center at University of Jyvaskyla confirms its earlier observations that by using the wave nature of heat in holey nanostructures heat conduction can be reduced by over hundredfold.
Fighting drug resistance with fast, artificial enhancement of natural products
Japanese researchers have identified multiple promising new drug candidates to treat antibiotic-resistant infections, including superbugs.
Genomic 'map' reveals not all fat is equal
Garvan and CSIRO researchers have uncovered key differences underlying harmful and non-harmful fat.
Optimizing the growth of coatings on nanowire catalysts
A chemical surface treatment boosts the catalytic activity of the wire-looking nanostructures for a key reaction in solar fuel production.
NASA catches Post Tropical Cyclone Cosme fading
Tropical Storm Cosme formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean over the weekend of July 6 and 7 and after two days, the storm already weakened to a remnant low pressure area.
Cave droplets provide window into past climates
The chemistry of drip waters that form stalagmites and stalactites in caves around the world have given researchers an insight into our past climate.
New anticancer agents may better control tumor growth in nearly every cancer type
Researchers at Purdue University have discovered a novel set of MYC promoter G-quadruplex stabilizers that have demonstrated anticancer activity in human cancer cell cultures.
Development of 3D particle model for single particles in battery electrodes
DGIST Professor Yong Min Lee's team in the Department of Energy Science and Engineering succeeded in developing an electrochemical model that can predict and analyze the electrochemical phenomena of the single particles of electrode active materials.
Moffitt researchers identify effective drug combination against uveal melanoma
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have identified a new drug combination that is effective against metastatic uveal melanoma cells in preclinical studies.
Indications why older people are more susceptible to Alzheimer's disease
The risk of developing Alzheimer's disease increases with age. Susanne Wegmann of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) in Berlin and US colleagues have uncovered a possible cause for this connection: Certain molecules involved in the disease, termed tau-proteins, spread more easily in the aging brain.
Ancient Saharan seaway shows how Earth's climate and creatures can undergo extreme change
A new paper integrates 20 years of research by a diverse scientific team and describes the ancient Trans-Saharan Seaway of Africa that existed 50 to 100 million years ago in the region of the current Sahara Desert.
Massive stars grow same way as light stars, just bigger
Astronomers obtained the first detailed face-on view of a gaseous disk feeding the growth of a massive baby star.
How is marijuana legalization associated with teen use?
This research letter reports on the association between the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana and teen marijuana use.
Journal of Dental Research Centennial July 2019: Fluoride Revolution and Dental Caries
While the global epidemic of dental caries that began about 140 years ago was very largely caused by the rise in sugar consumption, the more recent decline in caries during the last 50 years has been due largely to the use of fluoride.
Window film could even out the indoor temperature using solar energy
A window film with a specially designed molecule could be capable of taking the edge off the worst midday heat and instead distributing it evenly from morning to evening.
Cancer cells will become vulnerable
Researchers from HSE University (The Higher School of Economics) have used machine learning to discover that the two most widespread DNA structures -- stem-loops and quadruplexes -- cause genome mutations that lead to cancer.
Knowing BRCA status associated with better breast cancer outcomes even without surgery
Study: Women who knew their BRCA+ status were diagnosed with earlier stage breast cancer, needed less chemotherapy, less extensive surgery, and had greater overall 5-year survival (98 percent vs.
'Curvy bacteria' weigh the benefits of different shapes
Research by scientists into why some bacteria have different shapes has found that a curved shape can make it easier to find food.
The parallel ecomorph evolution of scorpionflies: The evidence is in the DNA
Defying expectations, scorpionflies were found to have ecomorphed in parallel evolutions, independently adapting along different high altitude locations in Japan.
IOF review of impact of drug holidays on bone health
The impact of interruption of anti-osteoporosis treatment in patients on therapy with bisphosphonates or denosumab is reviewed in a new IOF Working Group paper.
Playfully discover atom manipulation
The team of Toma Susi at the University of Vienna uses an electron microscope to manipulate strongly bound materials with atomic precision.
Too much screen time for the kids? Grandparents may also be complicit
A new study by Rutgers and other researchers finds that today's grandparents are still true to their traditional fun-loving image -- allowing their grandchildren, while under their supervision, to spend about half of their time on a mobile phone, tablet, computer or TV.
Scientists create new 'y-shaped' synthetic consortium for efficient bio-manufacturing
A group of Chinese scientists have recently developed a new synthetic consortium for efficient pentose-hexose co-utilization that could improve bio-manufacturing.
X-rays reveal monolayer phase in organic semiconductor
An international team of researchers has investigated how the electrical properties of dihexyl-quarterthiophene thin films depend on their structure.
New imaging method aids in water decontamination
A breakthrough imaging technique developed by Cornell University researchers shows promise in decontaminating water by yielding surprising and important information about catalyst particles that can't be obtained any other way.
Producing graphene from carbon dioxide
The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global-warming effect.
New method may resolve difficulty in measuring universe's expansion
Radio telescope observations have made it possible for astronomers to use mergers of neutron-star pairs as a valuable new tool for measuring the Universe's expansion.
Using an embryonic pause to save the date
A date palm seedling can pause its development to boost its resilience before emerging into the harsh desert environment.
Infection-fighting protein also senses protein misfolding in non-infected cells
Researchers at the University of Toronto have uncovered an immune mechanism by which host cells combat bacterial infection, and at the same time found that a protein crucial to that process can sense and respond to misfolded proteins in all mammalian cells.
Most powerful and mildest reagents obtained based on eco-friendly iodine
An international team of chemists from Tomsk Polytechnic University, USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, and France has synthesized environmentally friendly reagents for the pharmaceutical industry.
New technique allows real-time microscopy at high heat and loading
Researchers have demonstrated a technique that allows them to track microscopic changes in metals or other materials in real time even when the materials are exposed to extreme heat and loads for an extended period of time -- a phenomenon known as 'creep.' The technique will expedite efforts to develop and characterize materials for use in extreme environments, such as nuclear reactors.
No escape for mosquitoes
Venus flytraps are capable of detecting the movements of even the smallest insects.
Portland State study shows ways to reduce extreme heat in city neighborhoods
Planting more vegetation, using reflective materials on hard surfaces and installing green roofs on buildings can help cool potentially deadly urban heat islands -- a phenomenon that exists in nearly all large cities -- a new study from Portland State University shows.
Ignoring cues for alcohol and fast food is hard -- but is it out of our control?
A UNSW psychology experiment has shown why it can be so hard to direct our attention away from cues that might lead to behavior we'd like to avoid, like drinking alcohol and eating unhealthy food.
Researchers can finally modify plant mitochondrial DNA
Researchers in Japan have edited plant mitochondrial DNA for the first time, which could lead to a more secure food supply.
Why is east Asian summer monsoon circulation enhanced under global warming?
A collaborated study shows that the Tibetan Plateau plays an essential role in enhancing the East Asian summer monsoon circulation under global warming through enhanced latent heating over the Tibetan Plateau.
Climate change and deforestation together push tropical species towards extinction
Only 38 per cent of tropical forest is 'wildlife friendly' as a result of deforestation, increasing the likelihood that vulnerable species will go extinct, say scientists.
UCI team pioneers cancer treatment that targets bone metastases while sparing bone
University of California, Irvine researchers have developed and tested on mice a therapeutic treatment that uses engineered stem cells to target and kill cancer bone metastases while preserving the bone.
First hi-res images of active CRISPR enzyme will help improve genome editing
For the first time, scientists grappling with how to improve the efficiency of CRISPR technology -- a gene-editing platform that uses an enzyme called Cas9 to precisely cut and edit specific sequences of DNA within a live cell -- have captured atomic-level, three-dimensional images of the enzyme before and after cutting the DNA.
Problematic smartphone use linked to poorer grades, alcohol misuse, more sexual partners
A survey of more than 3,400 university students in the US has found that one in five respondents reported problematic smartphone use.
Researchers show that the composition of human skin microbiome can be modulated
Scientists at UPF and the company S-Biomedic have demonstrated the use of living bacteria to modulate skin microbiome composition.
Ancient molar points to interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia
An analysis of a 160,000-year-old archaic human molar fossil discovered in China offers the first morphological evidence of interbreeding between archaic humans and Homo sapiens in Asia.
Tracing the roots: Mapping a vegetable family tree for better food
In the new study, a team of multi-institution scientists led by the University of Missouri challenged prior theories of the origins of three vegetables -- canola, rutabaga and Siberian kale -- by mapping the genetic family tree of these leafy greens.
Investigating the role of the nasal flora & viral infection on acquisition of Pneumococcus
Researchers at LSTM, along with colleagues at the University of Edinburgh and the University Medical Center Utrecht have looked at the impact of the natural microbial flora or microbiota in the nose and viral co-infection on pneumococcal acquisition in healthy adults.
BU researchers: Allowing the sale of buprenorphine without a prescription could save lives
In an effort to address the opioid epidemic in new, safe and effective ways, increasing access to buprenorphine, without a prescription, could prove helpful for treating persons with opioid use disorder (OUD), according to a Viewpoint in this week's JAMA.
Research yields new clues to the origin of Tamu Massif
The discovery of Tamu Massif, a gigantic volcano located about 1,000 miles east of Japan, made big news in 2013 when researchers reported it was the largest single volcano documented on earth, roughly the size of New Mexico.
Thought experiment: Switzerland without fossil fuels. Can that succeed?
A new Empa study shows how much work still lies ahead of us if Switzerland is to do without fossil fuels in the future.
Does genetic testing pose psychosocial risks?
For the last quarter century, researchers have been asking whether genetic information might have negative psychosocial effects.
Life is tough but so are worms -- thanks to mom
Numerous studies show that the legacy of hardship can be passed from one generation to the next.
Study shows potential for reduced methane from cows
An international team of scientists has shown it is possible to breed cattle to reduce their methane emissions.
CNIC is the coordinator of an international consensus document on the use of magnetic resonance
CNIC has coordinated the first international consensus document providing guidelines on the conduct of magnetic resonance imaging studies after a myocardial infarction in clinical trials or experimental models.
Research team deciphers enzymatic degradation of sugar from marine alga
Enzymes are biocatalysts that are crucial for the degradation of seaweed biomass in oceans.
Pairing 'glue' for electrons in iron-based high-temp superconductors studied
Newly published research from a team of scientists led by the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory sheds more light on the nature of high-temperature iron-based superconductivity.
How do older adults fare after hip fracture?
The number of daily hours of care people need after a hip fracture has not been well studied.
Unlocking magnetic properties for future faster, low-energy spintronics
An Australian collaboration combines theory and experimental expertise, discovering new magnetic properties of two-dimensional Fe3GeTe2 (FGT) towards spintronic applications promising faster, more efficient computing.
Researchers discover semiconducting nanotubes that form spontaneously
EPFL researchers have discovered a way of making semiconducting, photoluminescent nanotubes form spontaneously in liquid solutions.
Supercomputer shows 'Chameleon Theory' could change how we think about gravity
Supercomputer simulations of galaxies have shown that Einstein's theory of General Relativity might not be the only way to explain how gravity works or how galaxies form.
Treatment target pinpointed for liver cancer in teens and young adults
New findings show how a genetically aberrant, fused protein molecule, created by a liver cell mutation, promotes a rare, difficult to treat, cancer in young people.
Study: Poor women are more hopeful than poor men
The researchers concluded that even when men are poor and unemployed, their recognition and role is tied to work, money, and markets.
Immunotherapy could work against bowel cancers resistant to important targeted treatment
Patients with bowel cancer who have stopped responding to a widely used targeted drug could benefit from immunotherapy, a major new study reveals.
Summer Eurasian nonuniform warming found related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation
The positive-phase of Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) can indeed cause Eurasian summer nonuniform warming, according to a study led by professor Shuanglin Li from Institute of Atmospheric Physics at Chinese Academy of Sciences.
The ancestor of the great white shark
Mackerel sharks are a group consisting of some of the most iconic sharks we know, including the mako shark, the great white shark and Megalodon, the biggest predatory shark.
Snowball the dancing cockatoo has many moves
A sulphur-crested cockatoo named Snowball garnered YouTube fame and headlines a decade ago for his uncanny ability to dance to the beat of the Backstreet Boys.
Cancer genes and the tumor milieu
In a recent study published in Cancer Research, researchers demonstrate the role of an oncogene in altering the immediate environment of tumors.
Grazing animals drove domestication of grain crops
During the Pleistocene, massive herds directed the ecology across much of the globe and caused evolutionary changes in plants.
CNIC scientists identify an essential protein for correct heart contraction and survival
A new study published in Circulation Research shows that loss of cardiac expression of SRSF3 leads to a critical reduction in the expression of genes related to contraction.
Nanobowl arrays endow perovskite solar cells with iridescent colors
The rapid development of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has stimulated great interest in colorful PSCs for aesthetic purposes in various applications including building integrated photovoltaics and wearable electronics.
Sneaky mating may be in female damselfies' interest
New research on damselflies in northern Africa suggests that females may facilitate the reproductive success of inferior males when their health is at risk.
Just the tonic! How an afternoon tipple made from peas could help save the rainforest
Using peas instead of wheat to produce gin significantly reduces the carbon footprint associated with the process.
Is nonmedical opioid use by adolescents associated with later risk of heroin use?
This observational study used data from a survey of behavioral health that included students from 10 Los Angeles-area high schools to examine whether nonmedical prescription opioid use was associated with later risk of heroin use in adolescents.
Molecular energy machine as a movie star
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have used the Swiss Light Source SLS to record a molecular energy machine in action and thus to reveal how energy production at cell membranes works.
Simple 'smart' glass reveals the future of artificial vision
University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have devised a method to create pieces of 'smart' glass that can recognize images without requiring any sensors or circuits or power sources.
Scientists discover origin of cell mask that hides stomach cancer
In a recent study, researchers from Hiroshima University have uncovered the origin of a layer of cells that look like normal stomach lining on top of sites of stomach cancer: it is produced by the cancer tissue itself.
'You all look alike to me' is hard-wired in us, UCR research finds
We are hard-wired to process -- or not process -- facial differences based on race.
Research shows that drinking Matcha tea can reduce anxiety
Using the 'elevated plus maze' test with mice, Japanese researchers have shown that Matcha green tea can reduce anxiety.
Expert panel identifies top climate risks for Canada, potential for adaptation
An expert panel convened by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) has identified Canada's top climate change risks and determined that many costs and damages could be avoided with prompt and thoughtful adaptation.
Blood flow monitor could save lives
A tiny fibre-optic sensor has the potential to save lives in open heart surgery, and even during surgery on pre-term babies.
Yearlong birth control supply would cut unintended pregnancies, costs
By dispensing a year's worth of birth control pills up front, the VA could prevent 583 unintended pregnancies and save $2 million per year on health care costs each year.
More money, more gabapentin
Pharmaceutical companies' payments to doctors may be influencing them to prescribe more expensive, brand-name versions of the pain drug gabapentin, a team of researchers report in the July 8, 2019 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, and the increasing use of the drug suggests it may be being abused. 
Semi-arid land in China has expanded in recent decades and probably continues to expand
Semi-arid regions in China have undergone continuous expansion and a significant drying trend in recent decades.
A study in scarlet Japanese macaques
Researchers assumed that the red faces in Japanese macaques signaled fertility.
Cultural drive breeds war in new evolutionary theory
A new evolutionary model shows that a cultural drive to fight for fighting's sake, even when there is no benefit for the winner, can explain the evolution of intergroup conflict in human societies.
New research shows only half of countries globally have cardiac rehab programs
There is only one cardiac rehab spot for every 12 of those patients to prevent another heart event, according to new research from York University.

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Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.