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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | August 02, 2019


Researchers from the IDIBELL and the University of Barcelona describe a new treatment that could cope with 2 bone diseases
Researchers have found a possible treatment for 2 bone diseases that have actually no cure.
Researchers create first-ever 'map' of global labor flow
A new study from Indiana University reveals the ebb and flow of labor -- as well as industries and skills -- across the global economy using data on 130 million job transitions among 500 workers on the world's largest professional social network, LinkedIn.
Shining (star)light on the search for life
In the hunt for life on other worlds, astronomers scour over planets that are light-years away.
Eleven new species of rain frogs discovered in the tropical Andes
Eleven new frog species were described in the open-access journal ZooKeys.
Music was form of resistance for women during Civil Rights Movement
'Freedom songs' were key in giving motivation and comfort to those fighting for equal rights, in addition to helping empower Black women to lead others when formal leadership positions were unavailable.
Turning water into ice in the quantum realm
When you pop a tray of water into the freezer, you get ice cubes.
Discovery of non-blooming orchid on Japanese subtropical islands
A group of Japanese scientists has discovered a new orchid species on Japan's subtropical islands of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima that bears fruit without once opening its flowers.
Newly discovered Labrador fossils give clues about ancient climate
The discovery of fossilized plants in Labrador, Canada, by a team of McGill directed paleontologists provides the first quantitative estimate of the area's climate during the Cretaceous period, a time when the earth was dominated by dinosaurs.
Greening devastates the citrus industry -- new research offers a solution
Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as greening, is one of the most serious citrus plant diseases in the world.
Socially active 60-year-olds face lower dementia risk
Being more socially active in your 50s and 60s predicts a lower risk of developing dementia later on, finds a new UCL-led study published in PLOS Medicine.
Sesame allergy is more common than previously known
Sesame allergy affects more than 1 million children and adults in the US, more than previously known, reports a new study.
To learn how poison frogs are adapting to warmer temperatures, scientists got crafty
Strawberry poison frogs live in Costa Rican forests that are being cut down for farmland.
AI reveals new breast cancer types that respond differently to treatment
Scientists have used artificial intelligence to recognize patterns in breast cancer -- and uncovered five new types of the disease each matched to different personalized treatments.
Unexpected nut eating by gorillas
Scientists from the Max Planck institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Washington University in St.
Efficient, interconnected, stable: New carbon nanotubes to grow neurons
Carbon nanotubes able to take on the desired shapes thanks to a special chemical treatment, called crosslinking and, at the same time, able to function as substrata for the growth of nerve cells, finely tuning their growth and activity.
3D miniature livers lead the way to patient-specific drug discovery
Researchers from TMDU and CCHMC developed a reproducible method for creating multicellular miniature liver organoids from pluripotent stem cells.
New research shows effectiveness of laws for protecting imperiled species, remaining gaps
New research from the Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at Defenders of Wildlife, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows for the first time the importance of expert agencies to protecting imperiled species.
Research reveals bittersweet truth of how bee-friendly limonoids are made
Research by the John Innes Centre and Stanford University opens the door to azadirachtin production.
Mount Sinai researchers make immunotherapy work for treatment-resistant lymphoma
Mount Sinai researchers have developed a way to use immunotherapy drugs against treatment-resistant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas for the first time by combining them with stem cell transplantation, an approach that also dramatically increased the success of the drugs in melanoma and lung cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Discovery in July.
Shared E-scooters aren't always as green as other transport options
People think of electric scooters, or e-scooters, as environmentally friendly ways to get around town.
Study estimates frailty, prefrailty among older adults
This study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) combined the results of 46 observational studies involving nearly 121,000 nonfrail adults (60 or older from 28 countries) and estimated the rate of new cases of frailty and prefrailty, which is a high risk of progressing to frailty.
New research findings on dizziness of unknown cause
Many patients with functional dizziness look back on a long odyssey to numerous doctors, because no organic causes could be found.
US and China should collaborate, not compete, to bring AI to healthcare
In the wake of the US government ordering the Chinese artificial intelligence company, iCarbonX, to divest its majority ownership stake in the Cambridge, Mass.-based company PatientsLikeMe, Eric Topol, MD, of Scripps Research, has co-written a commentary arguing for more, not less, collaboration between China and the US on artificial intelligence (AI) development.
Change the bias, change the behavior? Maybe not
In a meta-analysis of published research, psychologist Calvin Lai of Washington University in St.
Finding new knowledge in history -- evaluating seven decades of ex situ seed regeneration
Publication of a comprehensive set of historical phenotypic data of wheat in Scientific Data.
Nordic researchers: A quarter of the world's population at risk of developing tuberculosis
A new study from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University, Denmark, has shown that probably 1 in 4 people in the world carry the tuberculosis bacterium in the body.
NASA sees tropical storm Flossie headed to central pacific ocean
Tropical Storm Flossie continues tracking in a westward direction through the Eastern Pacific Ocean and is expected to move into the Central Pacific Ocean later today, August 2, 2019.
Synthesizing single-crystalline hexagonal graphene quantum dots
A KAIST team has designed a novel strategy for synthesizing single-crystalline graphene quantum dots, which emit stable blue light.
How 'natural-killer' cells might help women avoid a deadly risk of childbirth
Malfunctioning uterine NK cells play a key role in placenta accreta, a condition that leads to over-attachment of the placenta to uterine tissues and can cause extensive bleeding during childbirth.
Surgery simulators are key to assessment of trainees
Machine learning-guided virtual reality simulators can help neurosurgeons develop the skills they need before they step in the operating room, according to a new study.
NASA satellite finds Tropical Storm Wipha blankets the Gulf of Tonkin
Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed the clouds from Tropical Storm Wipha blanketing the Gulf of Tonkin.
A wearable device so thin and soft you won't even notice it
Wearable human-machine interfaces have benefited from advances in electronics, materials and mechanical designs.
Study finds native bighorn sheep herds retain migratory diversity
A study led by Blake Lowrey found notable distinctions in the migrations of different types of bighorn sheep herds.
Agile untethered fully soft robots in liquid
To free the potential of soft robots in new applications, untethered design is of great importance but still challenging.
Model predicts cognitive decline due to Alzheimer's, up to two years out
An artificial intelligence model developed at MIT predicts cognitive decline of patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease by predicting their cognition test scores up to 2 years in the future.
Flu vaccine reduces risk of dying for elderly intensive care patients
An influenza vaccine does not just work when it comes to influenza.
NOAA finds Tropical Storm Erick's center with help of two NASA satellites
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed Tropical Storm Erick is being battered by wind shear, and that its strongest storms were south of the Big Island of Hawaii.
Genes that first enabled plants to grow leaves identified by scientists
The genes that first enabled plants to grow shoots and conquer the land have been identified by University of Bristol researchers.
Quantum entanglement in chemical reactions? Now there's a way to find out
For the first time, scientists have developed a practical way to measure quantum entanglement in chemical reactions.
When plant roots learned to follow gravity
Highly developed seed plants evolved deep root systems that are able to sense Earth's gravity.
Male black widows piggyback on work of rivals in a desperate attempt to find a mate
A new U of T study finds male black widow spiders will hijack silk trails left by rival males in their search for a potential mate.
Number of US fish stocks at sustainable levels remains near record high
Today, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released the Status of US Fisheries Annual Report to Congress, which details the status of 479 federally-managed stocks or stock complexes in the US to identify which stocks are subject to overfishing, are overfished, or are rebuilt to sustainable levels.
In medicine, young women continue to pay a higher price for family
Forty percent of female doctors in a new study stopped working or moved to working part time within a few years of finishing their medical training.
Manufacture of light-activated proteins
A new strategy for designing light-sensitive proteins has been developed by researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum.
Study finds genetic testing motivates behavior changes in families at risk for melanoma
A new study led by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) and collaborators at Northwestern University (NW) and Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) investigated whether genetic testing would motivate people at risk of developing melanoma to alter their behavior in order to reduce their risk.
Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators
Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals.
Making a case for returning airships to the skies
Reintroducing airships into the world's transportation-mix could contribute to lowering the transport sector's carbon emissions and can play a role in establishing a sustainable hydrogen based economy.
Paradoxical outcomes for Zika-exposed tots
Forty-five percent of Zika-exposed infants who had abnormalities at birth had normal test results in the second or third year of life.
Knowing where the center of a space is helps inform spatial awareness
As you enter a new environment such as visiting a classroom for the first time, your brain takes in information about your surroundings to help inform where you are and what direction you are facing.
New treatment option shown for heart failure fluid overload
UT Health San Antonio clinical researchers found that giving higher doses of the diuretic spironolactone could safely and effectively treat fluid excess in heart failure patients who did not respond to other diuretics.
Hepatitis B: Unusual virus discovered in shrews
The discovery of an unusual hepatitis B virus from shrews offers new opportunities of better understanding the chronic progression of the disease.
Participants at HKU conference call for attention to research quality
To explore the way to go and share best practices on research integrity, about 700 researchers, teachers, leaders of funding agencies, government officials, journal editors etc. from 60 countries gathered at the 6th World Conference on Research Integrity held at the University of Hong Kong between June 2 and 5, 2019.
Study identifies way to enhance the sustainability of manufactured soils
Through its FABsoil project, the University of Plymouth -- in partnership with the world famous Eden Project and businesses in Cornwall, such as the Green waste Company -- is leading the quest to fabricate soils which could ultimately lead to the creation of custom-made, sustainable products across a range of locations and markets.
NASA catches birth of Northwestern Pacific's Tropical Storm Francisco
Soon after Tropical Storm Francisco developed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
New wood membrane provides sustainable alternative for water filtration
Inspired by the intricate system of water circulating in a tree, a team of researchers led by Princeton University, have figured out how to use a thin slice of wood as a membrane through which water vapor can evaporate, leaving behind salt or other contaminants.
Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin
It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig.
Researchers remove the need for anti-rejection drugs in transplant recipients
For decades, immunologists have been trying to train the transplant recipient's immune system to accept transplanted cells and organs without the long-term use of anti-rejection drugs.
Study suggests economic growth benefits wildlife but growing human populations do not
Analysis shows that while national-level economic growth and social development -- including more women in government -- are associated with more abundant wildlife, growing human populations are linked to wildlife decline.
Technique uses magnets, light to control and reconfigure soft robots
Researchers have developed a technique that allows them to remotely control the movement of soft robots, lock them into position for as long as needed and later reconfigure the robots into new shapes.
Voters really want presidential candidates to talk more about science
A large majority of Iowans (74 percent) say it is important for the presidential candidates to talk about how science and scientific research will affect their policymaking decisions, but only 22 percent recall them discussing science issues during the past two months.
Prior Zika virus or dengue virus infection does not affect secondary infections in monkeys
Previous infection with either Zika virus or dengue virus has no apparent effect on the clinical course of subsequent infection with the other virus, according to a study published August 1 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by David O'Connor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and colleagues.
How common is sesame allergy?
This study used survey responses from nearly 79,000 individuals to estimate how common sesame allergy is in the United States.
A new lens for life-searching space telescopes
University of Arizona researchers have designed a new kind of telescope that is a cheaper, lighter and more powerful option than creating telescopes using ever-larger mirrors.
New stem cell combination could help to repair damaged hearts
A combination of heart cells derived from human stem cells could be the answer to developing a desperately-needed treatment for heart failure, according to new research part-funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Nature Biotechnology.
Water treatment cuts parasitic roundworm infections affecting 800 million people
A two-year study in rural Kenya explored the effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing and nutritional interventions on rates of intestinal worm and Giardia infections.
Seabirds are threatened by hazardous chemicals in plastics
An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that hazardous chemicals were detected in plastics eaten by seabirds.
Machine learning helps predict if storms will cause blackouts
Summer thunderstorms that knock out power grids are common around the world, and can be a problem in Finland.
Frailty is a medical condition, not an inevitable result of aging
A landmark study published today, led by researchers at Monash University in Australia, explored the incidence of frailty in 120,000 people over the age of 60 in 28 countries.
Reverse engineering the fireworks of life
An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching.
Mayo Clinic study shows AI could enable accurate screening for atrial fibrillation
A new Mayo Clinic research study shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can detect the signs of an irregular heart rhythm -- atrial fibrillation (AF) -- in an electrocardiogram (EKG), even if the heart is in normal rhythm at the time of a test.

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