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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | July 12, 2019


Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, PSU study finds
Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new Portland State University study
'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement
A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so.
Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators
Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production.
Recognizing kidney injury due to burns is improved by artificial intelligence
Many burn victims suffer acute kidney injury, but early recognition of the condition can be challenging.
Seeing greenery linked to less intense and frequent cravings
New research from the University of Plymouth shows that being able to see green spaces from your home is associated with reduced cravings for alcohol, cigarettes and harmful foods.
Possibilities of the biosimilar principle of learning are shown for a memristor-based neural network
Lobachevsky University scientists together with their colleagues from the National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Moscow) and the National Research Center 'Demokritos' (Athens) are working on the hardware implementation of a spiking neural network based on memristors.
Elegant antibody nanoparticles override immunological tolerance of tumors
Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a tumor enzymatic microenvironment-activatable antibody nanoparticle for robust cancer immunotherapy.
Thwack! Insects feel chronic pain after injury
Scientists have known insects experience something like pain since 2003, but new research published today from Associate Professor Greg Neely and colleagues at the University of Sydney proves for the first time that insects also experience chronic pain that lasts long after an initial injury has healed.
Improving care quality for hospitalized socially at-risk patients
Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for hospitalized patients with social risk factors and preparing them for discharge.
Novel nanoparticles deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cell with much higher efficiency
Researchers have developed a significantly improved delivery mechanism for the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method in the liver.
Tightening the tumor-targeting abilities of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy
Seeking to improve upon existing checkpoint inhibitor therapies, scientists have developed a common checkpoint inhibitor (anti-PD-L1) in a nanoparticle formulation, which were activated specifically at tumor sites in mouse models of cancer.
Automated system generates robotic parts for novel tasks
An automated system developed by MIT researchers designs and 3D prints complex robotic parts called actuators that are optimized according to an enormous number of specifications.
Targeting a key protein may keep ovarian cancer cells from spreading
Preventing a protein from doing its job may keep a certain type of ovarian cancer cell from growing and dividing uncontrollably in the lab, according to a new study from Penn State College of Medicine.
School suspensions related to increases in subsequent offending
A new study took a longitudinal look at how school suspensions are related to offending behaviors that include assault, stealing, and selling drugs.
From the Oscars to the Nobel Prize, winners need to choose their friends wisely
Being friends with an award juror can increase a person's chance of being nominated but decrease their chances of being selected as the victor, according to new research published in the Academy of Management Journal.
How multicellular cyanobacteria transport molecules
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Tübingen have taken a high-resolution look at the structure and function of cell-to-cell connections in filamentous, multicellular cyanobacteria.
Weyl fermions discovered in another class of materials
A particular kind of elementary particle, the Weyl fermions, were first discovered a few years ago.
Lateral extra-articular tenodesis reduces hamstring autograft
The addition of lateral extra-articular tenodesis to a hamstring autograft in knee surgery in young active patients significantly reduces graft failure and persistent anterolateral rotatory laxity at two years post operatively.
Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments
Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons.
Scientists deepen understanding of magnetic fields surrounding Earth and other planets
Now, a team of scientists has completed research into waves that travel through the magnetosphere, deepening understanding of the region and its interaction with our own planet, and opening up new ways to study other planets across the galaxy.
The brain's pathways to imagination may hold the key to altruistic behavior
Boston College researchers used neuroimaging to identify multiple neural pathways in the brain that explain the relationship between imagination and the willingness to help others.
Taking opioids for pain may make it harder to find primary care, study finds
Finding a new doctor for health checkups and general care can pose a challenge to anyone.
Which is the perfect quantum theory?
For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist.
Preterm babies are less likely to form romantic relationships in adulthood
Adults who were born preterm (under 37 weeks gestation) are less likely to have a romantic relationship, a sexual partner and experience parenthood than those born full term.
Researchers reveal mechanisms for regulating temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decompos
Recently, a research team led by Prof. YANG Yuanhe from the Institute of Botany elucidated the mechanisms underlying vertical variations in Q10. Based on the natural gradient of soil profile in Tibetan alpine grasslands, the team collected soil samples at two soil depths and then conducted long-term incubation, SOM decomposition modeling and manipulative experiments.
New technology improves atrial fibrillation detection after stroke
It's important to determine whether stroke patients also experience atrial fibrillation (Afib).
HIV: Reprogramming cells to control infection
Following research on cohorts, scientists from the Institut Pasteur have described the characteristics of CD8 immune cells in these 'HIV controller' subjects.
Rice device channels heat into light
Rice University engineers use their carbon nanotube films to create a device to recycle waste heat.
#BeatEngland, beat sunburn
UV detection stickers trialled by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) researchers at the November 2017 Ashes Test at the Gabba in Brisbane, Australia, prompted 80% of cricket goers who used the stickers to reapply protective sunscreen.
C. difficile resists hospital disinfectant, persists on hospital gowns, stainless steel
Surgical gowns and stainless steel remained contaminated with the pathogen Clostridium difficile even after being treated with the recommended disinfectant.
Small horned dinosaur from China, a Triceratops relative, walked on two feet
Auroraceratops, a bipedal dinosaur that lived roughly 115 million years ago, has been newly described by an international team of researchers led by paleontologist Peter Dodson of the University of Pennsylvania and former student Eric Morschhauser, now of Indiana University of Pennsylvania.
Does autograft choice in ACL reconstruction affect recurrent ACL revision rates
Young athletes who have anterior cruciate ligament surgery are more likely to need an additional surgery if they received a hamstring graft compared to a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.
NASA finds an asymmetric Tropical Storm Barry
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows that Tropical Storm Barry doesn't look like a typical strong tropical cyclone.
UTSA researcher studies how individuals use technology to engage with their cultures
As the nation continues to get more diverse, it's common for immigrant populations in the United States to identify with two or more cultures at the same time.
New study highlights advantages of living-donor liver transplant over deceased donor
New research from UPMC and Pitt shows that living-donor liver transplant offers numerous advantages over deceased-donor transplant, including superior outcomes and less resource utilization.
Examining cognitive, motor development of children exposed prenatally to opioids
Called a systematic review and meta-analysis, this study combined the results of 26 studies to examine the cognitive and motor development of infants and children exposed to opioids prenatally.
Sound mind: Detecting depression through voice
AI algorithms can now more accurately detect depressed mood using the sound of your voice, according to new research by University of Alberta computing scientists.
New gene linked to healthy ageing in worms
Damage to gene causes impaired movement in adult worms.
Root canal work not so bad after all
Root canal work is not as bad as people think when compared to other dental procedures.
Duke-NUS researchers link ageing with changes in brain networks related to cognition
As people age, the way different areas of their brain communicate with one another change, affecting thought processes and attention span.
Maintaining large-scale satellite constellations using logistics approach
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified a critical hidden challenge about replacing the broken satellites in megaconstellations and proposed a unique solution with inventory control methods.
Dartmouth study examines association between care management and outcomes in Medicare ACOs
New research from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that Accountable Care Organization (ACO)-reported care management and coordination activities were not associated with improved outcomes or lower spending for patients with complex needs.
An itch to scratch: NCATS, NIDCR scientists identify potential approach to chronic problem
While scientists have some clues to the causes of troubling chronic itch, effective therapies have been elusive.
Study finds association between air pollution, coronary atherosclerosis
Researchers found that long-term exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide, as well as proximity to vehicular traffic, were associated with severity of coronary artery calcium, or the buildup of plaque in the artery walls.
Is being born preterm, low-birth weight associated with adult social outcomes?
This study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) combined the results of 21 studies to summarize the overall association between being born preterm or low birth weight and later social outcomes as adults, such as ever having a romantic partnership, having sex or becoming a parent, as well as the quality of romantic partnerships and friendships.
Researchers show how AI can be used to more quickly and accurately diagnose breast cancer
Breast ultrasound elastography is an emerging imaging technique used by doctors to help diagnose breast cancer by evaluating a lesion's stiffness in a non-invasive way.
Rise in early onset colorectal cancer not aligned with screening trends
A new study finds that trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger adults, adding to evidence that the rise in early onset CRC is not solely a result of more detection.
The voice is key to making sense of the words in our brain
Scientists at the Basque research centre BCBL conclude that the voice is fundamental for mentally presenting the meaning of words in the brain.
Hear them roar: How humans and chickadees understand each other
Is there something universal about the sounds we make that allows vocal learners -- like songbirds -- to figure out how we're feeling?
Fewer than half of US adults exposed to court-ordered anti-smoking advertisements
The tobacco industry's court-ordered anti-smoking advertisements reached just 40.6% of US adults and 50.5% of current smokers in 2018, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
Researchers push for better policies around toxic chemicals
Portland State University researchers contend that failures to protect human and environmental health from toxic chemicals result from flawed governance, and lay out a plan for improved policies.
The high cost of perfectionism
Professors from University of Houston-Clear Lake, University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee, and University of Houston research how feeling like a fake at work can lead to problems at home.
An entry to optically active oxazolidinones: The use of neutral phosphonium salt catalysts
Oxazolidinones are coveted in the field of pharmacology for their bioactive properties.
Rush unveils quality composite rank
Rush University Medical Center researchers have proposed a rating system that standardizes and combines data from five leading hospital rating systems into an easy-to-understand composite score of one to 10 that will help guide consumer's hospitals choice.
Europe: syphilis notifications up by 70% since 2010
The number of syphilis cases has been consistently going up across Europe since 2010, mostly affecting men who have sex with men living in urban areas.
Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets
A UW team has discovered thriving communities of bacteria in Alaskan 'cryopegs,' trapped layers of sediment with water so salty that it remains liquid at below-freezing temperatures.

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