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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | July 24, 2019


Outcompeting cancer
Suppressing the capacity of tumors to destroy the healthy tissue that surrounds them is essential for fighting cancer-induced morbidity and mortality.
Springer Nature publishes study for a CERN next generation circular collider
Back in January, CERN released a conceptual report outlining preliminary designs for a Future Circular Collider (FCC), which if built, would have the potential to be the most powerful particle collider the world over.
Genome research shows that the body controls the integrity of heritable genomes
Writing in Developmental Cell, scientists at the University of Cologne presented new findings that challenge established concepts of genetic inheritance.
Molecule reduces accumulation of toxic protein in Parkinson's disease model
The discovery supports GM1 ganglioside as a potential target for Parkinson's therapy.
Scientists pinpoint new mechanism that impacts HIV infection
A team of scientists led by Texas Biomed's Assistant Professor Smita Kulkarni, Ph.D. and Mary Carrington, Ph.D., at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, published results of a study that pinpointed a long noncoding RNA molecule which influences a key receptor involved in HIV infection and progression of the disease.
Diet of traditional Native foods revealed in hair samples
University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers have linked specific chemical signatures found in human hair with a diet of traditional Yup'ik foods.
Rising CO2 levels could boost wheat yield but slightly reduce nutritional quality
Levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are rising, which experts predict could produce more droughts and hotter temperatures.
NASA's Terra sees the end of Atlantic Tropical Depression 3
The third tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season didn't last long.
One dose of HPV vaccine may be enough, Australian research finds
One dose of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has comparable effectiveness to 2 or 3 doses for preventing cervical pre-cancer, according to a new study.
Active pharmaceutical ingredients can persist in the environment
A study finds trace levels of medicines in drinking water from private wells.
How to consider nature's impact on mental health in city plans
An international team led by the University of Washington and Stanford University has created a framework for how city planners and municipalities around the world can start to measure the mental health benefits of nature and incorporate those into plans and policies for cities and their residents.
Targeted therapy erdafitinib effective for patients with advanced bladder cancer and specific gene mutations
A Phase II clinical trial led by MD Anderson found that treatment with the FGFR inhibitor erdafitinib was effective in 40% of patients with metastatic bladder cancers marked by FGFR3 mutations.
How random tweaks in timing can lead to new game theory strategies
Most game theory models don't reflect the relentlessly random timing of the real world.
America's packaged food supply is ultra-processed
Americans are overexposed to products that are high in energy, saturated fat, sugar and salt, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study that reports the United States packaged food and beverage supply in 2018 was ultra-processed and generally unhealthy.
KIST-Stanford team develops new material for wearable devices able to restore conductivity
Development of nanocomposite material simultaneously possessing high stretchability, high conductivity, and self-healability.
How nature builds hydrogen-producing enzymes
A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Oxford has discovered how hydrogen-producing enzymes, called hydrogenases, are activated during their biosynthesis.
How climate change disrupts relationships
Plants rely on bees for pollination; bees need plants to supply nectar and pollen.
Visits to the dentist decline in old age, especially among minorities
Visits to the dentist drop significantly after adults turn 80, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa.
New treatment program offers hope for controlling wombat mange
New research from the University of Tasmania is offering hope that the deadly mange disease affecting Tasmanian wombats could eventually be brought under control for wild individuals and populations.
Does one size does fit all? A new model for organic semiconductors
A team including researchers from Osaka University has used a single rubrene crystal to investigate the room temperature behavior of organic single crystals, and in so doing have dispelled previously-held assumptions based on inorganic semiconductor behavior.
University of Toronto researchers show kids widely exposed to smoking in movies
More than half of the top-grossing movies in Ontario in the past 16 years featured smoking, according to University of Toronto researchers with the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit -- and most of these films were rated as acceptable for youth.
Accidental infant deaths in bed tripled from 1999 to 2016 in the US
Although sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been on the decline, a new study shows that infant deaths from accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed have more than tripled between 1999 and 2016 in the US with increases in racial inequalities.
Monarch butterflies rely on temperature-sensitive internal timer while overwintering
The fact that millions of North American monarch butterflies fly thousands of miles each fall and somehow manage to find the same overwintering sites in central Mexican forests and along the California coast, year after year, is pretty mind-blowing.
A peek at the birth of the universe
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is set to become the largest radio telescope on Earth.
New data fills research gaps on weight loss experiences for minority groups
The use of intensive lifestyle interventions focused on altering dietary and physical activity habits using behavioral strategies can produce sustained weight loss among African-Americans and Hispanics who have type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a new study published online today in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society.
Mediterranean diet during pregnancy associated with improved maternal health outcomes
A new clinical trial found women who followed a Mediterranean-style diet during pregnancy, including a daily portion of tree nuts (half being walnuts) and extra virgin olive oil, had a 35 percent lower risk of gestational diabetes and on average, gained 2.75 pounds less, compared to women who received standard prenatal care.
Cellular soldiers designed to kill cancer cells that get loose during surgery
Biomedical engineers at Vanderbilt University have discovered a method to track down and kill escaping cancer cells during tumor removal surgeries.
Genes underscore five psychiatric disorders
A group of international doctors has uncovered the genes that contribute to the development of ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, major depression and schizophrenia.
Closing the terahertz gap: Tiny laser is an important step toward new sensors
In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules in pharmaceuticals or classify tissue in patients' skin, researchers have created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip.
Artificial throat could someday help mute people 'speak'
Most people take speech for granted, but it's actually a complex process that involves both motions of the mouth and vibrations of folded tissues, called vocal cords, within the throat.
Picky pathogens help non-native tree species invade
Trees have many natural enemies, including pathogens that have evolved to attack certain tree species.
Private equity-backed acquisitions of dermatology practices
This observational study describes the scope of private equity-backed acquisitions of dermatology practices in the United States.
Pupil dilation and heart rate, analyzed by AI, may help spot autism early
Autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders often aren't diagnosed until a child is a few years of age, when behavioral interventions and speech/occupational therapy become less effective.
Half of young drinkers are unaware of health messages on alcohol packaging
Just half of 11-19 year old drinkers recall seeing health messages or warnings on alcohol packaging -- despite being an important target market for this information, according to new research.
Viral HIV vaccine gives durable protection against 'death star' strain
Efforts to develop an effective HIV vaccine have repeatedly stumbled on one tough research strain, SIVmac239.
Study finds meal timing strategies appear to lower appetite, improve fat burning
Researchers have discovered that meal timing strategies such as intermittent fasting or eating earlier in the daytime appear to help people lose weight by lowering appetite rather than burning more calories, according to a report published online today in the journal Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society.
High blood sugar increases pancreatic cancer rate
High blood sugar may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
Hospital-acquired C. diff associated with substantial costs
A study by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America determines the cost and length of stay attributed to hospital-acquired Clostridioides difficile infections.
Artificial intelligence solution improves clinical trial recruitment
Clinical trials are a critical tool for getting new treatments to people who need them, but research shows that difficulty finding the right volunteer subjects can undermine the effectiveness of these studies.
New technique could help engineer polluted water filter, human tissues
Scientists can turn proteins into never-ending patterns that look like flowers, trees or snowflakes, a technique that could help engineer a filter for tainted water and human tissues.
Exploring genetic 'dark matter,' researchers gain new insights into autism and stroke
For the brain to function smoothly, its cells must carefully regulate which proteins are produced and when.
Too much caffeine during pregnancy may damage baby's liver
Having too much caffeine during pregnancy may impair baby's liver development and increase the risk of liver disease in adulthood, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology.
Risk of death among postmenopausal women with normal weight and high abdominal fat
Postmenopausal women with normal weight (body mass index 18.5 to 24.9) and central obesity (waist circumference greater than 88 cm) are at higher risk of death compared to women with normal weight and no central obesity.
Developing technologies that run on light
Researchers are designing a nanoscale photon diode -- a necessary component that could bring us closer to faster, more energy-efficient computers and communications that replace electricity with light.
Skoltech scientists developed a novel method to fine-tune the properties of carbon nanotubes
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) have developed a novel method to fine-tune the optoelectrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by applying an aerosolized dopant solution on their surface, thus opening up new avenues for SWCNT application in optoelectronics.
Valleytronics core theory for future high-efficiency semiconductor technology
Professor Jae Dong Lee's team developed anomalous current and suggested a control mechanism by forming valley domain.
The climate is warming faster than it has in the last 2,000 years
In contrast to pre-industrial climate fluctuations, current, anthropogenic climate change is occurring across the whole world at the same time.
New study identifies causes of multidecadal climate changes
A new reconstruction of global average surface temperature change over the past 2,000 years has identified the main causes for decade-scale climate changes.
Opioid prescribing rates higher in US compared with other countries
Physicians in the United States may prescribe opioids more frequently to patients during hospitalization and at discharge when compared to their physician peers in other countries, according to a recently published study led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
A new framework to study congenital heart defects
In a new study published in the scientific journal Nature, a team of researchers at the Gladstone Institutes, in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg, reveal for the first time the full spectrum of cells that come together to make a heart at the earliest stages of embryo formation.
Screen time no child's play
Experts are urging parents to brush up on national guidelines following a rapid rise in screen time on electronic devices for children under 2.
'Terminators' on the Sun trigger plasma tsunamis and the start of new solar cycles
In a pair of new papers, scientists paint a picture of how solar cycles suddenly die, potentially causing tsunamis of plasma to race through the Sun's interior and trigger the birth of the next sunspot cycle only a few short weeks later.
Decoding the causes of motor neuron disease: A new study shows the impact of genetics
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have conducted the largest ever study involving 1117 people diagnosed with motor neurone disease to address the question of ''nature versus nurture'' in the causes of MND.
Family experience influences diabetes risk, management for African Americans
African American families not only share a higher risk for Type 2 diabetes, but many myths and misconceptions about the disease are often passed on from one generation to the next.
Clues on how soils may respond to climate change found
Rock core samples from a period of warming millions of years ago indicate soils contributed to a rapid rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas and suggest modern climate models may overestimate Earth's ability to mitigate future warming, according to an international team of scientists.
KDD teams tap advanced data science to tackle societal challenges
KDD 2019, the premier interdisciplinary data science conference, announced KDD Cup 2019, the 23rd annual data mining and knowledge discovery competition organized by the ACM Special Interest Group on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining.
Climate change could revive medieval megadroughts in US Southwest
A study published in Science Advances provides the first comprehensive theory for why there were clusters of megadroughts in the American Southwest during Medieval times.
Pilot study of 5-hour molecular test accurately distinguishes malignant and benign breast tumors
A team led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators reports that a new laboratory test they developed to identify chemical changes to a group of cancer-related genes can accurately detect which breast tumors are cancerous or benign, and do it in far less time than gold-standard tests on biopsied breast tissue.
New study explains a secret to more efficient learning
A new study could hold the key to learning languages, teaching children colors or even studying complex theories.
Found: Fastest eclipsing binary, a valuable target for gravitational wave studies
Observations made with a new instrument developed for use at the 2.1-meter telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory have led to the discovery of the fastest eclipsing white dwarf binary yet known.
Time heals all wounds, but this adhesive can help
What if your Band-Aid® actually helped close your cuts and scrapes faster?
3D printed pill samples gut microbiome to aid diagnosis and treatment
A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a 3D printed pill that samples bacteria found in the gut -- known as the microbiome -- as it passes through the gastrointestinal tract (GI).
Penn engineers' 'LADL' uses light to serve up on-demand genome folding
The way in which that linear sequence of genes are packed into the nucleus determines which genes come into physical contact with each other, which in turn influences gene expression.
Volcanoes shaped the climate before humankind
Five large volcanic eruptions occurred in the early 19th century.
Amoeba builds barriers for protection against bacteria
Dictyostelium discoideum, the soil-dwelling single-celled amoeba that feeds on bacteria, builds a barrier around its colonies that counteracts bacterial attempts to penetrate them, facilitates amoebal feeding and protects them from oxidative stress.
Waist size is a forgotten factor in defining obesity
A new study from the University of Iowa published in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that some people considered to be a normal weight could unknowingly be at high risk for obesity-related health issues.
Hair could be the key to better mental-illness diagnosis in teens
It's possible that a lock of hair could one day aid in the diagnosis of depression and in efforts to monitor the effects of treatment, said the author of a new study examining cortisol levels in the hair of teens.
South Florida partnership using data to guide stroke triage decisions
A progressive Emergency Medical Services (EMS)-driven partnership in South Florida has expedited access to lifesaving care for stroke patients.
ADVANCE study provides evidence for shift to dolutegravir-containing ART in SA
The Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute and partners have presented evidence for a shift to dolutegravir-containing antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.
Former NFL players may face higher risk of atrial fibrillation
Former National Football League (NFL) players were nearly 6 times more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AF), a type of irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke.
Microrobots show promise for treating tumors
A pair of researchers in Caltech's Division of Engineering and Applied Science are working on an entirely new form of treatment --microrobots that can deliver drugs to specific spots inside the body while being monitored and controlled from outside the body.
Fungal compound deodorizes skunk smell
Being sprayed by a skunk is no fun for people or their pets, and the strong, stinky secretions can serve as a nasty reminder of the wildlife encounter for days or weeks.
Independent, private firms pollute less than public firms, study shows
Private, independent firms are less likely to pollute and incur EPA penalties than public and private equity-owned firms, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
An apple carries about 100 million bacteria -- good luck washing them off
Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, a new study shows that organic apples harbor a more diverse and balanced bacterial community -- which could make them healthier and tastier than conventional apples, as well as better for the environment.
Study highlights the benefits of a US salt reduction strategy to US food industry
New research, published in The Milbank Quarterly, highlights the potential health and economic impact of the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) proposed voluntary salt policy on workers in the US food industry.
Multiple concurrent central lines increases risk for bloodstream infection
A study by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America demonstrates the relationship between multiple concurrent central lines and the increased risk for bloodstream infections.
Medical imaging rates during pregnancy
Researchers looked at rates of medical imaging (CT, MRI, conventional x-rays, angiography, fluoroscopy and nuclear medicine) during pregnancy in this observational study that included nearly 3.5 million pregnant women in the United States and Canada from 1996 to 2016.
Disrupting immune cell behavior may contribute to heart disease and failure, study shows
A new study, led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, provides evidence that when circulating anti-inflammatory white blood cells known as monocytes fail to properly differentiate into macrophages -- the cells that engulf and digest cellular debris, bacteria and viruses -- certain forms of heart disease may result.
Mouse, not just tick: New genome heralds change in Lyme disease fight
As Lyme disease increases, researchers have taken a significant step toward finding new ways to prevent its transmission.
Sisters improve chances of reproduction in Asian elephants
Researchers at the University of Turku found that the presence of a maternal sister was positively and significantly associated with annual female reproduction in a population of working elephants in Myanmar.
Army project may advance quantum materials, efficient communication networks
A US Army project exploring novel applications of superconducting resonators has discovered these systems may be used to simulate quantum materials impossible to otherwise fabricate.
Immune therapy takes a 'BiTE' out of brain cancer
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have created a new method that could make immune therapy more effective again brain tumors and expand its use against other types of solid tumors.
MERS-CoV vaccine is safe and induces strong immunity in Army-led first-in-human trial
The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research conducted a Phase 1 first-in-human trial of a Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS CoV) vaccine candidate that was shown to be safe, well-tolerated, and induced a robust immune response comparable to response seen in survivors of natural MERS CoV infection.
Elephant extinction will raise carbon dioxide levels in atmosphere
Forest elephants engineer the ecosystem of the entire central African forest, and their catastrophic decline toward extinction has implications for carbon policy.
Physician experience and practice area affects decision-making for endovascular treatment
A new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 16th Annual Meeting found significant differences in decision-making for endovascular treatment (EVT) when the physician's experience with EVT use and practice area were taken into consideration.
Consuming 60 grams of nuts a day improves sexual function
Researchers from the Human Nutrition Unit of the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona/Spain) have conducted the first nutritional intervention study with healthy participants of reproductive age in order to determine if regular consumption of nuts has any effect on sexual function.
Fracking activities may contribute to anxiety and depression during pregnancy
A new study led by a researcher at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health identifies a link between proximity to hydraulic fracking activities and mental health issues during pregnancy.
With bitter foods, what you eat determines what you like to eat
Introducing plant-based foods to a diet is a common-sense approach to healthy eating, but many people don't like the taste of vegetables, bitter greens, in particular.
Alzheimer's protein is likely held together with many weak chemical interactions
The chemical interactions that give proteins their shape may be weaker and more numerous than previously recognized.
Antimalarial treatments less effective in severely malnourished children
Researchers have found that severe malnutrition is associated with lower exposure to the antimalarial drug lumefantrine in children treated with artemether-lumefantrine, the most common treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria.
Lobster organs and reflexes damaged by marine seismic surveys
A new study of the impact on marine life of seismic air guns, used in geological surveys of the seafloor, has found that the sensory organs and righting reflexes of rock lobster can be damaged by exposure to air gun signals.
Coping skills program helps social service workers reduce stress, trauma after disasters
University of Illinois social work professors Tara Powell and Kate Wegmann found that a mental health intervention called Caregivers Journey of Hope can bolster social service workers' emotional resilience and ability to cope with the stress and trauma associated with disasters such as Superstorm Sandy.
BU researchers say special "mapping" brain cells could inspire smarter self-driving vehicles
BU neuroscientists say special 'mapping' brain cells could inspire the design of smarter self-driving vehicles.
Scientists complete first assessment of blood abnormalities in Antarctic penguin colony
Through blood tests conducted on 19 adult Adélie penguins breeding at Edmonson Point in Antarctica, researchers found quantities of cell types associated with future cell death, genomic instability or cancer development.
Frog in your throat? Stress might be to blame for vocal issues
A researcher from the University of Missouri has found that there is more to vocal issues than just feeling nervous and that stress-induced brain activations might be to blame.
Magnetic eyelashes: A new source of MRI artifacts
American Journal of Roentgenology researchers used a phantom to show that magnetic eyelashes worn during MRI can cause substantial artifact and that detachment of the eyelashes from the phantom can occur.
What do dragonflies teach us about missile defense?
Research at Sandia National Laboratories is examining whether dragonfly-inspired computing could improve missile defense systems, which have the similar task of intercepting an object in flight, by making on-board computers smaller without sacrificing speed or accuracy.
Reach out and touch someone
A team of University of Utah biomedical engineers are helping develop a prosthetic arm for amputees that can move with the person's thoughts and feel the sensation of touch via an array of electrodes implanted in the muscles of the patient.
Surprising insight into Legionnaires' disease
In order to control cellular processes and thwart the immune system, the bacterium Legionella pneumophilia, the cause of the notorious Legionnaires' disease, releases hundreds of enzymes.
Pottery related to unknown culture was found in Ecuador
Archaeologists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Archeology and Ethnography SB RAS (Russia), Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral (ESPOL) (Ecuador), and Tohoku University (Japan) found shards of ceramic vessels referred to the cultural sediments of early periods of Real Alto site.
Researchers find evidence a cancer drug may be extended to many more patients
Drugs currently used to treat less than 10% of breast cancer patients could have broader effectiveness in treating all cancers, including ovarian and prostate cancers.
Unlocking therapies for hard-to-treat lung cancers
Around 85 percent of lung cancers are classified as non-small-cell lung cancers, or NSCLCs.
Cold, dry planets could have a lot of hurricanes
Study overturns conventional wisdom that water is needed to create cyclones.
Box-sized sensor brings portable, noninvasive fluid monitoring to the bedside
Lina Colucci and colleagues have created a portable device that within 45 seconds accurately detected excess fluid buildup in the legs of seven participants with end-stage kidney failure.
Extra weight in 60s may be linked to brain thinning years later
Having a bigger waistline and a high body mass index (BMI) in your 60s may be linked with greater signs of brain aging years later, according to a study published in the July 24, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Balancing beams: Multiple laser beamlets show better electron and ion acceleration
Researchers at Osaka University show how creating interference patterns with four laser beamlets improves the efficiency of energy transfer when accelerating electron and ion beams.
Quenching scientific curiosity with single-molecule imaging
New experimental insights allow researchers to probe protein-DNA interactions with greater precision.
Findings from CARE Consortium added to global repository for brain injury data
Data from the CARE Consortium, the world's most comprehensive concussion study is now publicly available in a repository aimed at providing traumatic brain injury researchers access to a wealth of new knowledge.
To understand a childhood brain tumor, researchers turn to single-cell analysis
Investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, alongside others, have revealed the cells of origin for specific subtypes of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor.
Researchers develop new technology for multiple sclerosis diagnosis and treatment
Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth®, part of The University of Texas at Dallas, in collaboration with a team from UT Southwestern, have developed technology for a novel diagnostic method for multiple sclerosis (MS).
30,000+ US lives could be saved by reducing air pollution levels below current standard
Research findings from the Center for Air Quality, Climate, and Energy Solutions (CACES) at Carnegie Mellon University show significant human health benefits when air quality is better than the current national ambient air quality standard.
Seeing clearly: Revised computer code accurately models an instability in fusion plasmas
Subatomic particles zip around fusion machines known as tokamaks and sometimes merge, releasing large amounts of energy.
Dangers of the blame game
The moral character of a victim of a product or service failure can influence how much consumers blame the victim for their suffering, which in turn affects how much consumers hold companies responsible.
Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Depression Dalila fading
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of weakening Tropical Depression Dalila in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
Designed protein switch allows unprecedented control over living cells
Scientists have created the first completely artificial protein switch that can work inside living cells to modify or even commandeer the cell's complex internal circuitry.
Light pollution may be increasing West Nile virus spillover from wild birds
House sparrows infected with West Nile virus (WNV) that live in light polluted conditions remain infectious for two days longer than those who do not, increasing the potential for a WNV outbreak by about 41%.
Expanding the limits of personalized medicine with high-performance computing
Imagine that you have a serious medical condition. Then imagine that when you visit a team of doctors, they could build an identical virtual 'twin' of the condition and simulate millions of ways to treat it until they develop an effective treatment.
Study shows stimulation of the ear can help manage Parkinson's symptoms
This study shows stimulation of the ear can help manage Parkinson's symptoms.
Ultrathin transistors for faster computer chips
The next big miniaturization step in microelectronics could soon become possible -- with so-called two-dimensional materials.
Could α-Klotho be a potential biomarker of stress?
Researchers at Osaka University elucidated an interesting association between psychological stress and serum levels of α-Klotho (αKl).
Is deadly Candida auris a product of global warming?
A drug-resistant fungus species called Candida auris, which was first identified 10 years ago and has since caused hundreds of deadly outbreaks in hospitals around the world, may have become a human pathogen in part due to global warming, according to three scientists led by a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
New research has potential for 'unpacking' complex simultaneous emotions in adolescence
Shows for the first time that complex, mixed simultaneous emotions in adolescents could be assessed using an Analogue Emotion Scale.
Hydration sensor could improve dialysis
Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have now developed a portable sensor that can accurately measure patients' hydration levels using a technique known as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry.
Newly identified meningeal lymphatic vessels answers key questions about brain clearance
Meningeal lymphatic vessels at the skull base are found to be the major route for brain clearance.
Worrisome increase in some medical scans during pregnancy
Use of medical imaging during pregnancy increased significantly in the United States, a new study has found, with nearly a four-fold rise over the last two decades in the number of women undergoing computed tomography (CT) scans, which expose mothers and fetuses to radiation.
Atrial fibrillation: New marker for atrial damage discovered
Atrial fibrillation is a common abnormal heart rhythm. It is treated either with medications or by applying heat or extreme cold to destroy small specific tissue areas in the atrium.
Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM
A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend.
High blood pressure treatment and nursing home residents
A team of researchers designed a study to learn more about the best high blood pressure treatments for older adults who live in nursing homes.
Study reveals top tools for pinpointing genetic drivers of disease
A new benchmarking study has determined the best analysis tools for identifying errors in a patient's DNA that are responsible for driving disease.
Study shows extra weight in 60s may be linked to brain thinning years later
Having a bigger waistline and a high body mass index (BMI) in your 60s may be linked with greater signs of brain aging years later, according to a study published by a leading University of Miami neurologist researcher in the July 24, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Is your favorite brand authentic?
Researchers recently discovered that stories about the origins of a company influence whether consumers believe a brand is authentic.

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