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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 04, 2019


Earthquake symmetry
A recent study investigated around 100,000 localized seismic events to search for patterns in the data.
Prehistoric AC
Tyrannosaurus rex, one of the largest meat-eating dinosaurs on the planet, had an air conditioner in its head, suggest scientists from the University of Missouri, Ohio University and University of Florida, while challenging over a century of previous beliefs.
Can AI spot liars?
Though algorithms are increasingly being deployed in all facets of life, a new USC study has found that they fail basic tests as truth detectors.
MD Anderson study confirms protein as potential cause of most common type of pancreatic cancer
An oncogene, UPS21, has been confirmed as a frequently amplified gene in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the most common and often lethal form of pancreatic cancer.
Depression breakthrough
Major depressive disorder -- referred to colloquially as the 'black dog' -- has been identified as a genetic cause for 20 distinct diseases, providing vital information to help detect and manage high rates of physical illnesses in people diagnosed with depression.
Georgetown tobacco control expert outlines motivations of Altria-Juul deal
The pending deal for Altria to purchase 35% of Juul Labs should serve as a 'wake-up call' for the careful monitoring of competition in the nicotine delivery market, and for evaluating how regulations and policies impact cigarette and non-cigarette firms selling alternative nicotine delivery products, says a Georgetown University professor.
Livestock bones help date the earliest spread of millet grains outside China
New research from Washington University in St. Louis and Kiel University in Germany uses DNA from the skeletal remains of sheep and goats to show that animals first domesticated in the Near East had reached eastern Kazakhstan by 2700 BC, and that these animals were fed millet grain first domesticated in China to help them survive harsh winters.
Paper: As an act of self-disclosure, workplace creativity can be risky business
It's increasingly common for managers to instruct employees to 'be creative' during brainstorming sessions.
New study confirms the long-term benefits of a low-fat diet
A team led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has identified several women's health benefits from a low-fat diet.
Secret messages hidden in light-sensitive polymers
Scientists from the CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université have recently shown how valuable light-sensitive macromolecules are: when exposed to the right wavelength of light, they can be transformed so as to change, erase or decode the molecular message that they contain.
Racial disparity in Houston's pretrial population
This report examines racial and ethnic disparity among jail bookings and the pretrial population in Harris County so that we are better able to inform and prioritize approaches to pretrial equity.
Comparing opioid prescription fills after surgery across countries
Higher proportions of patients in the United States and Canada filled opioid prescriptions after surgery compared with Sweden.
NASA estimates Hurricane Dorian's massive Bahama rainfall totals
Hurricane Dorian dropped excessive rainfall on the Bahamas and NASA calculated the rainfall the storm generated.
Realistic robots get under Galápagos lizards' skin
Male lava lizards are sensitive to the timing of their opponents' responses during contest displays, with quicker responses being perceived as more aggressive, a study in Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology suggests.
Ritual suffering improves psychological well-being
Extreme ritual practices involving pain and suffering pose significant risks such as injury, trauma, or infection.
Transport proteins provide key to improve infant formula
Researchers identify and functionally describe key transport proteins, which contribute to creating a healthy early life gut microbiota.
The argument for sexual selection in bacteria
The evolutionary pressure to pass on DNA can produce behavior that otherwise makes no sense in a struggle to survive.
New methods for optimization of vibration shock protection systems are proposed
Nowadays the words ''uncertainty'' and ''multicriteria'' characterize in a best way the relevance and complexity of modern problems of management of a variety of dynamic objects and processes.
Charge fluctuations, a new property in superconductors
An experiment conducted jointly at the ESRF European Synchrotron Radiation Facility by the Politecnico di Milano, National Research Council, the Università La Sapienza di Roma and the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg has revealed a new property of cuprates, so-called high critical temperature superconductors.
Many older adults aren't fully prepared for emergency situations, poll finds
Most people over age 50 say they're ready for natural disasters and emergency situations, but a new national poll shows that many haven't taken key steps to protect their health and well-being in case of severe weather, long-term power outages or other situations.
Methane-producing microorganism makes a meal of iron
A new understanding of how a microorganism produces methane and carbon dioxide could eventually allow researchers to manipulate how much of these important greenhouse gases escape into the atmosphere.
Regenstrief scientist recommends ways to improve electronic health records
In an editorial in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Regenstrief Institute research scientist Michael Weiner, MD, MPH highlights shortcomings of electronic health records (EHRs) in living up to their full potential, and suggests ways to use EHRs to work more efficiently and ultimately more effectively for patients.
By comparing needles to mosquitoes, new model offers insights into Hepatitis C solutions
Removing used needles does not reduce the spread of Hepatitis C virus -- instead, changing the ratio of infected to uninfected needles is critical, study finds.
How California wildfires can impact water availability
A new study by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) uses a numerical model of an important watershed in California to shed light on how wildfires can affect large-scale hydrological processes, such as stream flow, groundwater levels, and snowpack and snowmelt.
Study finds women at greater risk of depression, anxiety after hysterectomy
Hysterectomy is associated with an increased risk of long-term mental health issues, especially depression and anxiety, according to a cohort study by Mayo Clinic researchers involving nearly 2,100 women.
80% cut in antibiotics entering Thames is needed to avoid surge in superbugs
The amount of antibiotics entering the River Thames would need to be cut by as much as 80 per cent to avoid the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant 'superbugs', a new study has shown.
Ancient animal species: Fossils dating back 550 million years among first animal trails
Shuhai Xiao, a professor of geosciences, calls the unearthed fossils, including the bodies and trails left by an ancient animal species, the most convincing sign of ancient animal mobility, dating back about 550 million years.
CU School of Medicine researcher makes key finding related to pre-mRNA splicing
A new study led by scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine offers insight into the mechanism of a key cellular process.
Location matters for home-based female entrepreneurs says new study
A study of 1800 working-aged residents in a public apartment complex in Colombia found that women were more likely to run a home-based business when their randomly-assigned unit was on the ground floor.
Ageing research to accelerate with experimental validation in AI-powered drug discovery
Today the Biogerontology Research Foundation announced the publication of the first experimental validation of a novel small molecule generation engine implementing the generative tensorial reinforcement learning (GENTRL) approach.
Study maps genetics of early progression in TB
Study identifies possible gene variants that determine whether a person infected with TB will progress rapidly to active disease.
Space dragons: Researchers observe energy consumption in quasars
Researchers, for the first time, have observed the accelerated rate at which eight quasars consume interstellar fuel to feed their black holes.
Protein tangles linked with dementia seen in patients after single head injury
Scientists have visualized for the first time protein 'tangles' associated with dementia in the brains of patients who have suffered a single head injury.
Death march of segmented animal unravels critical evolutionary puzzle
The death march of a segmented bilaterian animal unearthed from ~550-million-year-old rocks in China shows that the oldest mobile and segmented animals evolved by the Ediacaran Period (635-539 million years ago).
Future of LEDs Gets Boost from Verification of Localization States in InGaN Quantum Wells
LEDs made of indium gallium nitride provide better luminescence efficiency than many of the other materials used to create blue and green LEDs, but a big challenge of working with InGaN is its known dislocation density defects that make it difficult to understand its emission properties.
Autism study stresses importance of communicating with all infants
A new study from a UT Dallas assistant professor affiliated with the Infant Brain Imaging Study network that included infants later diagnosed with autism suggests that all children benefit from exposure to rich speech environments from their caregivers.
Albeit it exists: Unexpected new material has been quenched to ambient pressure
Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology MISIS together with colleagues from Germany and Sweden achieved a result that seemed impossible.
Super shrimp designed at Ben-Gurion University could increase yield and prevent disease
''We were able to achieve the monosex population without the use of hormones or genetic modifications and thus address two major agricultural considerations: monosex populations and ecological concerns,'' says Levy.
Brain circuit connects feeding and mood in response to stress
An international team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine looked into the possibility of crosstalk between eating and mood and discovered a brain circuit in mouse models that connects the feeding and the mood centers of the brain.
Electronic glove offers 'humanlike' features for prosthetic hand users
An electronic glove, or e-glove, developed by Purdue University researchers can be worn over a prosthetic hand to provide humanlike softness, warmth, appearance and sensory perception, such as the ability to sense pressure, temperature and hydration.
Pain medication use by children after common surgeries
About 400 caregivers reported pain medication use by children after common surgeries such as hernia, elbow fracture, appendectomy or adenoid removal in this study.
Kids in neighbourhoods with larger households less likely to be killed in house fires
There is safety in numbers. That's one of the key findings of a study published today in CMAJ Open that found a child's risk of death or injury in a residential fire was greatly reduced in neighborhoods with larger than average households.
Study: no link between 'extreme' personal grooming, STDs
Women who choose to shave or wax their pubic hair might not be raising their risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) after all, according to a new study that found no connection between 'extreme' grooming and chlamydia or gonorrhea.
NASA analyzed Tropical Storm Fernand's strength before landfall
NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the National Hurricane Center with infrared data and cloud top temperature information for Tropical Storm Fernand as it was making landfall in northeastern Mexico.
Scientists invented how to improve steel properties by 100 times
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University developed a new method of ion implantation that dramatically expands the application of the alloying process in the industry.
New peanut allergy treatment shows effectiveness and safety
Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) trial participants tolerated between 10 and 20 times more peanut protein than it would take for someone to get sick.
New model predicts Painted Lady butterfly migrations based on breeding sites data
Researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE) have developed a model that allows predicting the migratory movements of the Painted Lady butterfly between Europe and Africa based on data from breeding sites.
New insight into motor neuron death mechanisms could be a step toward ALS treatment
Researchers have made an important advance toward understanding why certain cells in the nervous system are prone to breaking down and dying, which is what happens in patients with ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders.
Natural ways of cooling cities
ETH scientists have been researching the effect of precipitation and population size on rising temperatures in cities compared with the surrounding countryside.
Putting a price on carbon pollution alone unlikely to help reach climate goals
Imperial researchers show that carbon taxes alone cannot reduce emissions enough to reach the Paris Agreement targets.
Mathematical model provides new support for environmental taxes
A new mathematical model provides support for environmental taxation, such as carbon taxes, as an effective strategy to promote environmentally friendly practices without slowing economic growth.
New insulation technique paves the way for more powerful and smaller chips
Researchers at KU Leuven and imec (Belgium) have successfully developed a new technique to insulate microchips.
Once scarce, neonatal intensive care proliferates
Is NICU care being driven by medical need or competition?
Why transporters really matter for cell factories
Scientists discover the secret behind some protein transporters' superiority. One transporter, MAE1, can export organic acids out of yeast spending close-to-zero energy.
School district secessions in the South have deepened racial segregation between school systems
Since 2000, school district secessions in the South have increasingly sorted white and black students, and white and Hispanic students, into separate school systems, weakening the potential to improve school integration, according to a new study published today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.
Publication highlights care challenges of dementia-related psychosis
It is estimated that over 2 million Americans with dementia experience delusions (false beliefs) and hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that others do not see or hear).
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, September 2019
ORNL story tips: ORNL's project for VA bridges computing prowess, VA health data to speed up suicide risk screenings for US veterans; ORNL reveals ionic liquid additive lubricates better than additives in commercial gear oil; researchers use neutron scattering to probe colorful new material that could improve sensors, vivid displays; unique 3D printing approach adds more strength, toughness in certain materials.
Heart failure deaths are highest in the poorest US counties
Death rates from heart failure are higher in counties with higher levels of poverty.
Researchers move beyond sequencing and create a 3D genome
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have taken whole genome sequencing to the next level by creating a 3D map of the genome to better understand development and disease.
Sex and height might influence neck posture when viewing electronic handheld devices
Sex and height appear to influence how people flex their neck when viewing handheld devices, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Arkansas.
Negotiation: A three-step solution to affordable prescription drugs
Criteria are offered by Harvard University and George Mason University experts for Medicare to negotiate drug prices and prioritize specific drugs for maximum savings.
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Mortality rates in Ebola survivors after hospital discharge could be five times higher compared with the general population
In the first year after hospital discharge, mortality in Ebola survivors was five times higher than would be expected in general Guinean population (55 deaths versus 11 deaths), according to an observational study of 1,130 people published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.
Discovered a molecule that regulates the development of cancer in a variety of tumors
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute (IJC), discover that a non-coding region of the genome originates a key molecule for the proliferation of tumors in breast cancer and some types of sarcoma.
Biophysics: Stretching proteins with magnetic tweezers
Physicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have developed a highly sensitive method for measuring the mechanical stability of protein conformations, and used it to monitor the early steps in the formation of blood clots.
Single traumatic brain injury can have long-term consequences for cognition
A single incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to long-lasting neurodegeneration, according to a study of 32 individuals.
Young adults exposed to incarceration as children prone to depression
Young adults with childhood history of both parental incarceration and juvenile justice involvement were nearly three times more likely to have depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to peers without any experience with the criminal justice system, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open.
Patients in the US and Canada are likely to receive opioids after surgery
Patients in the United States and Canada are seven times as likely as those in Sweden to receive a prescription for opioid medications after surgery, according to a new multi-institutional study led by researchers from Penn Medicine.
New viruses discovered in endangered wild Pacific salmon populations
Three new viruses -- including one from a group of viruses never before shown to infect fish -- have been discovered in endangered Chinook and sockeye salmon populations.
Minority students still underrepresented in medical schools
While numbers of black and Hispanic physicians have increased, Penn study shows the physician workforce does not represent the shifting demographics of the US population.
Planetary collisions can drop the internal pressures in planets
A new study finds that collisions between planetary bodies, such as the event that created Earth's moon, could abruptly drop the planet's internal pressure.
Automated text analysis: The next frontier of marketing innovation
The volumes of text data generated in the marketplace can be valuable in generating marketing insights using the newest text analysis methods and technologies.
NASA catches the eye of Typhoon Lingling
Typhoon Lingling continues to strengthen in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and NASA's Terra satellite imagery revealed the eye is now visible.
From the tropics to the boreal, temperature drives ecosystem functioning
University of Arizona researchers found a tight link between temperature and plant and microbe communities within forests, which will allow them to predict how ecosystems might respond to climate changes.
NASA catches Hurricane Juliette over Mexico's Socorro Island
Although Hurricane Juliette is no longer a major hurricane in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite revealed there are still powerful thunderstorms around its center and captured an image of the storm over Socorro Island, Mexico.
How 'information gerrymandering' influences voters
Study shows how information networks can distort voters' perceptions and change election results.
Squirrels listen in to birds' conversations as signal of safety
Grey squirrels eavesdrop on the chatter between nearby songbirds as a sign of safety, according to a paper by Marie Lilly and colleagues at Oberlin College in the United States, publishing Sept.
Medical marijuana laws impact use among sexual minorities differently than heterosexuals
Bisexual women had higher rates of past-year and daily marijuana use compared to heterosexual women, and gay/lesbian women were also more likely to report daily marijuana use and past year medical marijuana use than heterosexual women.
GPM finds a band of heavy rainfall in Tropical Storm Gabrielle
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided information about the rate in which rain was falling within the Eastern Atlantic Ocean's latest tropical storm, Gabrielle.
Pharmacists in the ER speed delivery of coagulation drug to bleeding patients
A first-of-its-kind study has found that when a pharmacist is present in the emergency room, patients on blood thinners who experience life-threatening bleeding receive a live-saving coagulation drug much more quickly.
Study shows BioCell collagen can visibly reduce common signs of skin aging within 12 weeks
In one of the most substantial studies of a skin health supplement, BioCell Collagen®, was found to visibly reduce common signs of skin aging, including lines and wrinkles, within 12 weeks of daily use.
New members found in a transcription factor complex that maintains beta cells
A protein complex in the nucleus of beta cells contains different proteins that work together to regulate genes important for the development and maintenance of functional beta cells.
'Information gerrymandering' poses a threat to democratic decision making, both online and off
Concern over fake news and online trolls is widespread and warranted, but researchers led by the University of Pennsylvania's Joshua Plotkin and the University of Houston's Alexander Stewart have identified another impediment to the free flow of information in social networks.
New research offers solution to reduce organ shortage crisis
Eighteen people die every day waiting for transplants, and a new patient is added to the organ transplant list every 10 minutes.
Genome mining reveals novel production pathway for promising malaria treatment
Researchers at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois are exploring the relationship between microbial natural products and the gene clusters that enable their production.
DNA repair: Opening the hatch to heal the break
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have determined the structure of a key enzyme complex that is involved in DNA repair, and traced the cycle of conformational changes that it undergoes while performing its biochemical function.
New guideline clarifies role of radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer treatment
A new clinical guideline from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) provides recommendations on the use of radiation therapy to treat patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, including when radiation treatments are appropriate; optimal dosing, timing and fractionation; and strategies to prevent and mitigate common side effects of treatment.
An examination of prosecutorial staff, budgets, caseloads and the need for change
This research brief will provide an overview of prosecutor offices in the largest US counties along with their funding allocations and staff differentials.
Soldiers, athletes could improved outcomes from traumatic brain injuries
A traumatic brain injury is often easily suspected and can be confirmed and treated if necessary following an injury using a blood analysis, but scientists are reporting that even one mild blast to the brain can cause very subtle but permanent damage as well.
NIH, Cincinnati Children's scientists develop possible strategy for cancer drug resistance
NCATS and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center scientists have devised a potential treatment against leukemia that could have implications for other cancers.
It is best not to fly to conferences
The political scientist Sebastian Jäckle develops a climate-friendly concept for international conference tourism.
Benefits of cognitive behavioural therapy for IBS continue 2 years after treatment
Previous research led by Professor Hazel Everitt at the University of Southampton and researchers at King's College London, showed that CBT delivered over the telephone or online is more effective than current standard care one year after treatment.
Is childhood criminal justice exposure associated with risk of poor adult mental health?
A childhood history of both personal involvement in the juvenile justice system and parental incarceration was associated with a greater likelihood of depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder in young adulthood compared to peers without those experiences in this observational study.
New mathematical model can improve radiation therapy of brain tumours
Researchers have developed a new model to optimize radiation therapy and significantly increase the number of tumor cells killed during treatment.
Artificial intelligence used to recognize primate faces in the wild
Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed new artificial intelligence software to recognize and track the faces of individual chimpanzees in the wild.
Poor oral health linked to cognitive decline, perceived stress, Rutgers studies find
Two Rutgers studies explore the relationship between poor oral health and cognitive decline and the effects of perceived stress and social support on dry mouth among older Chinese Americans.
It's not aurora, it's STEVE
Researchers recently confirmed that the aurora-like lights known as STEVE are not actually aurora, but instead a unique phenomenon.
NUS study reveals similarities in human, chimpanzee, and bonobo eye colour patterns
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have revealed that chimpanzees and bonobos share the contrasting colour pattern seen in human eyes, which makes it easy for them to detect the direction of someone's gaze from a distance.
Seeking moments of disorder
Scientists discover a new, long-hypothesized material state with a signature of quantum disordered liquid-like magnetic moments.
New insights on brain connections that are disrupted in patients with coma
New research sheds light on which connections between brain regions may be severed in patients with coma.
Vast majority of dementia patients don't receive specialty diagnosis and care, study finds
In the first large study to examine the diagnosis of dementia in older Americans over time, researchers found the vast majority never meet with a dementia specialist and 85% of individuals were first diagnosed by a non-dementia specialist physician.
Low income cancer patients and those without insurance see fewer trial benefits
When it comes to benefiting from experimental treatments offered in cancer clinical trials, your health insurance status and where you live matters, according to results of two new research studies to be presented at the 2019 ASCO Quality Care Symposium, held September 6 and 7, 2019 in San Diego.
A novel recipe for efficiently removing intrinsic defects from hard crystals
A team of researchers from Osaka University, the Institute for High Pressure Physics and the Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russia), and TU Dresden (Germany), discovered an effective method for removing lattice defects from crystals.
Emoji buttons gauge emergency department sentiments in real time
Simple button terminals stationed around emergency departments featuring 'emoji' reflecting a range of emotions are effective in monitoring doctor and patient sentiments in real time.
Emergency department openings and closures impact resources for heart attack patients
A new study has found that hospital emergency room closures can adversely affect health outcomes for heart attack patients at neighboring hospitals that are near or at full capacity.
Brown trout genome will help explain species' genetic superpowers
Better conservation and management of fish stocks is on the horizon, after the completion of the brown trout reference genome by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators.
Laser-based ultrasound approach provides new direction for nondestructive testing
Many industrial buildings rely on ultrasound instruments that continually monitor the structural integrity of their systems without damaging or altering their features.
How natural genetic differences can affect heart health
New study identifies genetic variants that may alter platelet function in cardiovascular disease
Solutions to urban heat differ between tropical and drier climes
In summer heat, cities may swelter more than nearby suburbs and rural areas.
Denisovan finger bone more closely resembles modern human digits than Neanderthals
Scientists have identified the missing part of a finger bone fragment from the Denisova Cave in southern Siberia, revealing that Denisovans -- an early human population discovered when the original fragment was genetically sequenced in 2010 -- had fingers indistinguishable from modern humans despite being more closely related to Neanderthals.
Underwater soundscapes reveal differences in marine environments
Storms, boat traffic, animal noises and more contribute to the underwater sound environment in the ocean, even in areas considered protected.
Vegetarian and pescetarian diets linked to lower risk of coronary heart disease
Vegetarian (including vegan) and pescetarian diets may be linked to a lower risk of coronary heart disease, or CHD for short, than diets that include meat, suggest the findings of a large UK study published in The BMJ today.
'Resonance' raman spectroscopy with 1-nm resolution
Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy resolved 'resonance' Raman scattering with 1-nm resolution in ultrathin zinc oxide films epitaxially grown on a single-crystal silver surface.
Livestock disease risk tied to herd management style
A new look at the prevalence of the widespread and often fatal sheep and goat plague virus in Tanzania reveals that livestock managed in a system where they are the sole source of an owners' livelihood are more likely to become infected than livestock managed in a system where the owners' livelihood is supplemented by agriculture.
Psychiatric disorders may be linked to unnecessary oophorectomies
Undergoing a hysterectomy, especially in conjunction with removal of the ovaries, can take a major toll on a woman's mental health.
Researchers develop a tool for rapid breakdown of cellular proteins
A new study improves the efficacy of a method based on AID technology.
How sepsis care program saves lives and reduces costs
A sepsis care quality improvement program saves lives, shortens hospital stays and reduces healthcare costs, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago.
European whitefish is healthy to eat, but the nutritional quality varies among season
An international team of scientists shed new light to the nutritional quality of whitefish.
Has racial/ethnic representation changed among US medical students?
This analysis reports black, Hispanic and American Indian or Alaska Native students remain underrepresented in allopathic medical schools when compared with the US population, despite new diversity accreditation guidelines.
How do social networks shape political decision-making?
New research shows that social media's influence on voting goes beyond bots and foreign interference.
Polypill holds promise for tackling cardiovascular disease
A team of researchers Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center evaluated whether it would be cost-effective to combine several medications into a single 'cardiovascular polypill' for patients who have had a previous heart attack or stroke, instead of prescribing the four drugs individually.
Genetic factors influencing adult obesity take effect in early childhood
Body mass index (BMI) in infants, children and adults is influenced by different genetic factors that change as we age, according to a major new study.
Potential vaccine treats and prevents deadly streptococcal toxic shock
A new vaccine developed by Griffith University Institute for Glycomics researchers has the potential to treat and prevent toxic shock caused by invasive streptococcal disease, which kills more than 160,000 people every year.
NASA finds strongest storms off-center in Tropical Storm 14W  
NASA's Terra satellite provided an infrared view and temperature analysis of Tropical Storm 14W's cloud tops.
ASNC announces multisocietal cardiac amyloidosis imaging consensus
ASNC assembled a writing team of 26 experts in cardiovascular imaging and amyloidosis representing nine societies to author Expert Consensus Recommendations For Multimodality Imaging in Cardiac Amyloidosis.
The state of China's climate in 2018: More extreme events, but less loss
National Climate Center (NCC) of China has just completed a report to give an accessible and authoritative assessment of the climate in China based on the NCC operational system.

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