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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 06, 2019


Mysterious vaping illness characterized by fat-laden cells in the lung
University of Utah Health investigators have identified a previously unrecognized characteristic of the vaping-related respiratory illness that has been emerging in clusters across the US in recent months.
GPM satellite finds heavy rainfall on northern side of typhoon Lingling
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the rainfall rates happening within Typhoon Lingling and found the heaviest precipitation on its northern side.
Pain in the asp: Bird-deterring nets create haven for stinging pests
While collecting data from live oak trees in the world's largest medical center, Rice University evolutionary ecologists have discovered huge quantities of one of North America's most venomous caterpillars.
Study examines suicide at county level in US
This study examined patterns of suicide in the United States at the county level during an 18-year period and looked at associated geographic and community-level factors.
Biomarker identified for early beta cell death in Type 1 diabetes
Beta cells in the pancreas produce insulin. Their death is a key feature of Type 1 diabetes, and that loss starts long before diagnosis.
Evidence suggests rare deer lived 50 years beyond 'extinction'
Schomburgk's deer (Rucervus schomburgki) was added to the extinction list in 1938.
Heating pads may lower blood pressure in people with high blood pressure when lying down
In people with supine hypertension due to autonomic failure, a condition that increases blood pressure when lying down, overnight heat therapy significantly decreased systolic blood pressure compared to a placebo.
Bad to the bone or just bad behavior?
A new study out of Columbia University suggests that the way we perceive others' bad behavior -- as either biological and innate or potentially changeable -- impacts our willingness to cut them some slack.
High blood pressure affects young, healthy medical students
A small study of medical students found that almost two-thirds had abnormal blood pressure levels.
Key enzyme found in plants could guide development of medicines and other products
Researchers from the Salk Institute studying how plants evolved the abilities to make natural chemicals, which they use to adapt to stress, have uncovered how an enzyme called chalcone isomerase evolved to enable plants to make products vital to their own survival.
Why should you care about AI used for hiring?
The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology has published a new white paper that explores the hype and mystique surrounding artificial intelligence in hiring.
South African study highlights links between low language ability and poor mental health
A new study from our researchers at the universities of Bath (UK) and Stellenbosch (South Africa) focuses on language acquisition for young people in Khayelitsha near Cape Town.
NASA finds a weaker hurricane Juliette
Hurricane Juliette has been weakening and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a look at the strength of storms within.
Allergic diseases increase the risk of adult-onset asthma
A Finnish study found that the more allergic diseases an individual has, the higher the asthma risk.
More targeted, less toxic: The golden future of cancer treatment
New synthetic molecules are up to 24 times more effective at killing cancer cells than a widely-used cancer drug and they're built with resistance-fighting features to keep them effective over time, unlike current chemotherapies.
More time spent standing helps combat effects of sedentary lifestyle
A study conducted by scientists from the University of Granada and published in the journal PLOS ONE recommends that people spend more time standing, to increase energy expenditure and thus avoid the negative health problems associated with a sedentary li
NASA sees gabrielle go 'post-tropical...' for now
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the Eastern Atlantic Ocean and observed that Tropical Storm Gabrielle had become post-tropical.
Nanoparticles in lithium-sulphur batteries detected with neutron experiment
An HZB team has for the first time precisely analysed how nanoparticles of lithium sulphide and sulphur precipitate onto battery electrodes during the course of the charging cycle.
Motion perception of large objects gets worse during infant development
Humans can visually perceive the motion of a small object better than that of a large one.
9/11 World Trade Center exposure linked to heart disease among NYC firefighters
A study of New York City firefighters finds that exposure to 9/11 World Trade Center (WTC) dust is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Study locates brain areas for understanding metaphors in healthy and schizophrenic people
Scientists have used MRI scanners to discover the parts of the brain which understand metaphors, in both healthy volunteers and people with schizophrenia.
Disturbed childhood can lead to adult insomnia
Parents should help their children with better sleep patterns, along with any problem behavioural issues, because this can lead to severe insomnia in middle age, a groundbreaking new study shows.
NASA finds Akoni already post-tropical
Tropical Storm Akoni had a quick life as a tropical storm before transitioning into a post-tropical storm.
Disrupting the gut microbiome may affect some immune responses to flu vaccination
The normal human gut microbiome is a flourishing community of microorganisms, some of which can affect the human immune system.
New wildfire models to predict how wildfires will burn in next 20 minutes
While it's impossible to predict just where the next wildfire will start, new Department of Defense-sponsored research from BYU's Fire Research Lab is getting into the microscopic details of how fires initiate to provide more insight into how wildfires burn through wildland fuels.
Resilience protects pregnant women against negative effects of stress
Researchers from the University of Granada have, for the first time, analysed the protective role of resilience in pregnancy, by studying the levels of cortisol present in the expectant mother's hair, along with her psychological state.
Climate change water variability hurts salamander populations
New research from the University of Montana suggests that streamflow variability brought on by climate change will negatively affect the survival of salamanders.
Role of cancer protein ARID1A at intersection of genome stability and tumor suppression
The ARID1A tumor suppressor protein is required to maintain telomere cohesion and correct chromosome segregation after DNA replication.
Not all meat is created equal: How diet changes can sustain world's food production
David Vaccari, an environmental engineer at Stevens Institute of Technology, has created a model that predicts how several different conservation approaches could reduce demand for a nonrenewable resource that is absolutely vital for feeding the world: phosphorus.
Black, Hispanic patients more likely to be brought to safety-net hospital emergency rooms
A new national study done by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center showed large differences in the emergency department (ED) and hospital destinations of minority (Black and Hispanic) patients who are transported by emergency medical services (EMS) when compared with their non-Hispanic white counterparts.
New compound promotes healing of myelin in nervous system disorders
Researchers working with mice have developed a compound that promotes rebuilding of the protective sheath around nerve cells that's damaged in conditions such as multiple sclerosis.
Sum of three cubes for 42 finally solved -- using real life planetary computer
Hot on the heels of the ground-breaking 'Sum-Of-Three-Cubes' solution for the number 33, a team led by the University of Bristol and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has solved the final piece of the famous 65-year-old maths puzzle with an answer for the most elusive number of all - 42.
Combating prison recidivism with plants
The United States currently incarcerates the greatest percentage of its population compared with any other nation in the world.
NASA examines Dorian's rainfall, temperatures along Carolina coast
As Hurricane Dorian continued to lash the coast of the Carolinas NASA's IMERG assessed the rainfall the storm generated and NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the temperatures of the cloud tops to assess strength.
Long-term opioid use has known link to low testosterone but not many men screened, treated
Long-term opioid use previously has been linked with low testosterone in men.
Beyond borders: Understanding migration requires understanding changing land systems
For tens of millions of people, migration is a tough reality.
Sugar alters compounds that impact brain health in fruit flies
When fruit flies are exposed to a high sugar diet, key metabolites associated with brain health become depleted, according to a University of Michigan study.
Typhoid toxin accelerates cell aging to enhance killer infection, study reveals
Scientists have revealed how the typhoid toxin works to hijack DNA repair machines and accelerate the aging of cells, a breakthrough that could pave the way for new strategies to combat the killer disease.
A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs
Twenty people die waiting for an organ transplant every day in the US, but lab-grown organs so far lack the cellular density, vasculature, and functions required to make them viable replacements.
GIS and eDNA analysis system successfully used to discover new habitats of rare salamander
A research team has successfully identified an unknown population of the endangered Yamato salamander (Hynobius vandenburghi) in Gifu Prefecture, using a methodology combining GIS and eDNA analysis.
Measuring changes in magnetic order to find ways to transcend conventional electronics
Researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed an approach for precisely measuring changes in the magnetic order of antiferromagnetic materials in real time.
97% of footballers in the Spanish League unaware of banned substances
A study conducted by researchers from the University of Granada has also found that 95% of footballers do not even know what this agency is for.
How our brain filters sounds
When two identical sounds are repeated quickly, a filter reduces the attention that the brain directs to the second sound it hears.
Feeding dogs and cats with raw food is not considered a significant source of infections
An extensive international survey conducted at the University of Helsinki indicates that pet owners do not consider raw food to considerably increase infection risk in their household.
Racial/ethnic differences in emergency department destination of EMS for patients living in same area
Black and Hispanic Medicare patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS) to an emergency department (ED) were less likely to go to the same ED as white Medicare patients living in the same area.
Speech impairment in five-year-old international adoptees with cleft palate
In a group of internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate, speech at age five is impaired compared to a corresponding group of children born in Sweden, a study shows.
Sound deprivation in one ear leads to speech recognition difficulties
Chronic conductive hearing loss, which can result from middle-ear infections, has been linked to speech recognition deficits, according to the results of a new study of 240 patients, led by scientists at Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
Fe metabolic engineering method succeeds in producing 1,2,4-butanetriol sustainably from biomass
A more environmentally-friendly and sustainable method of producing the useful chemical 1,2,4-butanetriol has been discovered.
Mammography unlikely to benefit older women with chronic illnesses
Regular screening mammograms are unlikely to benefit women 75 and older who have chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes.
Teens who don't date are less depressed and have better social skills
Adolescents who were not in romantic relationships during middle and high school had good social skills and low depression, and fared better or equal to peers who dated.
Discovered the potential of antihistamines that cause the death of leukaemic stem cells
The IJC Leukaemic Stem Cell research group, led by Ruth M.
Is exposure to world trade center disaster associated with cardiovascular disease risk for NY firefighters
A study of nearly 9,800 Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) male firefighters suggests an association between greater exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and long-term cardiovascular disease risk, while the results of other studies have been mixed.
Scientists couple magnetization to superconductivity for quantum discoveries
In a recent study, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have created a miniaturized chip-based superconducting circuit that couples quantum waves of magnetic spins called magnons to photons of equivalent energy.
How to make a book last for millennia
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere determine the unique composition of a surface layer on the Temple Scroll, one of the best-preserved of the more than 2,000-year-old Dead Sea Scrolls, to uncover the ancient production technology.
Transgender, gender-nonbinary teens in china report abuse, neglect, bullying
Most transgender and gender-nonbinary teens in China who participated in a national survey study reported abuse, neglect or bullying at home and in school, which the researchers suggest may be due in part to the socially conservative values prevalent in the country.  The study included 385 adolescents (average age nearly 17) who responded to an online survey.
Science puts historical claims to the test
Two studies recently published in EPJ Plus show that today's analytical techniques are sufficiently advanced to differentiate between authentic historical artefacts and those that aren't quite what they seem.
Gender discrimination holding women back in veterinary practice
Research by Lancaster University Management School and Open University Business School shows women face discrimination and occupy fewer places in the higher reaches of the veterinary profession, even as they begin to outnumber men in the field.
How do we get so many different types of neurons in our brain?
SMU (Southern Methodist University) researchers have discovered another layer of complexity in gene expression, which could help explain how we're able to have so many billions of neurons in our brain.
Preclinical study reveals the impact of age on immunotherapy treatment for breast cancer
In order to understand the influence of aging on the effectiveness of immune checkpoint blockade therapy, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School conducted preclinical studies using younger and older mice with triple negative breast cancer, finding that age affects the efficacy of ICB therapy.
Innovative method provides unique insights into the structure of cells and tissues
Cells are the basic building blocks of life. The chemical composition of cells can be determined by mass spectrometry.
Player athleticism increases head impact exposure in youth football
Speed, agility and strength are definitely assets on the football field.
Suicide rates climbing, especially in rural America
Suicide is becoming more common in America, an increase most pronounced in rural areas, new research has found.
NASA finds classic comma-shape in tropical storm Faxai
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and looked at comma-shaped Tropical Storm Faxai in infrared light.
Earliest spread of millet agriculture outside China linked to herding livestock
5000 years before the modern rise of millet as a popular grain, this Chinese crop was spread far and wide by ancient food aficionados, not for their plates but instead for their animals, suggests new research from an international collaboration led by Kiel University (Germany) and Washington University in St.
Two blood-clotting disorders with different causes interact synergistically
In a preclinical study published in the journal Blood, researchers have found a synergistic connection, or crosstalk, between two rare but potentially deadly blood-clotting diseases -- thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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