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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | July 19, 2019


NIH study links air pollution to increase in newborn intensive care admissions
Infants born to women exposed to high levels of air pollution in the week before delivery are more likely to be admitted to a newborn intensive care unit (NICU), suggests an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.
Astronauts less likely to faint on Earth if they exercise in space; findings may help others with fainting issues
Up to two hours of endurance and resistance exercises daily during a long space flight mission, combined with IV fluid replacement after landing, helps astronauts prevent dizziness and fainting during normal activity when they return to Earth.
Sustainable land management key to reducing Amazon wildfires, study shows
The unrelenting deforestation of the Amazon region could lead to a dramatic increase to the risk of destructive wildfire outbreaks, research has shown.
Study reveals genetic similarities of osteosarcoma between dogs and children
A bone cancer known as osteosarcoma is genetically similar in dogs and human children, according to the results of a study published today by Tufts University and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope.
Study shows relationship between type of delivery and twins' psychological development
A research team of the University of Malaga (UMA) in the area of Medicine and Psychology has analyzed for the first time the effect of the type of delivery on twins' psychological development and intelligence, demonstrating that cesarean section carries an independent risk in these multiple births.
NIH publishes largest genomic study on type 2 diabetes in sub-Saharan African populations
Researchers at NHGRI have performed the largest GWAS study on type 2 diabetes in the sub-Saharan African populations, revealing an association between the disease and previously unlinked ZRANB3 gene.
Offering children a wide variety and large quantities of snack food encourages them to eat more
Offering children a wide variety and large quantities of snack food encourages them to eat more - and may contribute to weight problems, a new study has found.
Bridging the nanoscale gap: A deep look inside atomic switches
A team of researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology has gained unprecedented insight into the inner workings of an atomic switch.
Quantum interference in service of information technology
Scientists from the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, in collaboration with the University of Oxford and the NIST agency, have shown that quantum interference enables processing of large sets of data faster and more accurately than with standard methods.
Music can be a viable alternative to medications in reducing anxiety before anesthesia
Music is a viable alternative to sedative medications in reducing patient anxiety prior to a peripheral nerve block procedure, according to a new Penn Medicine study.
Study sheds light on the darker parts of our genetic heritage
More than half of our genome consists of transposons, DNA sequences that are reminiscent of ancient, extinct viruses. Transposons are normally silenced by a process known as DNA methylation, but their activation can lead to serious diseases.
Cigarette butts hamper plant growth -- study
Researchers have shown for the first time that cigarette butts reduce plant growth.
Atomically precise models improve understanding of fuel cells
Simulations from researchers in Japan provide new insights into the reactions occurring in solid-oxide fuel cells by using realistic atomic-scale models of the electrode active site based on microscope observations instead of the simplified and idealized atomic structures employed in previous studies.
What do the red 'ornaments' of female macaques mean?
Scientists demonstrated that, contrary to what had been assumed for several years, colour variations among female macaques do not precisely indicate the time of ovulation.
Ivacaftor may reduce common infections in patients with CF
Patients with cystic fibrosis who take ivacaftor appear to have fewer respiratory infections over time than those not taking the drug, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
Successful application of machine learning in the discovery of new polymers
As a powerful example of how artificial intelligence (AI) can accelerate the discovery of new materials, scientists in Japan have designed and verified polymers with high thermal conductivity -- a property that would be the key to heat management, for example, in the fifth-generation (5G) mobile communication technologies.
Marijuana use among northern California women before, during pregnancy
An observational study of pregnant women in Northern California suggests marijuana use before and during pregnancy has increased over time.
Chest X-rays contain information that can be harvested with AI
The most frequently performed imaging exam in medicine, the chest X-ray, holds 'hidden' prognostic information that can be harvested with artificial intelligence (AI).
Analysis result of the proxy-method based retrievals from GOSAT2
Greenhouse gasses Observing SATellite-2 (GOSAT-2) developed jointly by the Ministry of the Environment, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and the National Institute for Environmental Studies was successfully launched on October 29, 2018 from JAXA Tanegashima Space Center.
3q29 deletion survey: distinct social profile, high ASD risk
3q29 deletion syndrome is a strong risk factor for both schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder.
Space research helps patients on Earth with low blood pressure condition
With the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaching, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers are publishing heart-related space research that helps us to understand the problem of low blood pressure.
Is 2016 US presidential election associated with preterm births among Latina women?
A national population-based study suggests the 2016 US presidential election may have been associated with an increase in preterm births among Latina women in the United States.
Smart irrigation model predicts rainfall to conserve water
A predictive model combining information about plant physiology, real-time soil conditions and weather forecasts can help make more informed decisions about when and how much to irrigate.
Understanding the mode of action of the primaquine: New insights into a 70 year old puzzle
Researchers at LSTM have taken significant steps in understanding the way that the anti-malarial drug primaquine (PQ) works, which they hope will lead to the development of new, safer and more effective treatments for malaria.
Teacher treatment of students factors into racial gap in school suspensions
An analysis led by Brown sociologist Jayanti Owens found that different treatment of black and white students accounted for half of the racial gap in school suspensions and expulsions among 5- to 9-year-old children.
Newly discovered biosynthetic pathway in bacteria recipe for drug discovery and production
Researchers at the University of Illinois and University of California, Los Angeles described a novel biochemical strategy used by bacteria to synthesize natural products.
Newly discovered neural pathway processes acute light to affect sleep
Either to check the time or waste time, people often look at their smartphones after waking in the middle of the night.
Taking out the protein garbage becomes more difficult as neurons age
As cells age, their ability to shed harmful refuse declines.
Boosting the discovery of new drugs to treat spinal cord injuries using zebrafish
A research team led by Leonor Saúde, Principal Investigator at Instituto de Medicina Molecular, in partnership with the company Technophage, SA, has designed a simple and efficient platform that uses zebrafish to discover and identify new drugs to treat spinal cord lesions.
In the Global South less than one-third of high blood pressure patients treated
Healthcare in low- and middle-income countries is poorly prepared for the increasing number of high blood pressure (ie hypertension) disorders.
Discovering how diabetes leads to vascular disease
A team of UC Davis Health scientists and physicians has identified a cellular connection between diabetes and one of its major complications -- blood vessel narrowing that increases risks of several serious health conditions, including heart disease and stroke.
Heat flow through single molecules detected
Researchers develop ways to measure and explain heat transport through a single molecule.
NASA sees Tropical Storm Danas track through the East China Sea
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Danas moving through the East China Sea on July 19, 2019.
More women using cannabis daily before and during pregnancy, Kaiser Permanente research finds
The number of women using cannabis in the year before they get pregnant and early in their pregnancies is increasing, and their frequency of use is also rising, according to new data from Kaiser Permanente.
2016 election linked to increase in preterm births among US Latinas
A significant jump in preterm births to Latina mothers living in the U.S. occurred in the nine months following the November 8, 2016 election of President Donald Trump, according to a study led by a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
KIST uesed eco-friendly composite catalyst and ultrasound to remove pollutants from water
Developed eco-friendly, low-cost, and high-efficiency wastewater processing catalyst made from agricultural byproduct, and High efficiency and removal rate achieved through application of ultrasound stimulation, leading to high expectation for the development of an environmental hormone removal system.
Routine blood tests could predict diabetes
A study that looked at data on more than 900,000 VA patients showed that elevated blood glucose levels detected in routine outpatient tests, though well below diagnostic thresholds, predicted diabetes within 5 years.
USF geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet collapse
New radar technology allowed USF geoscientists to look at Greenland's dynamic ice-ocean interface that drives sea level rise.
Hearing loss tied with mental, physical, and social ailments in older people
Hearing loss has a profound impact on older people, as it can lead to anxiety, restricted activity, and perhaps even cognitive decline and dementia.
Turkestan cockroach selling online is a companion of the common household cockroach
The Turkestan cockroach (commonly known as the red runner roach or rusty red roach), which is popular as food for pet reptiles, has an interneuron extremely sensitive to sex pheromones emitted by American cockroaches, providing evidence that the Turkestan cockroach is phylogenetically close to the American cockroach and the smoky brown cockroach belonging to the genus Periplaneta.
Predicting long-term risk of death from chest X-rays
Researchers in this study looked at whether a computing system that analyzed data from thousands of chest X-rays of smokers and nonsmokers and developed a risk score could predict long-term risk of death.
X-ray mapping enhances potential of lightweight magnesium
A World-first study by Monash University, published in Nature Communications, has discovered a technique for creating stronger, lightweight magnesium alloys.
Heat transport through single molecules
International team of researchers with participation of the University of Konstanz achieves breakthrough in the area of heat transport at molecular scales
An air-stable and waterproof lithium metal anode
The instability of lithium metal anode in air and the dendrite growth limit its applications.
Take a bath 90 minutes before bedtime to get better sleep
Biomedical engineers at UT Austin have found a way for people to get better shuteye.
Operative versus non-operative treatment for 2-part proximal humerus fracture
Although increasingly used, the benefit of surgical treatment of displaced 2-part proximal humerus fractures has not been proven.
New research finds private practice physicians less likely to maintain electronic records
The research led by Jordan Everson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), finds striking differences in use of electronic health records (EHRs) among more than 291,000 physicians included in the study.
Biologist leads pioneering study on stress
A biologist at Louisiana State University conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds.
Flexible user interface distribution for ubiquitous multi-device interaction
KAIST researchers have developed mobile software platform technology that allows a mobile application (app) to be executed simultaneously and more dynamically on multiple smart devices.
X-ray laser sight reveals drug targets
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have published a review on serial femtosecond crystallography, one of the most promising methods for analyzing the tertiary structure of proteins.

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