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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | July 25, 2019


Virginia Tech researchers lead breakthrough in quantum computing
A team of Virginia Tech chemistry and physics researchers have advanced quantum simulation by devising an algorithm that can more efficiently calculate the properties of molecules on a noisy quantum computer.
Bacteria-killing gel heals itself while healing you
McMaster researchers have developed a novel new gel made entirely from bacteria-killing viruses.
Favorable five-year survival reported for patients with advanced cancer treated with the immunotherapy
A research team led by experts at the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center reports favorable five-year survival rates from the first multidose clinical trial of the immunotherapy drug nivolumab (anti-PD-1) as a treatment for patients whose previous therapies failed to stem their advanced melanoma, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Microbial manufacturing: Genetic engineering breakthrough for urban farming
Researchers at DiSTAP, SMART, MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a new technology that revolutionises the creation of genetic material, enabling drastically accelerated genetic engineering of microbes that can be used to manufacture chemicals used for urban farming.
One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles
The neurotransmitter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts in the muscle, so that during strength training endurance muscle fiber number is decreased.
Exposure to common chemicals in plastics linked to childhood obesity
Exposure to common chemicals in plastics and canned foods may play a role in childhood obesity, according to a study published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
HIV spreads through direct cell-to-cell contact
The spread of pathogens like the HI virus is often studied in a test tube, i.e. in two-dimensional cell cultures, even though it hardly reflects the much more complex conditions in the human body.
Multiple dosing of long-acting rilpivirine in a model of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis
A long-acting antiretroviral agent such as rilpivirine could further improve pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), already shown to be safe and effective at preventing AIDS in high risk populations, as it could overcome problems with poor medication adherence.
NASA finds one burst of energy in weakening Depression Dalila
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite found just a small area of cold clouds in thunderstorms within weakening Tropical Depression Dalila, enough to maintain it as a tropical cyclone.
High-performance flow batteries offer path to grid-level renewable energy storage
A low-cost, high-performance battery chemistry developed by University of Colorado Boulder researchers could one day lead to scalable grid-level storage for wind and solar energy that could help electrical utilities reduce their dependency on fossil fuels.
Study: Reducing greenhouse gas in rocky mountain region has health, financial benefits
Research by Drexel University and the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests that imposing fees on energy producers that emit greenhouse gas could improve the health and financial well-being of the Rocky Mountain region.
Preclinical study of therapeutic strategy for Lafora disease shows promise
A team of scientists have designed and tested in mice a novel and promising therapeutic strategy for treating Lafora Disease (LD), a fatal form of childhood epilepsy.
Einstein's general relativity theory is questioned but still stands for now, team reports
More than 100 years after Albert Einstein published his iconic theory of general relativity, it's beginning to fray at the edges, said Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy.
More can be done to prevent children from having in-flight medical emergencies
Resources are limited on an airplane during an in-flight emergency and access to care is not always immediate.
Worm pheromones protect major crops
Protecting crops from pests and pathogens without using toxic pesticides has been a longtime goal of farmers.
Slowing metabolic rate can prevent detrimental effects of genetic mutations
In a new Northwestern University study, researchers slowed mutant fruit flies' metabolic rates by 50%, and the expected detrimental effects of many mutations never manifested.
What happens when you overdose? (video)
Your body is a delicately balanced chemical system, and if you take too much of a drug you destroy that balance.
Terahertz imaging technique reveals subsurface insect damage in wood
Insect infestation is becoming an increasingly costly problem to the forestry industry, especially in areas experiencing increased droughts and hot spells related to climate change.
Ten-state program increases healthy eating and physical activity at child care facilities
Nearly 1,200 child care programs in 10 states have improved their healthy eating and physical activity standards after participating in Nemours Children's Health System's National Early Care and Education Learning Collaboratives (NECELC) project, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Shark hotspots under worldwide threat from overfishing
In a groundbreaking new study published in the journal Nature, an international team of over 150 scientists from 26 countries combined movement data from nearly 2,000 sharks tracked with satellite tags.
Supervisors driven by bottom line fail to get top performance from employees: Baylor study
Supervisors driven by profits could actually be hurting their coveted bottom lines by losing the respect of their employees, who counter by withholding performance, according to a new study led by Baylor University.
Missile strike false alarm most stressful for less anxious Hawaiians, study finds
After learning that a warning of a missile headed to Hawaii was a false alarm, the most anxious local Twitter users calmed down more quickly than less anxious users, according to a study of tweets before, during and after the event, published by the American Psychological Association.
Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threatened biodiversity
Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment.
Generic mobile phone chargers escalate risk of burn, electrocution
Electric currents generated by mobile phone chargers, particularly from lower-cost generic manufacturers, are causing serious injuries.
Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions
When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown.
NASA's terra satellite finds tropical storm 07W's strength on the side
Wind shear can push clouds and thunderstorms away from the center of a tropical cyclone and that's exactly what infrared imagery from NASA's Terra satellite shows is happening in newly formed Tropical Storm 07W.
A tree stump that should be dead is still alive; here's why
Within a shrouded New Zealand forest, a tree stump keeps itself alive by holding onto the roots of its neighboring trees, exchanging water and resources through the grafted root system.
The origin and future of spam and other online intrusions
What does the future of digital spam look like, what risks could it pose to our personal security and privacy, and what can we do to fight it?
Little helpers for the rainforest
Primate researchers show how monkeys contribute to the regeneration of tropical forests.
Tidewater glaciers: Melting underwater far faster than previously estimated?
A tidewater glacier in Alaska is melting underwater at rates upwards of two orders of magnitude greater than what is currently estimated, sonar surveys reveal.
How the pufferfish got its wacky spines
Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery.
Molecular traffic jam may underlie rare kidney disease, other protein misfolding disorders
Researchers have discovered that some protein-misfolding disorders may arise from a single, previously unrecognized cause: a jam at a specific step in a cellular shipping network called the secretory pathway, which delivers proteins either to the cell surface or one of the cell's protein-disposal systems.
Why companies should not give their customers discounts after service failures
A new study finds that price-based recovery incentives after service failures are negatively associated with the likelihood that subscribers renew their service contracts.
Current guides for starting infants on solid food may lead to overfeeding
Starting 6-month-old infants on solid food in the amounts recommended by standard feeding guides may lead to overfeeding, according to a study by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Researchers suggest empathy be a factor in medical school admissions
The national norms can help to distinguish between two applicants with similar academic qualifications, and identify students who might need additional educational remedies to bolster their level of empathy.
Mapping cells in the 'immortal' regenerating hydra
The tiny hydra, a freshwater invertebrate related to jellyfish and corals, has an amazing ability to renew its cells and regenerate damaged tissue.
Study finds new insights on overdose rates, county segregation, and socioeconomics
Deaths from drug overdoses have risen dramatically in the United States over the past 20 years, and researchers seek to understand complex factors that may affect these deaths.
New model identifies most efficient logistics for military operations
Military deployments to environments lacking basic infrastructure -- whether humanitarian missions or combat operations -- involve extensive logistical planning.
Children with medical emergencies during airline flights have limited aid
Children afflicted with medical emergencies during commercial airline trips tend to have common ailments such as vomiting, fever or allergic reactions -- events that should be easily treated, according to a study led by Duke Health researchers.
These gut bacteria prevent mice from becoming obese -- what could that mean for us?
A specific class of bacteria from the gut prevents mice from becoming obese, suggesting these same microbes may similarly control weight in people, a new study reports.
Revolutionary method could bring us much closer to the description of hyperdiverse faunas
Largely relying on DNA barcoding, rather than traditional practices, a simplified diagnostics method for species description could be the key to revealing Earth's biodiversity before much of it goes extinct.
Penn biochemists streamline construction method for human artificial chromosomes
Researchers describe a new way to form an essential part of the artificial chromosome, called the centromere, by bypassing the biological requirements needed to form a natural one.
Genetic screen identifies genes that protect cells from Zika virus
A new Tel Aviv University study uses a genetic screen to identify genes that protect cells from Zika viral infection.
Transforming biology to design next-generation computers, using a surprise ingredient
A Purdue University group has found ways of transforming structures that occur naturally in cell membranes to create other architectures, like parallel 1nm-wide line segments, more applicable to computing.
Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question
Advanced simulations have solved a problem in turbulent fluid flow that could lead to more efficient turbines and engines.
Airborne particles can send our detox systems into overdrive
As the world gets more and more industrialized, the risk of developing respiratory diseases increases.
When should banks chase debts? New method could help them decide
Banks face financial risks and uncertainty when deciding when to chase consumers who default on their credit card payments and when to let them go.
Technologies for the Sixth Generation Cellular Network
Future wireless data networks will have to reach higher transmission rates and shorter delays, while supplying an increasing number of end devices.
How HIV infection may contribute to wide-ranging metabolic conditions
HIV-infected cells release vesicles that contain a viral protein called Nef, impairing cholesterol metabolism and triggering inflammation in uninfected bystander cells, according to a study published July 25, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Dmitri Sviridov of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia, and colleagues.
Physics of life: Motor proteins and membrane dynamics
Motility is an essential property of many cell types, and is driven by molecular motors.
Georgetown technique using urine suggest individualize bladder cancer treatment possible
Researchers have devised a very promising non-invasive and individualized technique for detecting and treating bladder cancer.
Fracking likely to result in high emissions
Natural gas releases fewer greenhouse gases than other fossil fuels.
How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals
The 3D analysis of crystal structures requires a full 3D view of the crystals.
Trapping female mosquitoes helps curb chikungunya virus
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently developed an Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGP trap) that attracts and captures female mosquitoes looking for a site to lay eggs.
Study calls for legal reform on 'hidden crime' few male victims will talk about
A call for a change in the law to class men, forced to have sex with women, as rape victims has been made in a new study by Lancaster University researchers published today.
To become, or not to become... a neuron
Researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen and Jérôme Bonnefont (VIB-KU Leuven and ULB) have unraveled a new mechanism controlling the switch between growth and differentiation of neural stem cells during brain development.
Paleontology -- new light on cichlid evolution in Africa
A collaborative research project carried out under the auspices of the GeoBio-Center at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has developed an integrative approach to the classification of fossil cichlids, and identified the oldest known member of the tribe Oreochromini.
Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis
Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed.
The cuttlefish may be flashy, but its microbiome is super simple, team reports
In a collaboration led by Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientist Jessica Mark Welch, scientists characterized the microbiome of the European common cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, an animal whose impressive camouflage skills and behavior have long been studied.
Neurobiology -- sushi for synapses
Synapses between nerve cells in the brain undergo constant remodeling, which is the basis of learning.
Physicists from IKBFU create metallic alloy for magnetic refrigerator
Physicists of the Laboratory of Novel Magnetic Materials of the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University study magnetic materials and magnetostructural phase transition in order to create a new magnetic cooling technology.
When a fix for one vision problem causes another
Aging diminishes the ability of the eyes ability to focus up close.
Research finds connecting patients with their community could transform healthcare
Engaging a wider range of resources to connect patients with organizations within their community can help transform healthcare and improve overall well-being, according to new research.
Five or more hours of smartphone usage per day may increase obesity
As smartphones continue to be an inherent part of life and grow as a primary source of entertainment -- particularly among young people -- it leads to a decrease in physical activity.
Biologists and mathematicians team up to explore tissue folding
MIT scientists have now discovered a key feature of embryonic tissue that helps explain how this process is carried out so faithfully each time.
Study reveals how HIV infection may contribute to metabolic conditions
A single viral factor released from HIV-infected cells may wreak havoc on the body and lead to the development of metabolic diseases.
Antibiotics can inhibit skin lymphoma
New research from the LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center at the University of Copenhagen shows, surprisingly, that antibiotics inhibit cancer in the skin in patients with rare type of lymphoma.
Decades after a good-behavior program in grade school, adults report healthier, more successful lives
University of Washington researchers have found that that 'good life' in adulthood can start in grade school, by teaching parents and teachers to build stronger bonds with their children, and to help children form greater attachments to family and school.
The positive and negative role of LRH-1 during inflammation
The research group around Professor Thomas Brunner at the University of Konstanz discovers the role that the LRH-1 protein plays in the immune system -- inhibiting this protein could help treat inflammatory diseases.
Clemson research suggests a practical use for regret, hindsight
Clemson University psychologist Robin Kowalski's recent research reveals that people think about the advice they would give their younger selves more often than many people might think, and for many this mental exercise is anything but futile.
Inherited BRCA2 mutations linked to increased risk of childhood lymphoma
A report from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital links inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene with an increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents.
Attitudes toward race, immigration underscored vote switching in 2016 election
It's estimated that around 9% of voters who supported Barack Obama in 2012 crossed party lines to endorse Donald Trump in 2016 -- but why?
New method enables more extensive preclinical testing of heart drugs and therapies
A new biomimetic culture system mimics the environment of a living organ through continuous electrical stimulation and oxygenation, maintaining viability and functionality of heart slices for six days.
Detox pathway extends lifespan of the worm C. elegans
Mutation in mitochondrial gene doubles the lifespan in the worm C. elegans by turning on a detox pathway, researchers of the Cluster of Excellence CECAD report in Nature Communications.
Gravity changes mass of muscles and bones, which was experimentally observed in space
An international collaboration led by scientists mainly at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that bone and muscle mass are regulated by the altered gravity.
Scientists find clue to 'maternal instinct'
Oxytocin is referred to as the love hormone and is important in the regulation of social and maternal behavior.
Clinical trial identifies new breast cancer drug as a potential therapy for glioblastoma
Ivy Brain Tumor Center at the Barrow Neurological Institute, has released the results of its recent Phase 0 clinical trial of the breast cancer drug ribociclib (Kisqali®) for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma.
Underwater glacial melting occurring much faster than predicted
Underwater melting of tidewater glaciers is occurring much faster than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at Rutgers and the University of Oregon.
Pain and gain: Skin nerves anticipate and fight infection, Pitt research finds
A surprising new discovery in mouse models reveals a previously unknown role for pain in immunity and has implications for treating autoimmune diseases.
New AI tool developed by Dana-Farber identifies cancer outcomes using radiology reports
Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have demonstrated that an artificial intelligence tool can perform as well as human reviewers -- and much more rapidly -- in extracting clinical information regarding changes in tumors from unstructured radiology reports for patients with lung cancer.
T cells trim the fat and protect against obesity
Specialized immune cells protect against obesity by regulating the diverse communities of intestinal bacteria in mice, according to a new study, which shows how changes in gut microbiota can influence the development of metabolic disorders.
Molecular biophysics -- the ABC of ribosome recycling
Ribosomes, the essential machinery used for protein synthesis is recycled after each one round of translation.
Sclerosing agent delivery improvements to protect against malignant pleural effusion
Preclinical trials were held on mice. Senior Research Associate Alexander Deneka (Laboratory of Molecular and Biochemical Bases of Pathogenesis and Therapy of Cancer Diseases, Kazan Federal University) explains that the method in question was first proposed by British scientists; they proved that liquid can be drained from a pleural cavity with the help of a talcum powder solution.
Association of BRCA2 mutations with risk of childhood lymphoma
This research letter reports on the association of BRCA2 gene mutations and potential risk for pediatric or adolescent lymphoma.
NAFTA's demise puts Canada in the 'penalty box,' study shows
A new study from the University of Notre Dame shows that the elimination of the North American Free Trade Agreement would economically hurt Canada, Mexico and the US, but with a surprising twist -- Canada would suffer the most.
Study in mice advances combination immune therapy for ovarian cancer
Delivering two federally approved immunity-altering drugs together significantly extended the lives of mice injected with human ovarian cancer cells, an early proof-of-concept experiment that may advance treatment for the most deadly -- although rare -- gynecologic malignancy in humans, according to scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center who performed the research.
Tobacco-21 laws can lower smoking prevalence in the 18-20 age group
A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction found that raising the legal age of sale of cigarettes from 18 to 21 in the US was associated with a 39% reduction in the odds of regular smoking in 18- to 20-year-olds who had experimented with cigarettes.
Electricity-driven undersea reactions may have been important for the emergence of life
In deep sea hydrothermal vents, water heated by Earth's mantle flows into the ocean, precipitating various minerals, including metal sulfides.
Researchers discover new cause of cell aging
New research from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering could be key to our understanding of how the aging process works.
US emergency medical services underrepresented of women and minorities
Women and minority groups are underrepresented in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in the US and workforce diversity is not likely undergo big changes anytime soon, according to a new 10-year study of almost 700,000 newly certified emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics, published in Prehospital Emergency Care.
Signals from skin cells control fat cell specialization
When cells change to a more specialized type, we call this process cellular differentiation.
Working memory is structured hierarchically
Researchers in cognitive psychology at HSE University have experimentally demonstrated that the colors and orientations of objects are stored and processed independently in working memory.
Researchers discover the science behind giving up
Findings, reported July 25 in Cell, offer new insight into the complex world of motivation and reward by discovering the science behind giving up.
Association between number of thyroidectomies performed by surgeon, complications
This observational study examined at what point an increasing number of operations to remove the thyroid performed annually by a surgeon is associated with a lower rate of complications among patients.
Newly identified rice gene confers multiple-herbicide resistance
A rice gene that renders the crop resistant to several widely used beta-triketone herbicides has been identified, researchers report, revealing the genetic cause of herbicide susceptibility that has been identified in some important rice varieties.
Underwater glacial melting is occurring at higher rates than modeling predicts
Researchers have developed a new method to allow for the first direct measurement of the submarine melt rate of a tidewater glacier, and, in doing so, they concluded that current theoretical models may be underestimating glacial melt by up to two orders of magnitude.
How neuromuscular connections are maintained after nerve lesions
After nerve injury, the protein complex mTORC1 takes over an important function in skeletal muscle to maintain the neuromuscular junction, the synapse between the nerve and muscle fiber.
Rotavirus cell invasion triggers a cacophony of calcium signals
Time-lapsing imaging and other experimental approaches reveal that rotavirus induces hundreds of discrete and highly dynamic calcium spikes that increase during peak infection.
Make more with your 3D printers: from smooth surfaces to complex patterns
The production revolution envisioned by 3D printing visionaries is only a few steps away, when we will be able to print objects with whatever shape and properties we need.
Device could automatically deliver drug to reverse opioid overdose
Purdue University researchers are developing a device that would automatically detect opioid overdose and deliver naloxone, a drug known to reverse deadly effects.
Human artificial chromosomes bypass centromere roadblocks
Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) could be useful tools for both understanding how mammalian chromosomes function and creating synthetic biological systems, but for the last 20 years, they have been limited by an inefficient artificial centromere.
Interventions for type 2 diabetes successful across the genetic landscape
Researchers find the quality of dietary fat consumed and the genetic risk of diabetes work independently of each other, and that a diet rich in polyunsaturated fats can be safely applied across the spectrum of type 2 diabetes genetic risk.
Brains work in sync during music therapy -- study
For the first time researchers have been able to demonstrate that the brains of a patient and therapist become synchronised during a music therapy session, a breakthrough that could improve future interactions between patients and therapists.
Hidden genetic variations power evolutionary leaps
So-called 'cryptic' genetic variation plays an important role in evolution, despite having no immediate effect on the behavior or appearance of the organism.
Bacteria enhance coral resilience to climate change effects
An international group of researchers led by Professor Christian Voolstra, biologist at the University of Konstanz, investigated the interplay between corals and bacteria under changing environmental conditions.
A test of general relativity at the galaxy's center suggests Einstein's theory still holds
In a detailed study of a star orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy, researchers report that Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) accurately describes the behavior of light struggling to escape the gravity around this massive structure.
Shape shifting protocells hint at the mechanics of early life
Inspired by the processes of cellular differentiation observed in developmental biology, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Bristol have demonstrated a new spontaneous approach to building communities of cell-like entities (protocells) using chemical gradients.
The geoengineering of consent: How conspiracists dominate YouTube climate science content
Using YouTube to learn about climate-change-related topics will expose you to video content that mostly opposes worldwide scientific consensus.
New space discovery sheds light on how planets form
A newly-discovered planet orbiting one of the brightest young stars known could provide valuable information on how planetary bodies form.
Under development medical camera could help cut time and cost of procedures
Researchers have completed a successful clinical trial to detect and image radioactive tracers used in PET and in SPECT scans at the same time in a patient.
Researchers create model to predict risk of low blood sugar in people with diabetes
A new study by researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Merck identifies the risk factors that could help healthcare providers recognize patients being treated for diabetes who are most likely to have low blood sugar.
Tobacco industry has bumped up prices beyond that required by tax changes
The tobacco industry has bumped up the prices for its products beyond that required by tax changes, even when tax rises were large and unexpected, reveal the findings of research published online in the journal Tobacco Control.
Antibiotic-resistant genes found in London's canals and ponds
Central London's freshwater sources contain high levels of antibiotic-resistant genes, with the River Thames having the highest amount, according to research by UCL.
Muslim LGBTQI+ refugees more likely to gain asylum in Germany if they conform to stereotypes, study
LGBTQI+ Muslims seeking asylum are more successful if they speak, dress and act in accordance with Western notions of homosexuality, according to a new study.
The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Testosterone may significantly improve sexual function and sexual wellbeing in postmenopausal women
The most comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of testosterone treatment for women undertaken, including 46 reports on 36 trials involving 8,480 women, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal, suggests it can significantly improve sexual wellbeing for postmenopausal women.
How and why resistance training is imperative for older adults
A new position statement issued by a global expert panel, and supported by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, highlights the importance of resistance training for older adults to empower healthy aging.
World's smallest fossil monkey found in Amazon jungle
Some 18 million years ago, a tiny monkey weighing little more than a baseball lived in the Amazon rainforest, the smallest fossil monkey known worldwide.
Paris Agreement hampered by inconsistent pledges, new research finds
Some countries' Paris Climate Agreement pledges may not be as ambitious as they appear, a new study has found.
Group medical visit innovations improve access & advance integrative heath equity
Group medical visits are exceptional methods delivering critical components of integrative health care for treating and reducing the risk of a wide variety of chronic diseases, particularly in underserved populations.
Researchers call for industry regulation to stop 'photoshop' frenzy in advertising
In a newly published analysis of legal and regulatory strategies that may help combat rampant 'photoshopping' and the portrayal of unrealistic beauty standards in advertising, researchers from Harvard, Dickinson and Michigan State University College of Law are calling for industry regulation to curtail digital alteration of images in advertising.
Emergency medicine: Department-based intensive care unit improves patient survival rates
A new Michigan Medicine study found that implementing a dedicated emergency medicine department-based intensive care unit improved patient survival rates and lowered inpatient intensive care unit (ICU) admissions.
Science snapshots: Chromosomes, crystals, and drones
From Berkeley Lab: exploring human origins in the uncharted territory of our chromosomes; scientists grow spiraling new material; drones will fly for days with this new technology

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