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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | August 09, 2019


Chicago water pollution may be keeping invasive silver carp out of Great Lakes, study says
Invasive silver carp have been moving north toward the Great Lakes since their accidental release in the 1970s.
Ultracold quantum particles break classical symmetry
Many phenomena of the natural world evidence symmetries in their dynamic evolution which help researchers to better understand a system's inner mechanism.
NASA's Aqua Satellite finds a large ragged eye in Typhoon Krosa
Typhoon Krosa is a large storm moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that the large typhoon also has a large eye.
New diagnostic method for fungal infections could combat a major global health risk
A new study from The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) has demonstrated how dual DNA barcoding could help improve the diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases, giving patients access to potentially life-saving treatment much sooner.
Novel dual stem cell therapy improving cardiac regeneration
As a medical emergency caused by severe cardiovascular diseases, myocardial infarction (MI) can inflict permanent and life-threatening damage to the heart.
Employees less upset at being replaced by robots than by other people
Generally speaking, most people find the idea of workers being replaced by robots or software worse than if the jobs are taken over by other workers.
Mathematicians of TU Dresden develop new statistical indicator
Up to now, it has taken a great deal of computational effort to detect dependencies between more than two high-dimensional variables, in particular when complicated non-linear relationships are involved.
Research on cholera adds to understanding of the social life of bacteria
Strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae transform themselves from small, comma-shaped cells to long filaments in nutrient-poor environments to aid short-term survival.
Microneedling improves appearance of acne scars
It turns out creating tiny injuries on your face with needles actually helps decrease the appearance of acne scars.
Health effects of eating marijuana is subject of a new study
Researchers have conducted a study in which mice voluntarily ate a dough containing THC, the primary psychoactive component in marijuana.
Bone strength could be linked to when you reached puberty
A new study from the University of Bristol has linked bone strength to the timing of puberty.
Enhanced natural gas storage to help reduce global warming
Researchers have designed plastic-based materials that can store natural gas more effectively.
Manipulating dose, timing of two therapies reduces relapse in mouse models of breast cancer
Changing the standard dose and timing of two therapies greatly cut tumor relapse and reduced side effects in mouse models of kinase mutated breast cancer and lung cancer, UT Southwestern Simmons Cancer Center researchers have found.
Virtual 'universe machine' sheds light on galaxy evolution
By creating millions of virtual universes and comparing them to observations of actual galaxies, a University of Arizona-led research team has made discoveries that present a powerful new approach for studying galaxy formation.
Abundant screen time linked with overweight among children
A recently completed study indicates that Finnish children who spend a lot of time in front of screens have a heightened risk for overweight and abdominal obesity, regardless of the extent of their physical activity.
The brain inspires a new type of artificial intelligence
Using advanced experiments on neuronal cultures and large scale simulations, scientists at Bar-Ilan University have demonstrated a new type of ultrafast artifical intelligence algorithms -- based on the very slow brain dynamics -- which outperform learning rates achieved to date by state-of-the-art learning algorithms.
Analysis of medical aid in dying in Oregon, Washington
An examination of a combined 28 years of data finds similarities in the characteristics and illnesses of patients requesting medical aid in dying in Oregon and Washington.
Despite temperature shifts, treehoppers manage to mate
A rare bright spot among dismal climate change predictions, new research findings show that some singing insects are likely to manage to reproduce even in the midst of potentially disruptive temperature changes.
Cyborg organoids offer rare view into early stages of development
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have grown simplified organs known as organoids with fully integrated sensors.
Smuggling route for cells protects DNA from parasites
An international research team has now uncovered new insight into how safety mechanisms keep genetic parasites in check so that they do not damage the genome.
A Finnish study finds bowel preparation for colon surgery unnecessary
As indicated by a recently completed Finnish study, antibiotics administration and bowel cleansing before colon surgery do not improve patients' treatment outcomes.
Better tools, better cancer immunotherapy
Researchers from DTU have developed an important new tool towards producing therapies for cancer patients using the patient's own cells.
Conservative treatment with a sling can replace surgery for shoulder fractures
An arm in a sling cures a shoulder fracture just as well as an operation with plates and screws.
Medical research ranked higher by people receiving health-related news while they wait
Could large TV monitors in waiting rooms, informing visitors about current local medical research, be a good idea?
Making sense of remote sensing data
The use of remote sensing equipment for data collection has revolutionized biological data collection in the field, but researchers still need tools to help analyze the data.
Scientists can now control thermal profiles at the nanoscale
Scientists have designed and tested an experimental system that uses a near-infrared laser to actively heat two gold nanorod antennae to different temperatures.
Turbulence meets a shock
Interaction of shocks and turbulence investigated with a focus on high intensity turbulence levels.
Comparison between major types of arthritis based on diagnostic ultrasonography
Ultrasound is a non-invasive and relatively inexpensive means of diagnosing a number of medical conditions.
Green turtles eat plastic that looks like their food
Green turtles are more likely to swallow plastic that resembles their natural diet of sea grass, new research suggests.
Nanoparticles' movements reveal whether they can successfully target cancer
A Northwestern University research team has developed a new way to determine whether or not single drug-delivery nanoparticles will successfully hit their intended targets -- by simply analyzing each nanoparticle's distinct movements in real time.
Development of simplified new mass spectrometric technique using laser and graphene
DGIST Research Fellow Jae Young Kim and Chair-professor Dae Won Moon's team developed a mass spectrometric technology using graphene substrate and continuous wave laser without complex sample preparation.
Rice chemists show it's hip to be square
Rice University chemists found a simple route to synthesize azetidines, precursors that make it easier for drug designers to access nitrogen atoms that are key to building new compounds.
NASA gives Typhoon Lekima a twice-over with the Aqua satellite
NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared and visible views of Typhoon Lekima as it was approaching landfall in China.
Bending the rules: A revolutionary new way for metals to be malleable
For nearly 100 years, scientists thought they understood everything there was to know about how metals bend.
Extreme heat associated with increased risk of hospitalization, death for patients with ESRD
This observational study looked at whether extreme heat is associated with increased risk of hospitalization or death among the vulnerable population of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Older adults more likely to condemn even accidental harm
As people get older, they are more likely to condemn and want to punish others for acts that cause harm, even if no harm was intended, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.
Single-cell sequencing reveals glioblastoma's shape-shifting nature
Glioblastoma, a cancer that arises in the brain's supporting glial cells, is one of the worst diagnoses a child can receive.
Regular exercise may slow decline in those at risk of Alzheimer's
Moderate exercise is not only good for memory as people age, it also appears to help prevent the development of physical signs of Alzheimer's, known as biomarkers, in those who are at risk for the disease, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.
Take a break! Brain stimulation improves motor learning
In a joint study, Jost-Julian Rumpf from the University of Leipzig and Gesa Hartwigsen from MPI CBS suggest the process of motor learning probably already begins during short interruptions of practice.
Direct toxic action of beta-amyloid identified
Hyperactive neurons in specific areas of the brain are believed to be an early perturbation in Alzheimer's disease.
Depression symptoms in Alzheimer's could be signs for cognitive decline
Depression symptoms in cognitively healthy older individuals together with brain amyloid, a biological marker of Alzheimer's could trigger changes in memory and thinking over time.
A genetic chaperone for healthy aging?
Researchers at the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) have identified an epigenetic mechanism that appears to strongly influence healthy aging.
Sleep, snacks and shift work
If you're one of Australia's 1.4 million shiftworkers, eating at irregular times is just par for the course -- but have you ever stopped to think about the impact this might have on your body?
New retroreflective material could be used in nighttime color-changing road signs
A thin film that reflects light in intriguing ways could be used to make road signs that shine brightly and change color at night.
When working with animals can hurt your mental health
While it might sound like fun to work around pets every day, veterinarians and people who volunteer at animal shelters face particular stressors that can place them at risk for depression, anxiety and even suicide, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.
Printing flattens polymers, improving electrical and optical properties
Researchers have found a way to use polymer printing to stretch and flatten twisted molecules so that they conduct electricity better.
There are no water molecules between the ions in the selectivity filter of potassium
Do only potassium ions pass through the selectivity filter of a potassium channel, or are there water molecules between the ions?
A new method of tooth repair? Scientists uncover mechanisms to inform future treatment
This is a peer-reviewed, observational study conducted in mice. Stem cells hold the key to wound healing, as they develop into specialized cell types throughout the body -- including in teeth.
Oral appliances may be highly effective in treating a type of sleep apnea
Certain traits may define a type of obstructive sleep apnea that can be effectively treated with an oral appliance, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
Study shows we like our math like we like our art: Beautiful
A beautiful landscape painting, a beautiful piano sonata -- art and music are almost exclusively described in terms of aesthetics, but what about math?
Women gain more political and economic power, but gender gap persists
There remains a persistent gender gap in attitudes about equality between men and women, suggests a University of California, Davis, study.
Enhancing the quality of AI requires moving beyond the quantitative
Artificial Intelligence engineers should enlist ideas and expertise from a broad range of social science disciplines, including those embracing qualitative methods, in order to reduce the potential harm of their creations and to better serve society as a whole, a pair of researchers has concluded.
Artificial intelligence could yield more accurate breast cancer diagnoses
UCLA researchers have developed an artificial intelligence system that could help pathologists read biopsies more accurately and to better detect and diagnose breast cancer.
These sharks glow in the dark thanks to a newly identified kind of marine biofluorescence
In a study publishing Aug. 8, 2019 in the journal iScience, researchers have identified what's responsible for the sharks' bright green hue: a previously unknown family of small-molecule metabolites.
Scientists at DGIST discovered how chronic stress causes brain damage
Chronic stress induces autophagic death of adult hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs).
New method of tooth repair? Scientists uncover mechanisms that could help dental treatment
Stem cells hold the key for tissue engineering, as they develop into specialised cell types throughout the body including in teeth.
The mind-muscle connection: For aesthetes, not athletes?
The 'mind-muscle connection.' Ancient lore for bodybuilders, latest buzz for Instragram fitness followers.
Disrupted genetic clocks in schizophrenia-affected brains reveal clues to the disease
Researchers studying schizophrenia-affected brains have discovered that the daily timing of gene expression is highly disrupted in the region responsible for cognition and memory.
Mental health specialists boost vets' access to outpatient services
A Veterans Health Administration program that added mental health specialists, care managers or both in primary care clinics significantly improved access to mental health and primary care services to veterans with behavioral health needs.
Study proves hepatitis C drugs reduce liver-related deaths by nearly half
A new study from the UT Southwestern Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center demonstrates that antiviral drugs for hepatitis C reduce liver-related deaths by nearly 50% in patients with a history of liver cancer.

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