Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 09, 2019


Addressing food insecurity in health care settings
A review of articles covering food insecurity interventions in health care settings from 2000-2018 found that interventions focused on either referrals or direct provision of food or vouchers both suffered from poor follow-up, a general lack of comparison groups, and limited statistical power and generalizability.
ADHD medication: How much is too much for a hyperactive child?
When children with ADHD don't respond well to Methylphenidate (MPH, also known as Ritalin) doctors often increase the dose.
NASA estimates Hurricane Dorian's massive rainfall track
On Monday morning, September 9, Hurricane Dorian was a post-tropical storm after a mid-latitude weather front and cold seas had altered its tropical characteristics over the weekend.
BioMILD trial demonstrates lung cancer screening using MicroRNA blood test enhances prevention
Lung cancer screening efforts have accelerated in the last decade, with researchers showing that low dose CT screening is effective in reducing lung cancer mortality.
World's largest evidence review: Nutritional supplements for mental health
We've all heard that 'food is good for your mood'.
Building blocks of bird babble identified
A new study by an international team headed by the University of Zurich sheds light on whether animal vocalizations, like human words, are constructed from smaller building blocks.
Are there health consequences associated with not using a smartphone?
Many studies have examined the health effects of smartphone abuse, but a new study looks at the sociodemographic features and health indicators of people who have a smartphone but do not use it regularly.
Feeling legs again improves ampu-tees' health
Two volunteers are the first above-knee amputees in the world to feel their prosthetic foot and knee in real time.
For better adult mental and relational health, boost positive childhood experiences
Positive childhood experiences, such as supportive family interactions, caring relationships with friends, and connections in the community, are associated with reductions in chances of adult depression and poor mental health, and increases in the chances of having healthy relationships in adulthood, a new study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.
Afterglow sheds light on the nature, origin of neutron star collisions
An international team led by Northwestern University has painstakingly constructed the afterglow of GW170817, the historic neutron star merger captured in 2017, using images from the Hubble Space Telescope.
Metal-organic framework nanoribbons
The nanostructure of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) plays an important role in various applications since different nanostructures usually exhibit different properties and functions.
Success of gene therapy for a form of inherited blindness depends on timing
An FDA-approved gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis, an inherited vision disorder with a childhood onset and progressive nature, has improved patients' sight.
Teeth offer vital clues about diet during the Great Irish Famine
Scientific analysis of dental calculus -- plaque build-up -- of the Famine's victims found evidence of corn (maize), oats, potato, wheat and milk foodstuffs.
Scottish study shows that autoantibody test followed by CT imaging may reduce lung cancer mortality
A combination of the EarlyCDT-Lung Test followed by CT imaging in Scottish patients at risk for lung cancer resulted in a significant decrease in late stage diagnosis of lung cancer and may decrease lung cancer specific mortality, according to research presented at IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).
Intergenerational relationships promote aging immigrants' health, lower caregivers' stress
Filial piety is central to the Chinese concept of family and has long shaped intergenerational relationships for older Chinese adults.
The birth of vision, from the retina to the brain
How do neurons differentiate to become individual components of the visual system?
Plastics, fuels and chemical feedstocks from CO2? They're working on it
Four SUNCAT scientists describe recent research results related to the quest to capture CO2 from the smokestacks of factories and power plants and use renewable energy to turn it into industrial feedstocks and fuels.
Major environmental challenge as microplastics are harming our drinking water
Plastics in our waste streams are breaking down into tiny particles, causing potentially catastrophic consequences for human health and our aquatic systems, finds research from the University of Surrey and Deakin's Institute for Frontier Materials.
Threatened species habitat destruction shows federal laws are broken
Human activities have destroyed more than 7.7 million hectares of threatened species habitat, revealing critical failures with Australia's federal environmental protection laws.
New research provides hope for people living with chronic pain
Dr. Gerald Zamponi, Ph.D., and a team with the Cumming School of Medicine's Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) and researchers at Stanford University, California, have been investigating which brain circuits are changed by injury, in order to develop targeted therapies to reset the brain to stop chronic pain.
National lung matrix trial (NLMT)
The largest stratified medicine dataset of non-small cell lung cancer patients indicates further molecular stratifications could benefit from targeted therapies, according to research presented today at the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer, hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer.
Hospital infections declining in Canada
There is good news on the infection front: infections acquired by patients in Canadian hospitals are declining, with a 30% reduction between 2009 and 2017, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Video assisted lung surgery reduces complications and hospital stays compared to open surgery
Video-assisted thoracic surgery is associated with lower in-hospital complications and shorter length of stay compared with open surgery among British patients who were diagnosed at an early stage of lung cancer, according to research presented today the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer, hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer.
Many older hospitalized patients with cancer experience malnutrition
Results from a new study indicate that older hospitalized patients with cancer may have a high risk of being malnourished and experiencing symptoms such as no appetite and nausea, according to findings published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.
Paid family leave improves vaccination rates in infants
Parents who take paid family leave after the birth of a newborn are more likely to have their child vaccinated on time compared to those who do not, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Warm on top, cold below: Unexpected greenhouse gas effect in lakes
A research team led by the University of Basel and the University of Montreal examined how the ongoing climate warming affects the 'behavior' of lakes.
High blood pressure among older pregnant women has increased by more than 75% since 1970
The rate of chronic hypertension among pregnant women age 35 and over in the United States has increased by more than 75% since 1970, with black women suffering from persistent high blood pressure at more than twice the rate of white women, according to a Rutgers University study.
Study: Action-oriented goals produce higher probability of purchases under tight deadlines
People on a tight deadline have stronger intentions to enact behaviors -- whether it's redeeming a coupon or following through on receiving a flu shot -- immediately after moving than after sitting, says research co-written by U. of.
Researchers develop custom data collection system to improve health disparity research
Rutgers researchers develop innovative web-based data collection and management system that addresses linguistic and cultural barriers for researching minority populations.
Experience of being a minority puts US teens at higher risk of anxiety, depression
Puerto Rican teens growing up as minorities in the South Bronx are more likely to experience anxiety and depression than their peers growing up as a majority in Puerto Rico, even under similar conditions of poverty.
The diet-microbiome connection in inflammatory bowel disease
A change in diet is a go-to strategy for treating inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's.
How the justice system can affect physical, mental health
New research finds that being convicted of a crime is associated with a decline in one's physical health, even if the conviction doesn't lead to jail time.
New drug may protect against memory loss in Alzheimer's disease
A new drug discovered through a research collaboration between the University at Buffalo and Tetra Therapeutics may protect against memory loss, nerve damage and other symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.
Electrochemistry breakthrough simplifies creation of coveted molecules for drugs, electronics
A new chemistry method from scientists at Scripps Research greatly simplifies the creation of an important class of compounds called hindered ethers, which are integral to many drugs and commercial products.
Discovery of periodic tables for molecules
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) develop tables similar to the periodic table of elements but for molecules.
Liquid biopsies reveal genetic alterations linked to cancer drug resistance
New research shows that liquid biopsies taken from blood provide a more complete picture than traditional biopsy of both the genetic diversity of a patient's cancer and how tumors evolve drug resistance at the molecular level.
Cheap water treatment
There's nothing new in treating water by sorption of organic solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE).
Hard as a diamond? Scientists predict new forms of superhard carbon
Superhard materials can slice, drill and polish other objects. Now, science is opening the door to the development of new materials with these seductive qualities.
Using a wearable device to exercise more? Add competition to improve results
A clinical trial using a behaviorally designed gamification program found competition worked better than support or collaboration to increase daily step counts.
Scientists alleviate environmental concerns about BCA usage on powdery mildews
This research revealed that mycoparasites can live up to 21-days on mildew-free host plant surfaces, where they can attack powdery mildew structures as soon as they appear.
Acute periodontal disease bacteria love colon and dirt microbes
Mythbuster: The idea that bacterial collaborations within microbiomes, like in the mouth, have evolved to be generous and exclusive very much appears to be wrong.
New study shows why people gain weight as they get older
Many people struggle to keep their weight in check as they get older.
Scientists triple storage time of human donor livers
A new method of preservation maintains human liver tissue for up to 27 hours will give doctors and patients a much longer timeframe for organ transplant.
Association of positive childhood experiences and adult mental health, depression
Reporting more positive childhood experiences was associated with a lower likelihood of adult depression or poor mental heath, or both, and a greater likelihood of adults reporting social and emotional support even after accounting for adverse childhood experiences in this observational study based on survey data representative of the entire population of adults in Wisconsin in 2015.
Offering children a variety of vegetables increases acceptance
Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables.
Brain cells that suppress drug cravings may be the secret to better addiction medicines
Scientists from Scripps Research have shed light on poorly understood brain mechanisms that suppress drug and alcohol cravings, uncovering new insights that may help in the development of better addiction medicines.
Fermilab achieves world-record field strength for accelerator magnet
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab have announced that they achieved the highest magnetic field strength ever recorded for an accelerator steering magnet, setting a world record of 14.1 teslas, with the magnet cooled to 4.5 kelvins or minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
Dietary supplement may help with schizophrenia
A dietary supplement, sarcosine, may help with schizophrenia as part of a holistic approach complementing antipsychotic medication, according to a UCL researcher.
Black sheep: Why some strains of the Epstein Barr virus cause cancer
The Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is very widespread. More than 90 percent of the world's population is infected -- with very different consequences.
Lollies, vitamins and fish-shaped sauce containers hit the MRI mark
A study by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, has identified four common items that could be cheaper and equally effective alternatives to commercial markers for use in MRI scanning to pinpoint specific anatomical areas or pathologies being scanned.
Molecule properties change through light
Green light affects this chemical compound in a different way than blue light.
'Clamp' regulates message transfer between mammal neurons
Today, in the journal Nature Communications, Edwin Chapman, a professor of neuroscience at University of Wisconsin-Madison, has described a key component of the nerve biology system -- the brake, or 'clamp,' that prevents the fusion pore from completing its formation and opening.
The fast and the curious: Fitter adults have fitter brains
In a large study, German scientists have shown that physical fitness is associated with better brain structure and brain functioning in young adults.
Overcoming resistance in pancreatic cancer
In pancreatic cancer cells' struggle to survive, the cells choose alternative routes when their main pathways are blocked by drugs.
Research shows puberty changes the brains of boys and girls differently
Scientists have found that brain networks develop differently in males and females at puberty, with boys showing an increase in connectivity in certain brain areas, and girls showing a decrease in connectivity as puberty progresses.
'Building blocks' of bird calls resemble human languages
New study sheds light on whether animal vocalisations, like human words, are constructed from smaller building-blocks.
How we make decisions depends on how uncertain we are
A new Dartmouth study on how we use reward information for making choices shows how humans and monkeys adopt their decision-making strategies depending on the uncertainty of information present.
Case management in primary care associated with positive outcomes
In a systematic review, researchers identified three characteristics of case management programs that consistently yielded positive results: case selection for frequent users with complex problems, high-intensity case management interventions and a multidisciplinary care plan.
Researchers unearth 'new' extinction
A team of scientists has concluded that earth experienced a previously underestimated severe mass-extinction event, which occurred about 260 million years ago.
How brain rhythms organize our visual perception
Imagine that you are watching a crowded hang-gliding competition, keeping track of a red and orange glider's skillful movements.
Compound offers prospects for preventing acute kidney failure
Russian researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Institute of Cell Biophysics, and elsewhere have shown an antioxidant compound known as peroxiredoxin to be effective in treating kidney injury in mice.
Stretchy plastic electrolytes could enable new lithium-ion battery design
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a promising new cathode and electrolyte system that replaces expensive metals and traditional liquid electrolyte with lower cost transition metal fluorides and a solid polymer electrolyte.
Employee contract structures in startups can be determining factors of success
Conventional wisdom in the startup community is that with the right incentives, the venture can meet and exceed expectations, and a major component of this is how you structure your contracts for founders and early employees.
NIAID officials call for innovative research on sexually transmitted infections
Sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, pose a significant public health challenge.
And then there was light: looking for the first stars in the Universe
Astronomers are closing in on a signal that has been travelling across the Universe for 12 billion years, bringing them nearer to understanding the life and death of the very earliest stars.
Watching music move through the brain
Scientists have observed how the human brain represents a familiar piece of music, according to research published in JNeurosci.
Researchers find regulator of first responder cells to brain injury
Researchers identified nuclear factor I-A (NFIA) as a central regulator of both the generation and activity of reactive astrocytes.
Hidden danger from pet dogs in Africa
Researchers at the Universities of Abuja and Nigeria, in collaboration with the University of Bristol, have detected a potentially human-infective microbe in pet dogs in Nigeria.
Primary care physicians outline barriers to managing chronic kidney disease
On July 10, 2019 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced they were aiming to reduce the number of Americans developing end-stage renal disease by 25% by 2030.
Precious metal flecks could be catalyst for better cancer therapies
Tiny extracts of a precious metal used widely in industry could play a vital role in new cancer therapies.
Repetitive impacts key to understanding sports-associated concussions
Scientists have made a significant advance in our understanding of mild head trauma (concussive brain injury) and how it may be managed and treated in the future.
New salt-based propellant proven compatible in dual-mode rocket engines
For dual-mode rocket engines to be successful, a propellant must function in both combustion and electric propulsion systems.
Hemophilia three times more prevalent than thought
For the World Federation of Hemophilia, Iorio assembled an international team of researchers from France, US and UK to perform a meta-analysis of the registry data in countries with the most comprehensive registries of hemophilia, which were Australia, Canada, France, Italy, New Zealand and the UK.
Researchers develop new interferometric single-molecule localization microscopy
Prof. XU Tao and Prof. JI Wei from Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a new interferometric single molecule localization microscopy with fast modulated structured illumination which named Repetitive Optical Selective Exposure (ROSE).
High-fat diets affect your brain, not just your physical appearance
Much research has pointed to how an unhealthy diet correlates to obesity, but has not explored how diet can bring about neurological changes in the brain.
Factors associated with longer wait times in colorectal cancer specialty care referrals
Delay in referral to specialty care for patients who have symptoms of colorectal cancer may lead to poor health outcomes.
The ever-winning lottery ticket: Mathematicians solve a dusty mystery
After years of work, University of Copenhagen mathematics researchers have answered a mysterious half-century-old riddle.
Preventing the onset of schizophrenia in mouse model
Although predisposing processes occur earlier, schizophrenia breaks out at young adulthood, suggesting it might involve a pathological transition during late brain development in predisposed individuals.
New research from Alkema lab shows how stress can weaken defenses
Research from the lab of Mark Alkema, Ph.D., at UMass Medical School, shows how a dynamic regulation of a stress neurohormone regulates the trade-off between acute and long-term stress responses.
Scientists isolate protective proteins that influence outcomes for type 2 diabetes
Scientists from the School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, have, for the first time, discovered a family of proteins that are associated with lower blood sugar levels among obese patients with type 2 diabetes, implying that those proteins are associated with a better control of the patient's disease.
Researchers show satellite data can reveal fire susceptibility in peatlands
Fires in Southeast Asian peatlands release huge amounts of carbon, along with deadly smoke.
Durvalumab combined with chemotherapy improves overall survival in patients with lung cancer
Adding immunotherapy in the form of durvalumab to chemotherapy improves overall survival in patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer, according to research presented today at the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).
NASA finds Gabrielle's strength on its northern side
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean and provided a visible view of Tropical Storm Gabrielle that helped pinpoint its strongest side.
Study shows shorter people are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes
Short stature is associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes).Tall stature is associated with a lower risk, with each 10cm difference in height associated with a 41% decreased risk of diabetes in men and a 33% decreased risk in women.
One-atom switch supercharges fluorescent dyes
A Rice lab develops a single-atom switch to turn fluorescent dyes used in biological imaging on and off at will.
HIV significantly increases risk for irregular heartbeat
HIV infection significantly increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) -- one of the most important causes of irregular heartbeats and a leading cause of stroke -- at the same rate or higher than known risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Sound-shape associations depend on early visual experiences
Data from individuals with different types of severe visual impairment suggest that the associations we make between sounds and shapes -- a 'smooth' b or a 'spiky' k -- may form during a sensitive period of visual development in early childhood.
Tweets indicate nicotine dependence, withdrawal symptoms of JUUL users
As e-cigarette brand JUUL continues to climb in popularity among users of all ages, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers took a unique approach to analyzing its impact by using Twitter to investigate any mention of nicotine effects, symptoms of dependence and withdrawal in regards to JUUL use.
Making and controlling crystals of light
EPFL scientists have shown how light inside optical on-chip microresonators can be crystallized in a form of periodic pulse trains that can boost the performance of optical communication links or endow ultrafast LiDAR with sub-micron precision.
Rocks at asteroid impact site record first day of dinosaur extinction
The research centers on the asteroid impact that wiped out non-avian dinosaurs, with the researchers getting the most detailed look yet of the aftermath that followed by examining the rocks and debris that filled the crater within the first 24 hours after impact.
ENT researchers showcase studies at Otolaryngology's Annual Meeting
The most current research on head and neck cancer, cochlear implants, techniques in tonsillectomies, opioid prescribing patterns, residency matching, and other topics related to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be presented in New Orleans, LA, September 15-18, 2019, during the 2019 Annual Meeting & OTO Experience of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation.
An oral splint that can reduce Tourette syndrome tics
Osaka University researchers developed a new device that ameliorates the characteristic vocal and motor tics of Tourette syndrome.
Link between gut microbes & muscle growth suggests future approach to tackle muscle loss
Scientists led by NTU Singapore's Professor Sven Pettersson established a link between gut microbes and muscle growth and function -- a finding that could open new doors to interventions for age-related skeletal muscle loss.
Identity crisis for fossil beetle helps rewrite beetle family tree
A tiny fossil beetle, about the size of FDR's nose on the US dime, is a totally different species than scientists thought it was, meaning that the beetle family tree needs a rewrite.
At-home dialysis improves quality of life
The rate of people starting voluntary at-home peritoneal dialysis rose from 15% to 34% over 10 years at Kaiser Permanente in Northern California, providing a convenient and safe way to manage advanced-stage kidney disease compared with center-based hemodialysis, according to research published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.
Use of antibiotics in preemies has lasting, potentially harmful effects
Nearly all babies born prematurely receive antibiotics. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Strong student-adult relationships lower suicide attempts in high schools
Study of social networks in 38 high schools shows evidence that clearly identified, competent adult mentors that are connected to many students can help prevent suicide attempts.
Spintronics: Physicists discover new material for highly efficient data processing
A new material could aid in the development of extremely energy efficient IT applications.
Women's deep belly fat more strongly linked to diabetes and cardiovascular diseases
A comprehensive study from Uppsala University, with over 325,000 participants, shows that deep belly fat is a major contributing risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
Uncovering a new aspect of charge density modulations in high temperature superconductors
Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and Politecnico di Milano have identified a crucial new aspect of charge density modulations in cuprate high critical temperature superconductors.
New results on fungal genetics
An international team of researchers has found unusual genetic features in fungi of the order Trichosporonales.
Protein mapping pinpoints why metastatic melanoma patients do not respond to immunotherapy
Tel Aviv University and Sheba Medical Center researchers say they have discovered why more than half of patients with metastatic melanoma do not respond to immunotherapy cancer treatments.
Study supports germline testing for all metastatic breast cancer patients
Genetic testing for all metastatic breast cancer patients may be an optimal strategy for identifying additional patients with increased risk as well as response to targeted therapies, according to research published in JAMA Oncology.
Researchers describe the epigenetic fingerprints everyday experiences leave in neurons
An international study led by researchers from the Instituto de Neurosciencias, UMH-CSIC in Alicante presents a novel multi-omic analysis of the changes in the organization of the genetic material of neurons triggered by neuronal activation both in a pathological (epilepsy) and in a physiological context (learning and memory).
WVU researcher finds link between deprivation and rural suicide rates
WVU researcher John Campo is examining ways to improve suicide prevention.
Lack of reporting on phosphorus supply chain dangerous for global food security
A new study from Stockholm University and University of Iceland shows that while Phosphorus is a key element to global food security, its supply chain is a black box.
Prolonged antibiotic treatment may alter preterm infants' microbiome
Treating preterm infants with antibiotics for more than 20 months appears to promote the development of multidrug-resistant gut bacteria, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Blood test shows promise to aid better detection of lung cancer
Lung cancer can be spotted earlier and diagnosed more precisely with the help of a blood test.
Bias against single people affects their cancer treatment
New research reveals the dangerous bias that's been buried in the fine print of academic and medical journals for more than 30 years.
Researchers identify negative impacts of food insecurity on children's health
A new paper by researchers at the Boston University School of Social Work and American University's School of Public Affairs confirms the negative impact of food insecurity on child health, suggesting the urgent need for policies to combat this problem.
Number of pregnant women with high blood pressure spiked over last four decades
The number of women with high blood pressure when they become pregnant or who have it diagnosed during the first 20 weeks of pregnancy has spiked in the United States since 1979.
Scientists establish new way to test for drug resistant infections
Scientists from the University of York have modified an antibiotic from the beta-lactam family so that it can be attached to a sensor, enabling them to detect the presence of bacteria resistant to treatment.
Ages of the Navajo Sandstone
The real Jurassic Park was as an ancient landscape home to a vast desert covered mostly in sand dunes as far as the eye could see, where dinosaurs and small mammals roamed southern Utah.
Ash tree species likely will survive emerald ash borer beetles, but just barely
'Lingering ash.' That's what the US Forest Service calls the relatively few green and white ash trees that survive the emerald ash borer onslaught.
New app offers faster and easier assessment for multiple sclerosis
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have developed and validated a tablet-based app that offers a faster, easier and more accurate way for health care providers who don't have specialized training to assess the cognitive function of people with multiple sclerosis (MS).
Lung cancer screening model favored in Europe detects more cancers than 1 preferred in the US
Researchers reported today that a prospective trial comparing 2 screening methods for at-risk lung cancer patients found that a model used by Canadian, Australian and European public health organizations detected more cancers than the screening model used by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).
Online crowdfunding to pay for cancer care
This research letter examined crowdfunding efforts to defray expenses associated with cancer care.
NASA finds Tropical Storm Faxai's heavy rainmaking storms off-shore from Japan
The big island of Japan received Tropical Storm Faxai and NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center infrared data and cloud top temperature information that revealed the most powerful storms just off-shore when the satellite flew overhead.
Major gaps exist in patient understanding of genomic test results, Lung-MAP study shows
A majority of cancer patients don't understand key aspects of the genomic test results they receive as participants in biomarker-driven clinical trials, according to a first-of-its-kind pilot study conducted under the Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP).
Why don't the drugs work? Controlling inflammation can make antidepressants more effective
Research shows that controlling inflammation may be key to helping the brain develop the flexibility to respond to antidepressant drugs, potentially opening the way for treatment for many millions of people who do not respond to the drugs.
New guideline on Parkinson's disease aimed at physicians and people with Parkinson's
A comprehensive new Canadian guideline provides practical guidance for physicians, allied health professionals, patients and families on managing Parkinson disease, based on the latest evidence.
Village women prove effective at tackling Indonesia's growing killer
Women from villages in rural Indonesia are playing a key role in detecting and preventing the most common cause of death in Indonesia, cardiovascular disease, with the use of smart phones.
Registrational data from LIBRETTO-001 trial
Selpercatinib was granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation by the US Food & Drug Administration in 2018 after initial data from the clinical trial LOXO-292 Investigated to Block RET-altered Tumors (LIBRETTO-001) showed the therapy demonstrated robust anti-tumor activity in a group of RET fusion-positive non small cell lung cancer patients, as well as strong evidence of durability.
Salk scientists develop technique to reveal epigenetic features of cells in the brain
Salk researchers combined two different analysis techniques into one method, to simultaneously analyze how chromosomes, along with their epigenetic features, are compacted inside of single human brain cells.
Study identifies first potential biomarker for a debilitating fainting condition
Nearly 90% of those in the largest-to-date study of patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome had elevated levels of a specific autoantibody.
Tiny capsules offer alternative to viral delivery of gene therapy
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have packed a gene-editing payload into a tiny customizable, synthetic nanocapsule.
Experimental 'blood test' accurately screens for PTSD
An artificial intelligence tool confirmed with 77% accuracy a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in male combat veterans.
Lightning 'superbolts' form over oceans from November to February
Lightning superbolts -- which unleash a thousand times more low-frequency energy than regular lightning bolts -- occur in dramatically different patterns than regular lightning, according to a new, nine-year survey of these rare events.
New flying reptile species was one of largest ever flying animals
A newly identified species of pterosaur is among the largest ever flying animals, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.
A 'super-cool' method for improving donated liver preservation
A new method for super-cooling human donor livers to subzero centigrade temperatures without freezing can triple the time that a donor organ stays safe and viable during transportation from the donor to the recipient.
Are black holes made of dark energy?
Two University of Hawaii at Manoa researchers have identified and corrected a subtle error that was made when applying Einstein's equations to model the growth of the universe.

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.