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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | September 11, 2019


Can a high-tech sniffer help keep us safe?
Science stinks. So thought Megan Harries as she measured drops of putrescine and cadaverine -- the chemicals that give decomposing corpses their distinctive, terrible odor -- into glass vials.
Geologists found links between deep sea methane emissions and ice ages
Since 2012, researchers at the Division of Bedrock Geology in the Department of Geology of Tallinn University of Technology Aivo Lepland and Tõnu Martma have been engaged in the research of an international research group investigating the factors controlling methane seepages and reconstructing the chronology of past methane emissions in one of the world's most climate-sensitive regions -- the Barents Sea in the Arctic.
Only a fraction of the costs of excessive drinking are paid for by alcohol taxes
The total harm caused by excessive alcohol consumption is a staggering $2.05 per drink in the United States, and, of this, the government ends up paying about $0.80 per drink.
Why young females with obesity are at early risk for cardiovascular disease
In the face of obesity, the sex hormone progesterone that helps females get and stay pregnant appears to also put them at increased, early risk for cardiovascular disease, investigators report.
Microbial profile to support growing field of human gut research
George Washington University researchers published a comprehensive list of the types and ratios of microbes that inhabit the healthy human gut in PLOS ONE.
Some cancer drugs in clinical trials don't work by hitting their targets
Multiple cancer drug candidates in clinical trials kill tumor cells through off-target effects instead of by interacting with their intended molecular targets, according to a new study.
Since cooling demand is primarily driven by the sun, could it also be powered by the sun?
The International Energy Agency has dubbed increased global cooling demand as one of the most critical blind spots in today's energy debate.
Graphene sets the stage for the next generation of THz astronomy detectors
Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology have demonstrated a detector made from graphene that could revolutionize the sensors used in next-generation space telescopes.
Opioid treatment for teens? Medications can help
Teens who misuse prescription or illicit opioids might benefit from opioid treatment medications, according to a new study led by a Yale researcher.
Teens with opioid use disorder may benefit from medication treatment
Although the effectiveness of medications to treat adults with opioid use disorder has been well established, there has been little research about how -- or even if -- such treatment works in adolescents.
Scientists identify gene as master regulator in schizophrenia
Using computational tools to investigate gene transcription networks in large collections of brain tissues, a scientific team has identified a gene that acts as a master regulator of schizophrenia during early human brain development.
370 healthcare groups send letter to congress urging prior authorization reform in medicare advantage
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR), along with 369 other leading patient, physician, and healthcare professional organizations, sent a letter to Congress urging passage of the Improving Seniors' Timely Access to Care Act of 2019 (H.R.
Chameleon inspires 'smart skin' that changes color in the sun
Chemists used photonic crystals to develop a flexible smart skin that reacts to heat and sunlight while maintaining a near constant volume.
Study: Want more investors to your startup? Better make an impassioned pitch
The brains of potential investors are wired to pay closer attention to entrepreneurs who pitch with passion, according to new research from Case Western Reserve University.
Flexible solar cells a step closer to reality
Solar cells that use mixtures of organic molecules to absorb sunlight and convert it to electricity, that can be applied to curved surfaces such as the body of a car, could be a step closer thanks to a discovery that challenges conventional thinking about one of the key components of these devices.
A Goldilocks zone for planet size
Harvard University researchers described a new, lower size limit for planets to maintain surface liquid water for long periods of time, extending the so-called Habitable or 'Goldilocks'' Zone for small, low-gravity planets.
Soil scientist researches nature versus nurture in microorganisms
Ember Morrissey, assistant professor of environmental microbiology at West Virginia University, uncovered that nature significantly affects how the tiny organisms under our feet respond to their current surroundings.
Exercising while restricting calories could be bad for bone health
UNC School of Medicine's Maya Styner, MD, led research showing that the combination of cutting calories and exercising can make bones smaller and more fragile in animals, whereas exercise on a full-calorie diet has a positive impact on bone health.
Conductivity at the edges of graphene bilayers
For nanoribbons of bilayer graphene, whose edge atoms are arranged in zigzag patterns, the bands of electron energies which are allowed and forbidden are significantly different to those found in monolayer graphene.
Olfactory and auditory stimuli change the perception of our body
A pioneering investigation developed by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) alongside the University of Sussex and University College London, shows that olfactory stimuli combined with auditory stimuli can change our perception of our body.
Corn one step closer to bacterial leaf streak resistance
Bacterial leaf streak, a foliar disease in corn, has only been in the United States for a handful of years, but Tiffany Jamann says it's a major problem in the Western Corn Belt.
New metamaterial morphs into new shapes, taking on new properties
Electrochemical reactions drive shape change in new nanoarchitected metamaterial.
Is time spent using social media associated with mental health problems among adolescents?
Adolescents who spend more than three hours a day using social media may be at higher risk for mental health problems.
From years to days: Artificial Intelligence speeds up photodynamics simulations
The prediction of molecular reactions triggered by light is to date extremely time-consuming and therefore costly.
New research warns incentives to plead guilty can undermine the right to a fair trial
New research suggests that the right to a fair trial can be undermined by benefits associated with pleading guilty, and that such benefits are putting pressure on vulnerable defendants to admit to crimes they did not commit.
Calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss in Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia but the changes in brain cell function underlying memory loss remains poorly understood.
How long does a whale feed? New data gives insight into blue and fin whale behavior
Researchers using electronic tags were able to monitor blue and fin whales off the coast of Southern California over multiple weeks, providing new insight into the feeding behaviors of the two largest whale species.
Focusing on key sustainable development goals would boost progress across all, analysis finds
The world could make greater progress towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals by prioritizing a subset of the goals rather than pursuing them all equally, a first-of-its-kind mathematical study reveals.
Nuclear physics -- probing a nuclear clock transition
Physicists have measured the energy associated with the decay of a metastable state of the thorium-229 nucleus.
'Game-changing' research could solve evolution mysteries
An evolution revolution has begun after scientists extracted genetic information from a 1.7-million-year-old rhino tooth -- the largest and oldest genetic data to ever be recorded.
Giant balloon-like structures discovered at center of Milky Way
An international team of astronomers, including Northwestern University's Farhad Yusef-Zadeh, has discovered one of the largest structures ever observed in the Milky Way.
NASA's Hubble finds water vapor on habitable-zone exoplanet for 1st time
With data from the Hubble Space Telescope, water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere of a super-Earth with habitable temperatures.
Researchers explore the many factors impacting the pH of dicamba spray mixtures
The EPA now requires new dicamba formulations registered for dicamba-resistant crops to have a pH of 5.0 or higher because of volatility and off-target damage concerns.
First water detected on potentially 'habitable' planet
Water vapour has been detected in the atmosphere of a super-Earth with habitable temperatures by UCL researchers in a world first.
Increasing number of adolescents receive depression diagnosis
The proportion of young people in Finland diagnosed with depression in specialised services is increasing, showed a study based on an extensive set of national data.
Cell-mostly internet users place privacy burden on themselves
Do data privacy concerns disproportionately affect people who access the internet primarily through cell phones?
A smart artificial hand for amputees merges user and robotic control
EPFL scientists have successfully tested new neuroprosthetic technology that combines robotic control with users' voluntary control, opening avenues in the new interdisciplinary field of shared control for neuroprosthetic technologies.
Public support for gene drives in agriculture tied to limits
The first national survey inquiring about American attitudes toward agricultural gene drives shows more support for systems that are limited in scope and aimed at non-native insects.
It's all a blur.....why stripes hide moving prey
Scientists at Newcastle University have shown that patterns -- particularly stripes which are easy to spot when an animal is still -- can also help conceal speeding prey.
Giant kangaroo had crushing bites
An in-depth analysis of the skull biomechanics of a giant extinct kangaroo demonstrates that the animal had a capacity for high-performance crushing of foods, suggesting feeding behaviors more similar to a giant panda than a modern-day kangaroo.
Predictable eSports: Amateurs and professionals sit differently on a chair
A group of scientists from Skoltech's Computational and Data-Intensive Science and Engineering Center (CDISE) won the Best Paper Award at the prestigious 5th IEEE Internet of People conference (IoP 2019) for their research in artificial intelligence which helped them find a connection between an eSports player's movements and skill level.
Electrical-first cardioversion strategy for AFib results in shorter ED length of stay
A multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial confirms that both chemical-first and electrical-first approaches are effective strategies for acute atrial fibrillation; however, an electrical-first strategy results in a significantly shorter emergency department (ED) length of stay.
New study examines how species colonize habitats opened by anthropogenic land cover change
As plants expand into new open habitats, geographical and climatic factors may matter more than species-specific traits, according to a study published September 11, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Miki Nomura of the University of Otago in New Zealand, and colleagues.
A diabetes drug promotes brain repair -- but it only works in females
Study finds that the diabetes drug metformin, known to promote brain repair, can also help restore cognitive function in adult mice but only in females and in a way that is dependent on the sex hormone estradiol.
Cancer drugs don't always work as intended, researchers warn
CSHL researchers have shown that 10 different cancer drugs being given to about 1,000 human patients in clinical trials kill cancer in entirely different ways than previously thought.
UK improves cancer survival, but is still behind other high-income countries
Cancer survival in the UK has improved since 1995, although it still lags behind other high-income countries, according to new analysis by the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP), which is managed by Cancer Research UK.
Talking receptors may affect relaxin at work
A research team investigating the promising anti-fibrotic effects of a drug version of the hormone, relaxin, has discovered that the receptor through which it mediates its therapeutic actions can communicate and/or interact with other receptors in cells that contribute to fibrosis progression.
Can a DNA construction kit replace expensive antibody medication?
Researchers at KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a technique to make sheep produce new antibodies simply by injecting the DNA building blocks.
It takes a 'consortium': Researchers develop metabolic engineering technique
For years, scientists have explored ways to alter the cells of microorganisms in efforts to improve how many products are made, including medicines, fuels, and even beer.
Mako shark tracking off west coast reveals 'impressive' memory and navigation
The largest effort ever to tag and track shortfin mako sharks off the West Coast has found that they can travel nearly 12,000 miles in a year.
Brain: How to optimize decision making?
Our brains are constantly faced with different choices. Why is it so difficult to make up our mind when faced with two or more choices?
A precise chemical fingerprint of the Amazon
This novel drone-based chemical monitoring system tracks the health of the Amazon in the face of global climate change and human-caused deforestation and burning.
Burying beetle larvae know the best time to beg for food
It's easy to imagine an adult bird standing over youngsters with mouths open wide for a pre-mashed meal.
Topography could save sensitive saguaros as climate changes
By studying nearly five decades of data on more than 5,800 saguaros dotting Tumamoc Hill, researchers found that small variations in the hill's topography might buffer saguaro populations from the impacts of climate change.
Solving the longstanding mystery of how friction leads to static electricity
A Northwestern University team developed a new model, which shows that rubbing two objects together produces static electricity, or triboelectricity, by bending the tiny protrusions on the surface of materials.
Ground-breaking method to reconstruct the evolution of all species
By looking into fossil teeth from almost 2 million years old rhinos, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Cambridge launch a new molecular method for studying the evolutionary history of fossil species dating back millions of years.
Early humans used tiny, flint 'surgical' tools to butcher elephants
A new Tel Aviv University-led study reveals that the early humans known as Acheulians crafted tiny flint tools out of recycled larger discarded instruments as part of a comprehensive animal-butchery tool kit.
Meet the molecule that helps stressed cells decide between life and death
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a molecule that plays a pivotal role in determining the fate of cells under stress, much like a Roman emperor deciding the fate of gladiators in the coliseum.
Poor motor skills predict long-term language impairments for children with autism
Fine motor skills - used for eating, writing and buttoning clothing - may be a strong predictor for identifying whether children with autism are at risk for long-term language disabilities, according to a Rutgers-led study.
Microplastics stunt growth of worms -- study
New research shows that the presence of microplastics can stunt the growth of earthworms, and even cause them to lose weight -- potentially having a serious impact on the soil ecosystem.
Advanced breeding paves the way for disease-resistant beans
ETH researchers are involved in the development and implementation of a method to efficiently breed for disease-resistant beans in different regions of the world.
Towering balloon-like features discovered near center of the Milky Way
An international team of astronomers has discovered one of the largest features ever observed in the center of the Milky Way -- a pair of enormous radio-emitting bubbles that tower hundreds of light-years above and below the central region of our galaxy.
Trump administration's public charge rule presents threat to health, conclude scholars
The Trump administration's 'public charge' rule, which would subject legal immigrants to a public charge determination if they use public health, nutrition and housing benefits for which they are eligible, represents a major threat to health, according to a 'friend of the court' brief filed Sept.
Understanding gut bacteria: forces for good (and sometimes evil)
In a paper published in PLOS ONE, a multi-institutional research team led by George Washington University found 157 different kinds of organisms (eight phyla, 18 classes, 23 orders, 38 families, 59 genera and 109 species) living inside the guts of healthy volunteers.
Water detected on an exoplanet located in its star's habitable zone
An international study lead by UdeM astronomer Björn Benneke has detected water vapor on the planet K2-18b; this represents a major discovery in the search of alien life.
Climate change: A dirt-y business
Groundwater is essential for growing crops, but new research shows climate change is making it harder for soil to absorb water from rainfall.
Bioengineers explore cardiac tissue remodeling after aortic valve replacement procedures
Researchers have developed biomaterial-based 'mimics' of heart tissues to measure patients' responses to an aortic valve replacement procedure, offering new insight into the ways that cardiac tissue re-shapes itself post-surgery.
Study shows cost savings from same-day long-acting reversible contraception
According to a new study by Indiana University School of Medicine doctors, providing adolescents seeking birth control the ability to obtain a long-acting reversible contraceptive on the same day as their clinic visit could lead to significant cost savings for insurance providers.
Social media use by adolescents linked to internalizing behaviors
A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that adolescents who spend more than three hours a day on social media are more likely to report high levels of internalizing behaviors compared to adolescents who do not use social media at all.
Gene mutation, tissue location, signaling networks drive cancer incidence and severity
Mutated KRAS genes are commonly found in several cancers and not all KRAS mutations in the same organ tissue cause the same disease severity, according to three new studies from researchers at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
Genetic discovery linked to rare eye disease, MacTel
Paul S. Bernstein, M.D., Ph.D., spent more than a decade working with families at the John A.
Nerve-like 'optical lace' gives robots a human touch
A new synthetic material that creates a linked sensory network similar to a biological nervous system could enable soft robots to sense how they interact with their environment and adjust their actions accordingly.
Black hole at the center of our galaxy appears to be getting hungrier
The enormous black hole at the center of our galaxy is having an unusually large meal, and researchers don't know why.
Professor's research paints picture of #MeToo movement's origins
San Francisco State University Assistant Professor of Economics Sepideh Modrek studies tweets sent during the first week of the #MeToo movement to understand its magnitude.
'Death Star' bacterial structures that inject proteins can be tapped to deliver drugs
Not all bacteria spread diseases, many are beneficial and this strain has nanoscale syringes that deliver proteins which cause metamorphosis in marine animals, and could be modified as a novel drug delivery tool for future vaccines and cancer care.
Type 2 diabetes is not just about insulin
Obesity, by promoting the resistance to the action of insulin, is a major risk factor of diabetes.
New study points to universal code in our brains for what we find beautiful
A network in the human brain involved in inner thoughts and self-referential mental processing may contain a universal code for whether we find something to be beautiful.
UBC study finds health isn't the only issue with bacteria growth
Microorganisms growing inside aging buildings and infrastructure are more than just a health issue, according to new research from UBC Okanagan.
Sandia experiments at temperature of sun offer solutions to solar model problems
The theoretical model that astrophysicists have used for 40 years to determine the behavior and future of the sun is broken.
Brain changes may help track dementia, even before diagnosis
Even before a dementia diagnosis, people with mild cognitive impairment may have different changes in the brain depending on what type of dementia they have, according to a study published in the September 11, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Aphid-stressed pines show different secondary organic aerosol formation
Plants emit gases, called volatile organic compounds (VOCs), that enter the atmosphere, where they can interact with other natural and human-made molecules to form secondary organic aerosols (SOAs).
Milestones on the way to the nuclear clock
For decades, people have been searching for suitable atomic nuclei for building an ultra-precise nuclear clock.
Half-a-billion-year-old tiny predator unveils the rise of scorpions and spiders
Two palaeontologists working on the world-renowned Burgess Shale have revealed a new species, called Mollisonia plenovenatrix, which is presented as the oldest chelicerate.
Towering balloon-like features discovered near centre of the Milky Way
An international team of astronomers including members from the University of Oxford, has discovered one of the largest features ever observed in the center of the Milky Way: a pair of enormous radio-emitting bubbles that tower hundreds of light-years above and below the central region of our galaxy.
Study of newly homeless ED patients finds multiple contributors to homelessness
A qualitative study of recently homeless emergency department (ED) patients found multiple contributors to homelessness that can inform future homelessness prevention interventions.
Dynamic reorganization of brain circuit with post-stroke rehabilitation
Nagoya City University researchers have revealed an interaction between cortico-brainstem pathways during training-induced recovery in stroke model rats.
'Flying fish' robot can propel itself out of water and glide through the air
A bio-inspired bot uses water from the environment to create a gas and launch itself from the water's surface.
Are we prepared for a new era of field geology on the moon and beyond?
Space agencies must invest more resources on field geology training of astronauts to take full advantage of scientific opportunities on the moon and other planetary bodies, Kip Hodges and Harrison Schmitt urge, in an Editorial.
Infant with deadly leukemia saved by drug for adult liver cancer
Doctors at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals have successfully treated an infant with a rare childhood leukemia using a targeted therapy approved for adults with inoperable liver cancer and advanced kidney cancer.
Initial steps to compile a healthy human gut microbiome reference database underway
An initial baseline healthy gut microbiome database and abundance profile is described in a study published September 11, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Charles Hadley King from George Washington University Medical Center, USA, and colleagues.
Conserving rare species for the maintenance of Mediterranean forests
This study has shown the importance of conserving rare species for the maintenance of complex ecosystems like Mediterranean forests.
CAR T-cell therapy may be harnessed to treat heart disease
CAR T-cell therapy, a rapidly emerging form of immunotherapy using patients' own cells to treat certain types of cancers, may be a viable treatment option for another life-threatening condition: heart disease.
Gene therapy helps functional recovery after stroke
A new gene therapy turns glial cells -- abundant support cells in the brain -- into neurons, repairing damage that results from stroke and significantly improving motor function in mice.
First 'overtones' heard in the ringing of a black hole
By listening for specific tones in the gravitational waves of black hole mergers, researchers are putting Albert Einstein's theories to new tests.
Sulphur emissions from marine algae dropped during glacial periods
Contrary to conventional wisdom, sulphur production by tiny marine algae decreased during glacial periods, and is more closely linked to climate than previously thought, according to latest research by scientists in Japan.
Insects as food and feed: research and innovation drive growing field
As the global food supply faces the dual challenge of climate change and a growing human population, innovative minds are turning to a novel source for potential solutions: insects.
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes.
A curiosity-driven genetic discovery that should impact cancer treatments
A team of geneticists with a desire to understand the inner workings of genes implicated in cellular identity has discovered new biological targets that may help devise alternative therapies for cancers that are becoming resistant to existing drugs.
Supporting menstruating girls: Are we making progress?
Attention to menstruation and its relationship to girls' schooling is gaining ground, yet many challenges remain.
Cancer research -- The genetic context is crucial
An Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team has uncovered a mechanism behind the variability in the clinical course of Ewing sarcoma.
Research tracks narcissism from young adulthood to middle age
The belief that one is smarter, better looking, more successful and more deserving than others -- a personality trait known as narcissism -- tends to wane as a person matures, a new study confirms.
A chameleon-inspired smart skin changes color in the sun
Some creatures, such as chameleons and neon tetra fish, can alter their colors to camouflage themselves, attract a mate or intimidate predators.
Malaria could be felled by an Antarctic sea sponge
The frigid waters of the Antarctic may yield a treatment for a deadly disease that affects populations in some of the hottest places on earth.
Hoary bat numbers declining at rate that suggests species in jeopardy in Pacific Northwest
The hoary bat, the species of bat most frequently found dead at wind power facilities, is declining at a rate that threatens its long-term future in the Pacific Northwest, according to a novel and comprehensive research collaboration.
Biology of bat wings may hold lessons for cold-weather work, exercise
The muscles in bats' wings are much cooler than the muscles in their core, a new study finds -- and this research could one day enhance our understanding of human muscle.
Discovering biological mechanisms enabling pianists to achieve skillful fingering
Japanese researchers discovered a sensorimotor function integration mechanism that enables the skillful fingering of pianists.
Papillomaviruses may be able to be spread by blood
Researchers found that rabbit and mouse papillomaviruses could be transferred by blood to their respective hosts, raising the possibility that human papillomavirus (HPV) may also be transferable by blood in humans.
Long before other fish, ancient sharks found an alternative way to feed
Researchers from the University of Chicago have used tools developed to explore 3D movements and mechanics of modern-day fish jaws to analyze a fossil fish for the first time.
Scientists detect the ringing of a newborn black hole for the first time
Physicists from MIT and elsewhere have 'heard' the ringing of an infant black hole for the first time, and found that the pattern of this ringing does, in fact, predict the black hole's mass and spin -- more evidence that Einstein was right all along.
University of Minnesota research discovers inhibitor to reverse toxic DUX4 effects
New University of Minnesota Medical School research identifies an inhibitor that protects cells from toxic effects associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy in cells and mice.
AI neural network detects heart failure from single heartbeat
Researchers have developed a neural network approach that can accurately identify congestive heart failure with 100% accuracy through analysis of just one raw electrocardiogram (ECG) heartbeat, a new study reports.
Research on the good life
In recent decades, the centrally planned socialist economy in countries such as Laos, China, and Vietnam has been replaced by a market economy that remains under the political rule of the Communist party.
Digital records of preserved plants and animals change how scientists explore the world
There's a whole world behind the scenes at natural history museums that most people never see -- millions upon millions of dinosaur bones, pickled sharks, dried leaves, and every other part of the natural world.These specimens are used in research by scientists trying to understand how different kinds of life evolved and how we can protect them.
Shoppers more likely to pay for upgrades when extra cost is an 'add-on,' study finds
Shoppers are up to one-third more likely to shell out for the premium option when the extra cost is expressed as an add-on, as opposed to a higher overall price, according to new research from the UBC Sauder School of Business.
Female gorillas detect and avoid sick groups
Gorillas are social animals, living in groups that females will migrate to join, becoming members of harems.
Study examines FDA drug, device approvals based on nonrandomized clinical trials
How often the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved drugs and devices based on nonrandomized clinical trials (non-RCTs) and whether those approvals are associated with the sizes of treatment effects were the focus of this study.
How can we feed the world without overwhelming the planet?
Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2 calls for ending hunger, achieving food security and improved nutrition, and promoting sustainable agriculture.
Scientists solve lingering mystery of poorly understood frog
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at McMaster University, has solved a centuries-old mystery of 'Fraser's Clawed Frog', an unusual and elusive species found in West Africa.
Gender identity conversion efforts associated with adverse mental health outcomes
Gender identity conversion efforts to try to change a person's gender identity to match their sex assigned at birth were associated with increased likelihood of adverse mental health outcomes, including suicide attempts, in this study of nearly 28,000 transgender adults from across the United States.
Breeders release new flaxseed cultivar with higher yield
The crop has many uses as plant-based food and fiber.
Soils could be affected by climate change, impacting water and food
Coasts, oceans, ecosystems, weather and human health all face impacts from climate change, and now valuable soils may also be affected.
Does association of frailty, increased risk of death waiting for liver transplant differ by BMI?
This observational study examined among liver transplant candidates whether the association of frailty and increased risk of death while on the waiting list for a transplant varied by body mass index.
Deworming programmes for soil-transmitted helminths -- a Cochrane review update
Should global government and philanthropic aid be invested in large public health deworming programmes in low- and middle-income countries?
Little heaps of silver, all wrapped up
Nanoclusters are little 'heaps' of a few atoms that often have interesting optical properties and could become useful probes for imaging processes in areas such as biomedicine and diagnostics.
What is risk of new long-term opioid use among patients with Hidradenitis suppurtiva?
Hidradenitis suppurativa is a painful skin condition where lumps form under the skin.
SDSU professors examine what influences healthy, sustainable food choices
A team of marketing professors at the Fowler College of Business at San Diego State University have studied the sensory impact of food and the evolution of healthy eating.
FDA phase 1 trial shows hydrogel to repair heart is safe to inject in humans -- a first
Ventrix, a University of California San Diego spin-off company, has successfully conducted a first-in-human, FDA-approved Phase 1 clinical trial of an injectable hydrogel that aims to repair damage and restore cardiac function in heart failure patients who previously suffered a heart attack.
Students make neutrons dance beneath UC Berkeley campus
Nuclear reactors are still the primary source for strong neutron beams to create isotopes for geologic dating, radiography and medicine, but researchers at UC Berkeley have enlisted engineering students in building a tabletop neutron source that could be nearly as effective.
Standardized medical residency exam may reduce pool of diverse and qualified candidates
Test scores bias entry to radiation-oncology residency programs, and potentially other programs.

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