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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 15, 2019


Obesity linked to a nearly 6-fold increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with genetics and lifestyle also raising risk
Obesity is linked to a nearly 6-fold increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), with high genetic risk and unfavorable lifestyle also increasing risk but to a much lesser extent.
Scanning the lens of the eye could predict type 2 diabetes and prediabetes
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain, (Sept.
Antibiotic resistance surges in dolphins, mirroring humans
Scientists obtained a total of 733 pathogen isolates from 171 individual wild Bottlenose dolphins in Florida and found that the overall prevalence of resistance to at least one antibiotic for the 733 isolates was 88.2%.
Childhood behavior linked to taking paracetamol in pregnancy
A new study by the University of Bristol adds to evidence that links potential adverse effects of taking paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen) during pregnancy.
Types and rates of co-existing conditions in diabetes are different for men and women
A new study presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.
Latest studies suggest a possible downturn in rate of new cases of diabetes
While overall, the numbers (prevalence) of people with type 2 diabetes continue to grow at an alarming rate, new research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.
Gutsy effort to produce comprehensive study of intestinal gases
UNSW Sydney chemical engineers have traced the journey of gases through the gut while further developing a non-invasive, gas-capturing capsule.
Efficient organic solar cells with a low energy loss enabled by a quinoxaline-based acceptor
Recently, a research team led by Prof. Xiaozhang Zhu from Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has designed and synthesized an electron acceptor AQx by fusing the quinoxaline moiety with the quinoid-resonance effect to the D-A system.
Just bad luck? Cancer patients nominate 'fate' as third most likely cause
What role does fate play when it comes to the 145,000 people diagnosed with cancer each year in Australia and 125,000 people in Vietnam?

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