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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | August 08, 2019


Persistent plume
Thunderstorms generated by a group of giant wildfires in 2017 injected a small volcano's worth of aerosol into the stratosphere, creating a smoke plume that lasted for almost nine months.
Restructuring Medicare Shared Savings Program can yield 40% savings in health costs
More than a trillion dollars was spent on healthcare in the United States in 2018, with Medicare and Medicaid accounting for some 37% of those expenditures.
Bacteria on tumors influences immune response and survival of patients with pancreatic cancer
MD Anderson researchers find tumor microbiome influences immune response and patient survival in pancreatic cancer.
Building the future of federal science
The work of federal scientists is essential to support the health, security, and well-being of people in Canada, from exploring the high Arctic, to safeguarding the effective and ethical use of AI, to ensuring the food that ends up on our dinner plates is safe to eat.
Hubble's new portrait of Jupiter
This new Hubble Space Telescope view of Jupiter, taken on June 27, 2019, reveals the giant planet's trademark Great Red Spot, and a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years.
Using lasers to visualize molecular mysteries in our atmosphere
Molecular interactions between gases and liquids underpin much of our lives, but difficulties in measuring gas-liquid collisions have so far prevented the fundamental exploration of these processes.
New perovskite material shows early promise as an alternative to silicon
CsPbI3 is an inorganic perovskite, a group of materials gaining popularity in the solar world due to their high efficiency and low cost.
Human microbiome churns out thousands of tiny novel proteins, Stanford researchers find
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered that the human microbiome is churning out tens of thousands of proteins so small that they've gone unnoticed in previous studies.
Studies of fungi provide new knowledge of harmful mutations in cells
Long-lived mushrooms that grow in 'fairy rings' accumulate surprisingly few mutations over time.
Brain researchers invent an affordable smartphone measurement for testing of medications
Brain researchers from the University of Copenhagen have invented an inexpensive method to measure tremor as known from Parkinson's disease in mice.
BrainHealth researchers study the neurochemistry of social perception
Cues signaling trust and dominance are crucial for social life.
Two-in-one contrast agent for medical imaging
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) visualizes internal body structures, often with the help of contrast agents to enhance sensitivity.
Scientists uncover the intricacies of the 'on/off switch' that creates cell differentiation
A team of biologists has discovered how cells become different from each other during embryogenesis, a finding that offers new insights into genetic activity and has implications for better understanding the onset of disease and birth defects.
Hubble showcases new portrait of Jupiter
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals the intricate, detailed beauty of Jupiter's clouds in this new image taken on June 27, 2019.
Study furthers radically new view of gene control
Researchers have discovered physical interactions between proteins and DNA that help explain why specialized droplets called condensates, which contain the machinery needed to copy DNA into RNA, tend to cluster at genomic regions that are particularly active in a given cell.
Pancreatic cancer: Less toxic, more enduring drug may improve therapy
A new drug that penetrates the protective barrier around pancreatic cancers and accumulates in malignant cells may improve current chemotherapy, a study in mice suggests.
Can eating poop save you from this deadly bacteria? (video)
Every year around half a million people in the United States get sick from the bacterium C. diff, often after taking antibiotics.
Control theory: Mother nature is an engineer
In the last 150 years, engineers have developed and mastered ways to stabilize dynamic systems, without lag or overshoot, using what's known as control theory.
NASA's MMS finds its first interplanetary shock
NASA's MMS mission just made the first high-resolution measurements of an interplanetary shockwave launched from the sun.
Novel strategy uncovers potential to control widespread soilborne pathogens
This study introduces a new strategy for identifying antagonistic bacteria, which can then be used to control important plant pathogens.
Why does El Niño decay faster than La Niña?
Generally, El Niño tends to turn into a La Niña event in the following June-July after its mature phase; however, the negative sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTAs) associated with La Niña events can persist for more than one year after peaking, resulting in a longer duration than that of El Niño.
Using recent gene flow to define microbe populations
Identifying species among plants and animals has been a full-time occupation for some biologists, but the task is even more daunting for the myriad microbes that inhabit the planet.
Graphite intercalation compounds may offer keys to prolonging battery life
Graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) are formed by insertion of certain atomic and molecular species between the graphene layers of graphite.
Mega-cloud from Canadian wildfires will help model impacts of nuclear war
Extreme wildfires in British Columbia, Canada, pumped so much smoke into the upper atmosphere in August 2017 that an enormous cloud circled most of the Northern Hemisphere -- a finding in the journal Science that will help scientists model the climate impacts of nuclear war.
These sharks use unique molecules to glow green
In the depths of the sea, certain shark species transform the ocean's blue light into a bright green color that only other sharks can see -- but how they biofluoresce has previously been unclear.
Is giant cell arteritis associated with race?
Giant cell arteritis is an inflammation of the blood vessels that typically occurs in adults over 50 and, if left untreated, can result in irreversible vision loss and death.
The world's smallest stent
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a new method for producing malleable microstructures -- for instance, vascular stents that are 40 times smaller than previously possible.
Many risk factors contribute to worsening of quality of life in people with knee OA
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that the health-related quality of life of most people who have or have a higher risk of knee osteoarthritis remained unchanged over an eight-year trajectory.
Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?
'Hydrostatic legless jumping' launches a 3-millimeter maggot of a goldenrod gall midge 20-30 body-lengths away with acceleration rivalling the best legged leapers.
The Lancet Global Health: Automatically chlorinating water at public taps cuts child diarrhea by almost a quarter in urban Bangladesh
A novel water treatment device that delivers chlorine automatically via public taps without the need for electricity, reduced child diarrhea by 23% compared with controls (156 cases out of 2,073 child measurements [7.5%] vs 216/2,145 [10%]) over 14 months in two urban neighborhoods of Bangladesh, according to a randomized trial following more than 1,000 children published in The Lancet Global Health journal.
Study shows gun shops can aid in preventing suicides
Firearm retailers throughout Washington are willing to learn about suicide prevention but are reluctant to talk to customers about mental health issues, according to a new study by Forefront Suicide Prevention at the University of Washington.
UBC-developed sensor provides next-generation ice detection
A new sensor, that can detect ice accumulation in real-time, might be a game-changer when it comes to airline safety and efficiency.
Researchers identify a possible therapeutic target for Kennedy's disease and prostate cancer
A study led by scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and published in Nature Communications proposes chaperone protein Hps70 as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of Kennedy's disease -- a rare neuromuscular condition -- and of castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Fluoride may diminish kidney and liver function in adolescents, study suggests
luoride exposure may lead to a reduction in kidney and liver function among adolescents, according to a study published by Mount Sinai researchers in Environment International in August.
Rethinking seizures associated with cardiac disease
Research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that mutations of a gene implicated in long QT syndrome in humans may trigger seizures because of their direct effects on certain classes of neurons in the brain -- independent from what the genetic mutations do to heart function.
Does cable news shape your views?
A new study led by MIT political scientists finds that while partisan media does indeed have 'a strong persuasive impact' on political attitudes, news media exposure has a bigger impact on people without strongly held preferences for partisan media than it does for people who seek out partisan media outlets.
Study finds changes in mindset key to helping college students exercise more
According to the survey, respondents indicated that sustaining the weekly 150 minutes of exercise would require the support of family and friends, as well as an emotional shift, in which students would use exercise as an outlet for stressors.
Lassa virus' soft spot revealed
A new study identified and then reverse engineered the molecular properties shared by antibodies that are particularly efficient at inactivating or 'neutralizing' Lassa virus.
Nanovectors could improve the combined administration of antimalarial drugs
According to the study, the strategy has the added advantage of targeting the transmissible phase of the parasite -- the gametocyte.
Data analysis tool to help scientists make sense of mouse's calls
Technology that can help interpret inaudible calls from laboratory mice has been developed in a bid to improve research.
Promising clinical trial results for drug for rare disease in which patients can't eat fat
In a Phase III clinical trial, the drug volanesorsen significantly reduced blood fat (triglyceride) levels in participants with a rare disease called familial chylomicronemia syndrome; finding could also help inform better prevention methods and treatments for many types of heart disease.
Ethiopian rock shelter earliest evidence of high-altitude prehistoric life
Archaeologists have uncovered the earliest evidence of high-altitude prehistoric living in the form of a rock shelter in Ethiopia, though whether the site was inhabited permanently is unclear.
Pupillary response to glare illusions of different colors
Toyohashi University of Technology researchers in cooperation with researchers at the University of Oslo measured people's perceived brightness and pupillary response after viewing glare illusions presented in a variety of different colors.
Controlling the shape-shifting skeletons of cells
In studying the dynamic skeletons that cells use to move, Caltech researchers develop a new tool for manipulating chemistry and biology.
Blood clotting factors may help fight multi-drug resistant superbugs
Coagulation factors, which are involved in blood clotting after injury, may offer new strategies for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria, according to a study published in Cell Research.
FutureNeuro researchers integrate genomics data in to electronic patient records
Researchers from the HSE Epilepsy Lighthouse Project and FutureNeuro, the SFI Research Centre for Chronic and Rare Neurological Diseases hosted by RCSI, have developed a new genomics module in the Irish National Epilepsy Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system.
Despite habitat protection, endangered owls decline in Mount Rainier National Park
When the Northern Spotted Owl was protected under the Endangered Species Act in 1990, the primary threat to the species was the loss of old-growth forest.
Thermally stable TB vaccine closer to reality thanks to microscopic silica cages
A new method prevents crucial vaccine components from spoiling outside of a fridge -- meaning a thermally stable vaccine that can be reliably delivered to remote areas around the world is more likely.
Researchers identify type of parasitic bacteria that saps corals of energy
Researchers at Oregon State University have proposed a new genus of bacteria that flourishes when coral reefs become polluted, siphoning energy from the corals and making them more susceptible to disease.
Over a century of Arctic sea ice volume reconstructed with help from historic ships' logs
A new study provides a 110-year record of the total volume of Arctic sea ice, using early US ships' voyages to verify the earlier part of the record.
New process discovered to completely degrade flame retardant in the environment
A team of environmental scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and China has for the first time used a dynamic, two-step process to completely degrade a common flame-retardant chemical, rendering the persistent global pollutant nontoxic.
Neural networks will help manufacture carbon nanotubes
A team of scientists from Skoltech's Laboratory of Nanomaterials proposed a neural-network-based method for monitoring the growth of carbon nanotubes, preparing the ground for a new generation of sophisticated electronic devices.
Rapid coral death and decay, not just bleaching, as marine heatwaves intensify
When ocean temperatures rise, corals are put at risk of a phenomenon known as bleaching, in which corals expel the algae living in their tissues and turn white.
Reevaluating the impacts of smoke plumes aloft, based on the 2017 Pacific Northwest wildfires
Extensive wildfires in the Pacific Northwest in the summer of 2017 unleashed a vast plume of smoke that ascended high into the stratosphere, persisted for more than eight months and provided researchers a rare opportunity to evaluate current models of smoke ascent.
Researchers discover oldest fossil forest in Asia
The Devonian period (419 million to 359 million years ago), called the 'age of the fishes,' saw significant evolutionary progress in plants.
When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price
Jacob Barney, associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences' School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, graduate researcher Becky Fletcher, and a team of five other doctoral students conducted the first-ever comprehensive meta-analytic review examining the ecological impacts of invasive plants by exploring how animals -- indigenous and exotic -- respond to these nonnative plants.
Analysis and detoxification in one step
Many industrial and agriculture processes use chemicals that can be harmful for workers and the ecosystems where they accumulate.
GW researchers identify barriers to fungal infection diagnosis
A new survey from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, identifies several barriers that prevent the consistent use of fungal diagnostic preparations to correctly identify cutaneous fungal infections.
The reasons behind aerosol pollution over the eastern slope of the Tibetan Plateau
The aerosol optical depth over the eastern slope of the Tibetan Plateau (ESTP) is extremely large -- and even more so than some important industrialized regions and deserts, which is the result of a combination of human activities and natural conditions.
Puzzling shapes: Unlocking the mysteries of plant cell morphology
The discovery of the mechanics and molecular mechanism that dictate cell shape formation in plants by a team of McGill researchers offers new clues about the fundamental processes governing tissue formation in multicellular organisms.
Reducing exposure to opioids after cesarean delivery
An effort to improve the scheduled cesarean section delivery experience found that changes to preoperative and postoperative processes can lead to reductions in opioid use without increased pain and with faster recovery, according to research from Kaiser Permanente published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.
Six in 10 children receive opioids after tonsillectomy
Sixty percent of privately insured children undergoing tonsil removal received opioids -- with average prescriptions lasting about six to 10 days -- a new study finds.
Opioid prescribing patterns in children after tonsillectomy
National private insurance claims data were used to examine opioid prescribing patterns in children after tonsillectomy and return visits for complications.
Installing solar panels on agricultural lands maximizes their efficiency, new study shows
A new study finds that if less than 1% of agricultural land was converted to solar panels, it would be sufficient to fulfill global electric energy demand.
Explaining why TP53 is commonly mutated in human cancer, and the effects of its mutation
A comprehensive functional analysis of TP53 mutations in human leukemia may refute a working hypothesis -- primarily based on mouse studies -- that missense mutations confer new cancer-causing functions to the p53 tumor suppressor protein; the new study instead suggests that these mutations exert a 'dominant-negative' effect that reduces the cancer-suppressing activity of wild-type p53, the authors say.
Depression is the single largest predictor of substance use during pregnancy
Researchers studied health and geographical data from 25,000 pregnant women in Southwestern Ontario, Canada, and have shown that depression is the largest driver of substance use during pregnancy.
Genetic variation contributes to individual differences in pleasure
Differences in how our brains respond when we're anticipating a financial reward are due, in part, to genetic differences, according to research with identical and fraternal twins published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
A new pathway: researchers identify potential treatment target for Crohn's disease
Crohn's disease is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in which the body's own immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, and treatment is focused on controlling the symptoms of the disease in its acute phase and managing it in remission.
Protein factors increasing yield of a biofuel precursor in microscopic algae
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kyoto University, Kazusa DNA Research Institute, and Tohoku University have identified a protein, Lipid Remodeling reguLator 1 (LRL1), in microscopic algae that is involved in the production of triacylglycerol, a biofuel precursor.
New study in Science: Why humans in Africa fled to the mountains during the last ice age
People in Ethiopia did not live in low valleys during the last ice age.
Forget 'Obamageddon', 'prepping' is now part of mainstream US politics and culture
Criminologist Dr. Michael Mills challenges the traditional view that US 'preppers' are motivated by extreme right-wing or apocalyptic views.
Having a parent, sibling, or child with blood cancer increases one's own risk
New data suggest that people who have a parent, sibling, or child with blood cancer have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with the disease.
Tel Aviv U and Technion researchers wrest control of one of world's most secure PLCs
Cybersecurity researchers at Tel Aviv University and the Technion Institute of Technology have discovered critical vulnerabilities in the Siemens S7 Simatic programmable logic controller (PLC), one of the world's most secure PLCs, which are used to run industrial processes.
Oil rigs could pump CO2 emissions into rocks beneath North Sea
North Sea oil and gas rigs could be modified to pump vast quantities of carbon dioxide emissions into rocks below the seabed, research shows.
1-2 caffeinated drinks not linked with higher risk of migraines; 3+ may trigger them
In a study published in the American Journal of Medicine, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard T.H.
Gene protective against fruit fly heat-induced seizures may explain some human seizures
Researchers identified a gene in fruit flies that helps prevent the hyperexcitability of specific neurons that trigger seizures.
Great Scots! 'It's' a unique linguistic phenomenon
A new study reveals that in a number of varieties of English spoken in Scotland, the rules of contraction (it's for it is) seem to differ unexpectedly, and asserts that such differences may shed new light on our understanding of language.
Ten years of icy data show the flow of heat from the Arctic seafloor
In addition to 10 years of data on the flow of heat in the Arctic ocean seafloor, the USGS and Geological Survey of Canada have published an analysis of that data using modern seismic data.
Tobacco plant 'stickiness' aids helpful insects, plant health
Researchers show beneficial relationship between 'sticky' tobacco plants and helpful insects that consume tobacco pests.
Electromagnetic fields may hinder spread of breast cancer cells
Electromagnetic fields might help prevent some breast cancers from spreading to other parts of the body, new research has found.
Teens feel pressured to get pregnant
Female adolescents are experiencing relationship abuse at alarming rates, according to a new Michigan State University study that specifically researched reproductive coercion -- a form of abuse in which a woman is pressured to become pregnant against her wishes.
Balance of 'stop' and 'go' signaling could be key to cancer immunotherapy response
A crucial signaling pathway that can tell the immune system to fight off cancer can also be co-opted by cancer cells to put the brakes on the immune system.
Ezetimibe reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes
Given in addition to statin therapy, ezetimibe has a preventive effect in patients with CHD and acute coronary syndrome.
Too much coffee raises the odds of triggering a migraine headache
Drinking three or more servings of caffeinated beverages a day is associated with the onset of a headache on that or the following day in patients with episodic migraine, according to a new study in The American Journal of Medicine, published by Elsevier.
Researchers discover why intense light can protect cardiovascular health
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that intense light amplifies a specific gene that bolsters blood vessels and offers protection against heart attacks.
Insights on timing of Huntington's disease onset
New research results published in the journal Cell, call into question an accepted theory about the timing of HD onset.
Biomarker to avoid safety risk for the sleep deprived
New research published today in the The Journal of Physiology shows that a range of eye-movement tests provide a reliable biomarker of individual acute sleep loss.
Bringing cancer medication safely to its destination
Treating cancer more selectively and more effectively -- this could be achieved with an innovative technology developed by teams of researchers at the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU).
Blood signature for β-cell autoimmunity -- potential tool for disease prevention
Using cutting-edge genomics methods a gene signature predicting type 1 diabetes was discovered.
Existing anti-parasitic drug could offer treatment for Ebola
Amid the worsening Ebola outbreak in the Congo, now threatening to spill into Rwanda, a new study suggests that an existing, FDA-approved drug called nitazoxanide could potentially help contain this deadly, highly contagious infection.
Back-to-back low snow years will become more common, study projects
Consecutive low snow years may become six times more common across the Western United States over the latter half of this century, leading to ecological and economic challenges such as expanded fire seasons and poor snow conditions at ski resorts, according to a new study.
Implantable 3D blastocyst-like embryonic structure generated from mouse stem cells
An international collaboration of researchers from the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan and the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease in the USA have generated 3D blastocyst-like structures from stem cells.
Live mitochondria seen in unprecedented detail: Photobleaching in STED microscopy overcome
A research team led by Nagoya University has created a fluorescent marker molecule that does not degrade under a STED microscope: the photobleaching problem has been solved.
Fungi living in cattail roots could improve our picture of ancient ecoystems
Some fossil plants that lived in wetlands had fungi living in their roots, and others don't.
This designer clothing lets users turn on electronics while turning away bacteria
Purdue University researchers have developed a new fabric innovation that allows the wearer to control electronic devices through the clothing.
Cancer survivors in high deductible health plans more likely to have delayed care
A new study from American Cancer Society investigators finds cancer survivors in high deductible health plans were more likely to report delaying or foregoing care.
The MIT Press releases a major report on all available open-source publishing software
The MIT Press is pleased to release Mind the Gap (openly published at mindthegap.pubpub.org), a major report on the current state of all available open-source software for publishing.
Typhoon Krosa follows leader Supertyphoon Lekima
NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image using NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Worldview application on Aug.
Moffitt researchers identify subtypes of squamous cell lung cancer
Despite improved knowledge of the molecular alterations in SCC, little is understood about how the alterations contribute to the development of the cancer and how potential vulnerabilities could be exploited to treat the disease.
Pairing prediction and production in AI-informed robotic flow synthesis
Combining machine learning and robotic precision, researchers present an integrated strategy for computer-augmented chemical synthesis, one that successfully yielded 15 different medicinally related small molecules, they say.
Alternatives to burning can increase Indian farmers' profits and cut pollution
A new study published in Science shows that farmers in northern India could increase their profits if they stop burning their rice straw and adopt no-till practices to grow wheat.
Fighting child diarrhea
An automatic chlorine dispenser installed at shared community water points reduces rates of diarrhea in children.
World's largest frogs build their own ponds for their young
The first example of 'nest'-building in an African amphibian, the Goliath frog, has been described in a new article in the Journal of Natural History, and could explain why they have grown to be giant.
Migration can promote or inhibit cooperation between individuals
A new mathematical analysis suggests that migration can generate patterns in the spatial distribution of individuals that promote cooperation and allow populations to thrive, in spite of the threat of exploitation.
How cigarette smoke makes head and neck cancer more aggressive
A change in the tumor metabolism due to tobacco exposure could open new treatment avenues in head and neck cancer.
Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife
Researchers conducted camera trap surveys within Sumatra's Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park and five surrounding remnant forest fragments, finding 28 mammal species in the protected forest and 21 in the fragments -- including critically endangered species such as Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) and Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), along with species of conservation concern such as marbled cat (Pardofelis marmorata) and Asiatic golden cat (Pardofelis temminckii).
88% decline of big freshwater animals
Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: from 1970 to 2012, global populations of freshwater megafauna declined by 88% -- twice the loss of vertebrate populations on land or in the ocean.
Scientists make major breakthrough in understanding common eye disease
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin today announced a major breakthrough with important implications for sufferers of a common eye disease -- dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) -- which can cause total blindness in sufferers, and for which there are currently no approved therapies.
Adding MS drug to targeted cancer therapy may improve glioblastoma outcomes
The multiple sclerosis drug teriflunomide, paired with targeted cancer therapy, markedly shrinks patient-derived glioblastomas grown in mice by reaching stem cells at the tumor's root, according to a new UC San Diego School of Medicine study published in Science Translational Medicine.
Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate
Earlham Institute (EI), with the University of East Anglia (UEA), have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees.
New design strategy brightens up the future of perovskite-based light-emitting diodes
Scientists at Tokyo Tech discover a new strategy to design incredibly efficient perovskite-based LEDs with record-setting brightness by leveraging the quantum confinement effect.
High-energy lasers could be used to treat Alzheimer's disease in the future
The aggregation of amyloid protein fibrils is involved in diseases such as amyloidosis and even Alzheimer's.
Lancaster University program brings clarity to hard-to-decipher company annual reports
New software from Lancaster University cuts through hard-to-understand financial reports, to help investors and regulators.
Stony corals: Limits of adaption
Corals have been dominant framework builders of reef structures for millions of years.
A key piece to understanding how quantum gravity affects low-energy physics
In a new study, led by researchers from SISSA (Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati), the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Waterloo, a solid theoretical framework is provided to discuss modifications to the Unruh effect caused by the microstructure of space-time.
Lekima becomes supertyphoon, heading towards Eastern China
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Supertyphoon Lekima as it tracked 214 nautical miles southwest of Okinawa, Japan.  Tropical cyclone warning signal No.
Fewer cows, more trees and bioenergy
Combatting global warming will require major changes in land use, a new climate change report says.
Marine heatwaves a bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, scientists find
Marine heatwaves are a much bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, research revealing a previously unrecognized impact of climate change on coral reefs has shown.
One cell at a time, researchers create a blueprint of liver cells in health and disease
In every tissue throughout our bodies, various cell types are communicating and coordinating their efforts to perform vital functions and maintain health.
Decoding touch
Study in mice reveals several distinct molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal touch sensitivity in autism spectrum disorders.

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