Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | July 15, 2019


City College-led experts develop flood prediction model
The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking.
SwRI, UTSA researchers create innovative model for sCO2 power generation
Southwest Research Institute and The University of Texas at San Antonio are collaborating to acquire data for a computational model for supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) energy generation.
New UCI-led study uncovers weakness in C. diff toxin
A new study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine (UCI), uncovers the long-sought-after, three-dimensional structure of a toxin primarily responsible for devastating Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).
Surgery before pregnancy linked to increased risk of opioid withdrawal in babies
Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy had an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, found a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Surgery before pregnancy linked to higher risk of opioid withdrawal in babies
Babies whose mothers underwent surgery before pregnancy have an increased risk of opioid withdrawal symptoms at birth, according to a new study done by Dr.
Army game-theory research better allocates military resources, fight cancer
US Army game-theory research using artificial intelligence may help treat cancer and other diseases, improve cybersecurity, deploy Soldiers and assets more efficiently and even win a poker game.
Discovered a new therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease
A study led by researchers of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and published in the journal Nature Neuroscience has identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.
Political support, strong public health systems key to eliminating measles outbreaks worldwide
Strong political support and strong public health systems are necessary to combat measles outbreaks, which are growing in frequency around the world, argue public health experts in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Loose RNA molecules rejuvenate skin, researchers discover
Want to smooth out your wrinkles, erase scars and sunspots, and look years younger?
More farmers, more problems: How smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon
Small-scale farmers are posing serious threats to biodiversity in northeastern Peru -- and the problem will likely only get worse.
Strange new species of duck-billed dinosaur identified
The most complete skull of a duck-billed dinosaur from Big Bend National Park, Texas, is revealed in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology as a new genus and species, Aquilarhinus palimentus.
UCI researchers' deep learning algorithm solves Rubik's Cube faster than any human
A deep reinforcement learning algorithm developed by computer scientists at the University of California, Irvine can solve the Rubik's Cube puzzle in a fraction of a second.
NASA sees heavy rainfall potential in strengthening Tropical Storm Barry
Tropical Storm Barry continued to linger in the Gulf of Mexico, generating a lot of heavy rainfall on Saturday, July 13, 2019.
Scientists create predictive model for hydrogen-nanovoid interaction in metals
Chinese scientists from Hefei Institute of Physical Science and Canadian scientists have produced a theoretical model via computer simulation to predict properties of hydrogen nanobubbles in metal.
Thirty years of unique data reveal what's really killing coral reefs
Coral bleaching is not just due to a warming planet, but also a planet that is simultaneously being enriched with reactive nitrogen from sources like improperly treated sewage, and fertilizers.
Strict state laws and universal background checks linked to lower pediatric firearm-related deaths
States with stricter firearms laws had lower firearm-related deaths among children and adolescents, finds research led by faculty at Children's National in Washington, D.C.
Meet the six-legged superfoods: Grasshoppers top insect antioxidant-rich list
For the first time, a study has measured antioxidant levels in commercially available edible insects.
World's island conifers threatened with extinction from climate change
By estimating climate conditions in which conifer species could thrive if they needed to, a new study identifies which species are at extinction risk due to climate change.
Out of Africa and into an archaic human melting pot
Genetic analysis has revealed that the ancestors of modern humans interbred with at least five different archaic human groups as they moved out of Africa and across Eurasia.
Association of blood extracellular vesicle biomarkers with Alzheimer's disease
Blood samples taken over several years from cognitively normal study participants who developed Alzheimer disease were analyzed along with samples from individuals who did not develop the disease to evaluate whether there is an association between neuronal-enriched extracellular vesicle biomarkers (particles shed by all cells and found in blood) and Alzheimer's disease.
Homeless people are denied basic health care, research finds
A study led by the University of Birmingham, UK, has painted a shaming picture of neglect and discrimination shown towards the homeless when accessing UK health services.
Robert Alfano team identifies new 'Majorana Photons'
Hailed as a pioneer by Photonics Media for his previous discoveries of supercontinuum and Cr tunable lasers, City College of New York Distinguished Professor of Science and Engineering Robert R.
Early human species' teeth provide insight into evolution of breastfeeding
Mount Sinai researchers working as part of an international team have discovered previously unknown breastfeeding patterns of an extinct early human species by studying their 2-million-year-old teeth, providing insights into the evolution of human breastfeeding practices, according to a study published in Nature in July.
Super volcanic eruptions interrupt ozone recovery
Strong volcanic eruptions, especially when a super volcano erupts, will have a strong impact on ozone, and might interrupt the ozone recovery processes.
Despite long-term treatment, HIV persists in spinal fluid, linked to cognition problems
Even after nearly a decade of strict HIV treatment, cells sheltering the virus could be found in the cerebrospinal fluid of half of participants in a national clinical trial of people living with HIV.
Differences in MS patients' cerebrospinal fluid may be key to drugs that halt progression
Effective therapies exist for managing relapsing/remitting MS, but treatment for progressive MS has proved more challenging.
Fossil of smallest old world monkey species discovered in Kenya
Researchers from the National Museums of Kenya, University of Arkansas, University of Missouri and Duke University have announced the discovery of a tiny monkey that lived in Kenya 4.2 million years ago.
Increases in social media use and television viewing associated with increases in teen depression
A new study published in JAMA Pediatrics has revealed that social media use and television viewing are linked to increases in adolescent depressive symptoms.
NASA examines Tropical Storm Barry post-landfall
Tropical Storm Barry made landfall mid-day on July 13, 2019, but infrared satellite imagery from NASA early on July 14 continued to show the heaviest rainmaking storms were still off-shore.
Study demonstrates stress reduction benefits from petting dogs, cats
Just 10 minutes of interacting with cats and dogs produced a significant reduction in students' cortisol, a major stress hormone.
Tiny habitant from Abrolhos bank (Brazil) sheds light on tropical Atlantic biogeography
For the first time, the bivalve mollusc Guyanella clenchi has been reported from Abrolhos Bank, Brazil.
High blood pressure, cholesterol in young adults associated with later heart disease
Elevated blood pressure and cholesterol levels in young adulthood may lead to an increased risk of heart disease later in life, regardless of later in life exposure to these risk factors, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Child psychiatry telephone programs help increase mental health services for children
More than half of the children in the US with mental health problems do not receive needed treatment, often because there are too few child mental health specialists to provide the services needed.
Investigation into fungal infection reveals genetic vulnerability in Hmong
A new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers Caitlin Pepperell and Bruce Klein has identified a specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong people that renders them more susceptible to the disease-causing fungus.
'Artificial intelligence' fit to monitor volcanoes
More than half of the world's active volcanoes are not monitored instrumentally.
Can videogames promote emotional intelligence in teenagers?
A new study has shown that videogames, when used as part of an emotional intelligence training program, can help teenagers evaluate, express, and manage their own emotions immediately after the training.
Turbo chip for drug development
In spite of increasing demand, the number of newly developed drugs decreased continuously in the past decades.
Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management
It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest.
Study of smokers, former smokers in France examines electronic cigarette use association with smoking reduction, relapse
An observational study based on a group of smokers and former smokers in France looked at whether electronic cigarette use was associated with changes in the number of cigarettes smoked, with smoking cessation rates among smokers, and with smoking relapse among former smokers.
Cannabis treatment counters addiction: First study of its kind
An Australian study has demonstrated that cannabis-based medication helps tackle dependency on cannabis, one of the most widely used drugs globally.
The rush to air conditioning in Europe pushed by urbanization and climate change
A new study published in Environmental Science and Policy shows that without adequate and focused policies, many households will rely on air conditioners to adapt to climate change, thus generating even more greenhouse gas emissions.
Warming climate intensifes summer drought in parts of US, study finds
Researchers using climate data from before and after the Industrial Revolution found that in regions with low soil moisture, higher temperatures brought about by climate change led to a 'coupling' of land and atmosphere, which increased the severity of heatwaves.
Genetic study reveals metabolic origins of anorexia
A global study, led by researchers at King's College London and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, suggests that anorexia nervosa is at least partly a metabolic disorder, and not purely psychiatric as previously thought.
Wearing hearing aid may help protect brain in later life
A new study has concluded that people who wear a hearing aid for age-related hearing problems maintain better brain function over time than those who do not.
Is obesity associated with risk of pediatric MS?
A single-center study of 453 children in Germany with multiple sclerosis (MS) investigated the association of obesity with pediatric MS risk and with the response of first-line therapy in children with MS.
Stripping down bacterial armor: A new way to fight anthrax
A new study led by Dr. Antonella Fioravanti in the lab of Prof.
Extinct human species likely breast fed for a year after birth, NIH-funded study suggests
Infants of the extinct human species Australopithecus africanus likely breast fed for up to a year after birth, similar to modern humans but of shorter duration than modern day great apes, according to an analysis of fossil teeth funded in part by the National Institutes of Health.
Combined breast and gynecologic surgery: Study says not so fast
University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in Breast Journal argues against combined approach: Patients undergoing coordinated breast and gynecologic procedures had a significantly longer length of hospital stay, and higher complication, readmission, and reoperation rates compared with patients who underwent single site surgery.
An inflammatory diet correlates with colorectal cancer risk
This new study correlates a proinflamatory diet with the risk of developing colorectal cancer among the Spanish population.
Model development is crucial in understanding climate change
Preliminary evaluation suggests that FGOALS-f3-L can capture the basic patterns of atmospheric circulation and precipitation well, and these datasets could contribute to the benchmark of current model behaviors for the desired continuity of CMIP.
Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function?
Molecular biologists long thought that domains in the genome's 3D organization control how genes are expressed.
Science of microdosing psychedelics remains patchy and anecdotal, say researchers
The practice of taking small, regular doses of psychedelic drugs to enhance mood, creativity, or productivity lacks robust scientific evidence, say scientists.
How expectation influences perception
MIT neuroscientists have identified distinctive patterns of neural activity that encode prior beliefs and help the brain make sense of uncertain signals coming from the outside world.
How much water do snowpacks hold? A better way to answer the question
Researchers have developed a new computer model for calculating the water content of snowpacks, providing an important tool for water resource managers and avalanche forecasters as well as scientists.
A legal framework for vector-borne diseases and land use
Vector-borne diseases -- caused by parasites, viruses, and bacteria transmitted by insects and animals -- account for more than 17% of all infectious diseases on Earth.
Insurance companies: Want to steal your competitors' customers?
Researchers from the United States published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS), which sheds light on just how much it may take for the companies to profitably 'steal' customers from their competitors.
Dietary quality influences microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa
Studying the association between diet quality and microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa revealed that a high-quality diet is linked to more potentially beneficial bacteria, while a low-quality diet is associated with an increase in potentially harmful bacteria.
Children in foster care removed from homes for parental drug use
A research letter analyzed federally mandated data on children in foster care in the United States to examine how many children entered foster care because of parental drug use during the 2000 to 2017 fiscal years.
HIV may affect the brain despite ongoing antiretroviral therapy
HIV-positive patients are living longer thanks to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the virus can remain in some tissues, preventing a total cure.
Defective potassium channels cause headache, not body pain
Defective potassium channels involved in pain detection can increase the chance of developing a headache and could be implicated in migraines, according to research in mice published in eNeuro.
Determining gene function will help understanding of processes of life
Scientists at the University of Kent have developed a new method of determining gene function in a breakthrough that could have major implications for our understanding of the processes of life.
Green light for a new generation of dynamic materials
Researchers from Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Ghent University (UGent) and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have pioneered a novel, dynamic, reprogrammable material -- by using green LED light and, remarkably, darkness as the switches to change the material's polymer structure, and using only two inexpensive chemical compounds.
UMD releases comprehensive review of the future of CRISPR technology in crops
CRISPR is thought of as 'molecular scissors' used to cut and edit DNA, but Yiping Qi, assistant professor at the University of Maryland, is looking far beyond these applications in his new publication in Nature Plants.
Cancer tissue-freezing approach may help more breast cancer patients in lower income countries
A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.
Algae as a resource: Chemical tricks from the sea
The chemical process by which bacteria break down algae into an energy source for the marine food chain, has been unknown - until now.
Study bolsters case that climate change is driving many California wildfires
A new study combs through the many factors that can promote wildfire in California, and concludes that in many, though not all, cases, warming climate is the decisive driver.
New study on the immune system of plants: It works differently than expected
What happens at the molecular level when plants defend against invading pathogens?
HIV: Holes in the immune system left unrepaired despite drug therapy
If they don't receive antiretroviral therapy (ART), most HIV patients see a progressive weakening of their immune system.
Fluorine speeds up two-dimensional materials growth
By spatially confining fluorine, scientists could activate feeding gases while disabling its harmful effects.
'Racist police officer' stereotype may become a self-fulfilling prophecy
Belief in the 'racist police officer' stereotype may become a self-fulfilling prophecy for law enforcement officers and lead to increased support for forceful or threatening policing tactics, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
NASA's aqua satellite documents the brief life of tropical depression 4E
The Eastern Pacific Ocean generated the fourth tropical cyclone of the hurricane season on July 13 and by the next day, it had already weakened into a remnant low pressure area.
Environment, not evolution, might underlie some human-ape differences
Apes' abilities have been unfairly measured, throwing into doubt the assumed belief that human infants are superior to adult chimpanzees, according to a new study by leaders in the field of ape cognition.
Cholesterol-lowering drugs under-prescribed for prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease
Statins, the most commonly used effective lipid-lowering drugs, are significantly underutilized to treat lipid abnormalities in patients with and at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), according to a retrospective study of more than 280,000 patients in Alberta, Canada.
Blood samples from the zoo help predict diseases in humans
Penguins, Asian elephants and many other animal species live in the zoos of Saarbrücken and Neunkirchen.
Baby blue-tongues are born smart
Young Australian eastern blue-tongue lizards (Tiliqua scincoides) are every bit as clever as adults, researchers have found.
Early and ongoing experiences of weight stigma linked to self-directed weight shaming
In a new study published today in Obesity Science and Practice, researchers at Penn Medicine and the University of Connecticut Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity surveyed more than 18,000 adults enrolled in the commercial weight management program WW International, and found that participants who internalized weight bias the most tended to be younger, female, have a higher body mass index (BMI), and have an earlier onset of their weight struggle
2D perovskite materials found to have unique, conductive edge states
A new class of 2D perovskite materials with edges that are conductive like metals and cores that are insulating was found by researchers who said these unique properties have applications in solar cells and nanoelectronics.
Myth-busting study reveals that gamblers can't detect slot machine payout percentages
It's a common sight on casino floors: patrons jumping from slot machine to slot machine before eventually hunkering down at a game that's due for the next big payout.
Persistent HIV in central nervous system linked to cognitive impairment
Many people with HIV on antiretroviral therapy (ART) have viral genetic material in the cells of their cerebrospinal fluid, and these individuals are more likely to experience memory and concentration problems, according to a NIAID-funded study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
How bacteria translate proteins from structurally blocked mRNAs -- using standby
Bacterial ribosomes need a single-stranded ribosome binding site (RBS) to initiate protein synthesis, whereas stable RNA structure blocks initiation.
Maternal secrets of our earliest ancestors unlocked
New research brings to light for the first time the evolution of maternal roles and parenting responsibilities in one of our oldest evolutionary ancestors.
Alternative material for superconducting radio-frequency cavity
In modern synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers, superconducting radio-frequency cavity resonators are able to supply electron bunches with extremely high energy.
Researchers find anorexia genetic variants, redefine it as metabolic and psychiatric
The large-scale genome-wide association study, led by UNC's Cynthia M.
Biocompound from Atlantic Rainforest combats leishmaniasis and Chagas disease
Researchers find that substances synthesized from plant species endemic to the biodiversity hotspot can kill the parasites that cause these neglected diseases.
Sex, lies and crustaceans: New study highlights peculiar reproductive strategies of Daphnia
ponds around the world, tiny creatures known as Daphnia play an essential role in freshwater ecology.
Using building materials to monitor for high enriched uranium
A new paper details how small samples of ubiquitous building materials, such as tile or brick, can be used to test whether a facility has ever stored high enriched uranium, which can be used to create nuclear weapons.
Study shows advantages for stress urinary incontinence surgery
One of the most commonly performed surgeries to treat stress urinary incontinence in women may have better long-term results than another common surgical technique, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic researchers.
Researchers publish new study on citrus greening disease
A new study published by researchers at Virginia Tech with a team of international researchers in Journal of Applied Ecology investigates the thermal suitability for transmission of citrus greening with implications for surveillance and prevention.
Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings
A new study of cabbage crops in New York -- a state industry worth close to $60 million in 2017, according to the USDA -- reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field.
Improving heat recycling with the thermodiffusion effect
In a study recently published in EPJ E, researchers find that the absorption of water vapour within industrial heat recycling devices is directly tied to a physical process known as the thermodiffusion effect.
Study documents impacts of selective logging on Congo's intact forest landscapes
A new study says that the tropical forests of Western Equatorial Africa (WEA) -- which include significant stands of Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) -- are increasingly coming under pressure from logging, poaching, and associated disturbances.
Next generation metagenomics: Exploring the opportunities and challenges
A new expert review highlights the opportunities and methodological challenges at this critical juncture in the growth of the field of metagenomics.
Invasive parrots have varying impacts on European biodiversity, citizens and economy
Non-native parrots can cause substantial agricultural damage and threaten native biodiversity.
Why urban planners should pay attention to restaurant-review sites
Apartment seekers in big cities often use the presence of restaurants to determine if a neighborhood would be a good place to live.
Helping transplanted stem cells stick around and do their jobs
Delivering mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) along with therapeutic stem cells has the potential to reduce host-vs-graft disease and transplant rejection, but MSCs have been plagued by high clearance from the body and immune attack.
Researchers describe new ALS biomarkers, potential new drug targets
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have described unique populations of neurons and associated cells in the spinal cords of patients who died of ALS.
DNA replication machinery captured at atom-level detail
Life depends on double-stranded DNA unwinding and separating into single strands that can be copied for cell division.
Persistent HIV DNA in spinal fluid may be associated with cognitive challenges
HIV DNA remained in the cerebrospinal fluid of half of participants with well-managed HIV (virologic suppression in the plasma), confirming that the central nervous system (CNS) is a major reservoir for latent HIV.
Better river basins network to protect biodiversity in Spain
The European eel (Anguilla anguilla), the freshwater blenny (Salaria fluviatilis), the freshwater pearl mussel (Margaritifera auricularia) and the pronged clubtail (Gomphus graslini) are some of the vulnerable species that are not represented enough in the biodiversity catalogue of the Natural River Basins (RNF) in Spain.
Coupled exploration of light and matter
In quasiparticles known as polaritons, states of light and matter are strongly coupled.
NASA-NOAA satellite tracking Barry through Louisiana, Arkansas
Barry, now a tropical depression, continues moving slowly north through Arkansas and rainfall and flooding remains a concern.
Can magnetic stem cells improve cartilage repair?
Cells equipped with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) can be directed to a specific location by an external magnetic field, which is beneficial for tissue repair.
Paleontology: New light on cichlid evolution in Africa
A collaborative research project carried out under the auspices of the GeoBio-Center at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has developed an integrative approach to the classification of fossil cichlids, and identified the oldest known member of the Tribe Oreochromini.
NASA creates a flood proxy map of areas affected by tropical storm Barry
Even before Tropical Storm Barry made landfall in Louisiana on Saturday, July 13, 2019 it had already dropped a lot of rain on the state.
Ancient Roman port history unveiled
A team of international researchers led by La Trobe University and the University of Melbourne have, for the first time worldwide, applied marine geology techniques at an ancient harbour archaeological site to uncover ancient harbour technologies of the first centuries AD.
A material way to make Mars habitable
New research suggest that regions of the Martian surface could be made habitable with a material -- silica aerogel -- that mimics Earth's atmospheric greenhouse effect.
NIST's quantum logic clock returns to top performance
The quantum logic clock -- perhaps best known for showing you age faster if you stand on a stool -- has climbed back to the leading performance echelons of the world's experimental atomic clocks.
New analysis reveals challenges for drought management in Oregon's Willamette River Basin
In Oregon's fertile Willamette River Basin, where two-thirds of the state's population lives, managing water scarcity would be more effective if conservation measures were introduced in advance and upstream from the locations where droughts are likely to cause shortages.
High-performance sodium ion batteries using copper sulfide
Researchers presented a new strategy for extending sodium ion batteries' cyclability using copper sulfide as the electrode material.
Lower than expected risk of bone density decline with Truvada PrEP
Researchers have shown that among users of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent against AIDS that includes tenofovir (Truvada), those with daily use -- very high adherence -- had only about a 1% average decrease in bone mineral density in the spine and a 0.5% decline in the hip.
New e-cigarette laws could drive some users to smoke more cigarettes
Efforts by the FDA and some cities to limit the availability and appeal of e-cigarettes to young users could drive some existing users to smoke more tobacco cigarettes to get their fix, according to new research from Duke Health, scheduled to be published July 15, 2019 in the journal Substance Use & Misuse.
Mastering a prickly problem in ferrofluids
Computer simulation accurately captures the beguiling motion of a liquid magnetic material.
New biomarker-guided strategy has potential for liver cancer treatment
A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discovered a cellular pathway tied to cancer that may be beneficial in reducing side effects and extending duration of immunotherapy in some patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer.
Study shows widespread global implementation of WHO's 'Treat All' HIV recommendation
A new study published in the Journal of the International AIDS Society shows that the World Health Organization's (WHO) 2015 recommendation for immediate treatment of all people living with HIV has become the standard of care across HIV clinics in countries around the world.
Reducing seizures by removing newborn neurons
Removing new neurons born after a brain injury reduces seizures in mice, according to new research in JNeurosci.
Curbing indoor air pollution in India
Clean cooking energy transitions are extremely challenging to achieve, but they offer enormous potential health, environmental, and societal benefits.
Unlocking chemo-resistance in cancer
Associate Professor Hamsa Puthalakath's explanation of why some cancers don't respond to treatment with one of the most effective chemotherapy drugs: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has the potential to lead to: a lab test to check for 5-FU resistance, which would reduce unnecessary chemotherapy treatments; a new drug to turn off 5-FU in resistance; and he finds 5-FU resistance is linked to a the protein 'BOK,' the function of which has stumped scientists for decades.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.