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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 16, 2019


Finding your niche
Researchers find a new way to explain population differences in personality structure among humans
Just add water
Chemists uncover a mechanism behind doping organic semiconductors
WVU astronomers help detect the most massive neutron star ever measured
West Virginia University researchers have helped discover the most massive neutron star to date, a breakthrough uncovered through the Green Bank Telescope.
Climate change expected to accelerate spread of sometimes-fatal fungal infection
Valley fever is endemic to hot and dry regions like the southwestern United States and California's San Joaquin Valley, but a new study predicts climate change will cause the fungal infection's range to more than double in size this century, reaching previously unaffected areas across the western U.S.
In human cells and mice, a cure for the common cold, Stanford-UCSF study reports
Temporarily disabling a single protein inside our cells might be able to protect us from the common cold and other viral diseases, according to a study led by researchers at Stanford University and University of California-San Francisco.
Short-term study suggests vegan diet can boost gut microbes related to body weight, body composition and blood sugar control
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.
Starting HIV treatment in ERs may be key to ending HIV spread worldwide
In a follow-up study conducted in South Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease.
Eco-friendly method for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles
Environmentally Friendly Way of Synthesizing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Was Developed.
Using smart sensor technology in building design
In today's world, spaces with motion and temperature 'smart sensors' are common and generally improve our overall well-being.
Physicians report high refusal rates for the HPV vaccine and need for improvement
Despite its proven success at preventing cancer, many adolescents are still not getting the HPV vaccine.
Subgroup of colorectal cancer patients ID'd: Do poorly, could benefit from immunotherapy
While the medical community agrees immune cells inside a tumor leads to improved health outcome, for a subset of colorectal cancer patients, having too much of a good thing is a strong predictor of disease recurrence and reduced chances of survival.
Catch-22 in graphene based molecular devices resolved
The conductivity of Graphene has made it a target for many researchers seeking to exploit it to create molecular scale devices and now a research team jointly led by University of Warwick and EMPA have found a way past a frustrating catch 22 issue of stability and reproducibility that meant that graphene based junctions were either mechanically stable or electrically stable but not both at the same time.
Most massive neutron star ever detected, almost too massive to exist
Astronomers using the GBT have discovered the most massive neutron star to date, a rapidly spinning pulsar approximately 4,600 light-years from Earth.
Pre-salvage RT PSA predictive of hormone therapy benefit with salvage RT for recurrent prostate cancer
Initial results of NRG Oncology Clinical Trial RTOG 9601 in men with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer receiving salvage radiotherapy (SRT) demonstrated improvement in OS from the addition of long-term hormone therapy to SRT.
Heart-healthy forager-farmers in lowland Bolivia are changing diets and gaining weight
A group of forager-farmers in Bolivia's tropical forests -- known for having remarkable cardiovascular health and low blood pressure -- experienced changes in body mass and diet over a nine-year period, with increased use of cooking oil being the most notable dietary change.
New research sheds light on how happy couples argue
In marriage, conflict is inevitable. Even the happiest couples argue.
New study shows common carp aquaculture in Neolithic China dating back 8,000 years
In a recent study, an international team of researchers analyzed fish bones excavated from the Early Neolithic Jiahu site in Henan Province, China.
'How We Respond' spotlights how US communities are addressing climate change impacts
Communities across the United States are working with scientists to respond to climate change impacts, shows a new report and multimedia resources developed by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).
A novel tool to probe fundamental matter
The origin of matter remains a complex and open question.
Study: We need more realistic experiments on the impact of climate change on ecosystems
When it comes to the impact of climate change on ecosystems, we still have large knowledge gaps.
The stellar nurseries of distant galaxies
Star clusters are formed by the condensation of molecular clouds.
New imaging technology could 'revolutionize' cancer surgery
Cancer treatment could be dramatically improved by an invention at the University of Waterloo to precisely locate the edges of tumors during surgery to remove them.
One step closer future to quantum computers
Physicists at Uppsala University in Sweden have identified how to distinguish between true and 'fake' Majorana states in one of the most commonly used experimental setups, by means of supercurrent measurements.
Deaths halved among infarct patients attending Heart School
Patients who attend 'Heart School', as almost every patient in Sweden is invited to do after a first heart attack, live longer than non-participating patients.
Algae and bacteria team up to increase hydrogen production
A University of Cordoba research group combined algae and bacteria in order to produce biohydrogen, fuel of the future
Compounds extracted from Cerrado plant combat fungus that causes candidiasis
Four substances isolated from Mimosa caesalpiniifolia were found to be more effective against thrush and candida than was fluconazole.
UCI scientists project northward expansion of Valley fever by end of 21st century
Valley fever is endemic to hot and dry regions such as the southwestern United States and California's San Joaquin Valley, but scientists at the University of California, Irvine predict that climate change will cause the fungal infection's range to more than double in size this century, reaching previously unaffected areas across the western U.S.
Study finds community-oriented policing improves attitudes toward police
A field experiment conducted in New Haven, Conn., found that positive contact with police -- delivered via brief door-to-door nonenforcement community policing visits -- substantially improved residents' attitudes toward police, including legitimacy and willingness to cooperate with law enforcement.
Analysis of studies into alcohol consumption in people with type 2 diabetes suggests
An meta-analysis of studies presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.
Like an instruction manual, the genome groups genes together for convenience
Scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona shed light on how the genome organizes groups of genes linked to specific processes, like the release of toxins.
Misperceptions about racial economic progress are pervasive
The vast majority of Americans underestimate the magnitude of economic inequality between Whites and racial minorities, particularly black and Latinx people, new data indicate.
Immune response depends on mathematics of narrow escapes
The way immune cells pick friends from foes can be described by a classic maths puzzle known as the 'narrow escape problem'.
Hospital-wide use of high-risk antibiotics associated with more C. difficile infections
Higher hospital-wide use of four classes of antibiotics thought to increase the risk of the dangerous intestinal illness Clostridioides difficile were associated with increased prevalence of hospital-associated C. difficile, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
Genetically engineered plasmid can be used to fight antimicrobial resistance
Researchers have engineered a plasmid to remove an antibiotic resistance gene from the Enterococcus faecalis bacterium, an accomplishment that could lead to new methods for combating antibiotic resistance.
For kids who face trauma, good neighbors or teachers can save their longterm health
New research shows just how important positive childhood experiences are for long-term health, especially for those who experience significant adversity as a child.
Hiding in plain sight
Early rice growers unwittingly gave barnyard grass a big hand, helping to give root to a rice imitator that is now considered one of the world's worst agricultural weeds.
New observations help explain the dimming of Tabby's Star
The overall brightness of Tabby's Star has been gradually dimming for years.
Don't make major decisions on an empty stomach, research suggests
A new study from the University of Dundee suggests that people might want to avoid making any important decisions about the future on an empty stomach.
Can sex trafficking be prevented?
The high-profile case of Jeffrey Epstein has shined a light on the reality that minors are being commercially sexually exploited, and that sexual exploitation can happen in any neighborhood, city, state, or country.
Potential target for diabetes-associated Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have identified a protein that may contribute to the progression of Alzheimer's disease pathology in type-2 diabetes, reports a new study of male mice and human brain tissue.
The sleep neuron in threadworms is also a stop neuron
The nervous system of the threadworm C. elegans is simple at first sight: it consists of 302 neurons, some of which, however, have several functions.
New sample holder for protein crystallography
An HZB research team has developed a novel sample holder that considerably facilitates the preparation of protein crystals for structural analysis.
NASA finds Humberto strengthening off the Florida Coast
NASA's Aqua Satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Humberto as it was strengthening off the Florida coast on Sept.
Measuring ethanol's deadly twin
ETH Zurich researchers have developed an inexpensive, handheld measuring device that can distinguish between methanol and potable alcohol.
Reduce, reuse, recycle: The future of phosphorus
Societies celebrate the discovery of this important element in 1669.
Hope for coral recovery may depend on good parenting
USC scientists discover coral pass beneficial algal symbionts to offspring to help them cope with rising ocean temperatures.
3 in 5 parents say their teen has been in a car with a distracted teen driver
More than 1/2 of parents say their child has probably been in an unsafe situation as a passenger with a teen driver.
Meatballs might wreck the anti-cancer perks of tomato sauce
Some of the anti-cancer benefits of tomatoes, specifically those from a compound called lycopene, could disappear when they're eaten with iron-rich foods, according to a new study from The Ohio State University.
Study: Americans would rather drive themselves than have an autonomous vehicle drive them
Are you willing to ride in a driverless car? Researchers at the University of Washington studied how Americans' perceived cost of commute time changes depending on who's driving.
Needle-free flu vaccine patch effective in early study
A new needle-free flu vaccine patch revved up the immune system much like a traditional flu shot without any negative side effects.
Later puberty and later menopause associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women, while use of contraceptive pill and longer time between periods associated with higher risk
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (16-20 Sept) shows that use of the contraceptive pill and longer menstrual cycles are associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), while later puberty and later menopause are associated with lower risk.
Violent video games blamed more often for school shootings by white perpetrators
People are more likely to blame violent video games as a cause of school shootings by white perpetrators than by African-American perpetrators, possibly because of racial stereotypes that associate minorities with violent crime, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.
Lack of sleep affects fat metabolism
A restricted-sleep schedule built to resemble an American work week made study participants feel less full after a fatty meal and altered their lipid metabolism.
Ecologist revives world's longest running succession study
With a grant from National Geographic, CU Denver assistant professor assembled a team to hunt down and expand eight long-forgotten, 103-year-old succession plots.
Off-label medication orders on the rise for children, Rutgers study finds
US physicians are increasingly ordering medications for children for conditions that are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration, according to a Rutgers study.
Meal type and size are the key factors affecting carb-counting in type 1 diabetes
Meal type and size are the most important factors influencing the accuracy of carb-counting for the control of blood sugar in type 1 diabetes, according to new research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.
How common are forced first sexual intercourse experiences among US women?
This study estimates 1 in 16 US women had an unwanted first sexual intercourse experience that was physically forced or coerced.
Optimized placement of defibrillators may improve cardiac arrest outcomes
Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are often placed in areas of low risk and may be unavailable during certain times of the day.
New research identifies a climate signature in rivers globally
For decades geoscientists have been trying to detect the influence of climate on the formation of rivers, but up to now there has been no systematic evidence.
Increased risk of prostate cancer in men with BRCA2 gene fault
Men with the BRCA2 gene fault have an increased risk of prostate cancer and could benefit from PSA (prostate specific antigen) testing to help detect the disease earlier, according to researchers funded by Cancer Research UK.
New route to carbon-neutral fuels from carbon dioxide discovered by Stanford-DTU team
A new way to convert carbon dioxide into the building block for sustainable liquid fuels was very efficient in tests and did not have the reaction that destroys the conventional device.
Army research looks at pearls for clues on enhancing lightweight armor for soldiers
By mimicking the outer coating of pearls (nacre, or as it's more commonly known, mother of pearl), researchers at University at Buffalo, funded by the Army Research Office (ARO), created a lightweight plastic that is 14 times stronger and eight times lighter (less dense) than steel and ideal for absorbing the impact of bullets and other projectiles.
Gene-targeted cancer drugs, slow release overcome resistance
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a method to address failures in a promising anti-cancer drug, bringing together tools from genome engineering, protein engineering and biomaterials to improve the efficacy, accuracy and longevity of certain cancer therapies.
Too much of a good thing: Overactive immune cells trigger inflammation
Scientists describe a previously unknown disorder of the immune system: in a distinct subset of immune cells from patients with primary immunodeficiency, cellular respiration is significantly increased.
Researchers mix RNA and DNA to study how life's process began billions of years ago
RNA World is a fascinating theory, says Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, PhD, an associate professor of chemistry at Scripps Research, but it may not hold true.
Researchers build microscopic biohybrid robots propelled by muscles, nerves
Researchers have developed soft robotic devices driven by neuromuscular tissue that triggers when stimulated by light -- bringing mechanical engineering one step closer to developing autonomous biobots.
Look out, invasive species: The robots are coming
Researchers published the first experiments to gauge whether biomimetic robotic fish can induce fear-related changes in mosquitofish, aiming to discover whether the highly invasive species might be controlled without toxicants or trapping methods harmful to wildlife.
Atlantic Ocean may get a jump-start from the other side of the world
A key question for climate scientists in recent years has been whether the Atlantic Ocean's main circulation system is slowing down, a development that could have dramatic consequences for Europe and other parts of the Atlantic rim.
Community policing and police legitimacy: A field experiment
In a recent study, MIT Sloan Professor David Rand, in collaboration with Kyle Peyton of Yale University and Professor Michael Sierra-Arévalo of the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice, provide the strongest evidence to date in support of the use of Community Oriented Policing (COP).
Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep
The intensity of brain activity during the day, notwithstanding how long we've been awake, appears to increase our need for sleep, according to a new UCL study in zebrafish, published in Neuron.
More than lyme: Tick study finds multiple agents of tick-borne diseases
In a study published in mBio, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology, Jorge Benach and Rafal Tokarz, and their co-authors at Stony Brook University and Columbia University, reported on the prevalence of multiple agents capable of causing human disease that are present in three species of ticks in Long Island.
Study finds virtual reality training could improve employee safety
A new study suggests employee safety could be improved through use of virtual reality (VR) in Health and Safety training, such as fire evacuation drills.
Welcome indoors, solar cells
Swedish and Chinese scientists have developed organic solar cells optimised to convert ambient indoor light to electricity.
Study finds human hearts evolved for endurance
Major physical changes occurred in the human heart as people shifted from hunting and foraging to farming and modern life.
New method reveals how damage occurs in human biological cells due to mechanical fatigue
Researchers have developed a novel way to measure how mechanical fatigue affects biological cells.
Tomorrow's coolants of choice
Later during this century, around 2060, a paradigm shift in global energy consumption is expected: we will spend more energy for cooling than for heating.
For lemurs, sex role reversal may get its start in the womb
In lemur society, it's not males but the females who are in charge.
No difference in pain response between SBRT and conventional RT for patients with spinal metastases
A Phase III, NRG Oncology clinical trial that compared radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to the conventional radiotherapy (cEBRT) for patients with spinal metastases indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between the treatments for pain response, adverse events, FACT-G, BPI, and EQ-5D scores.
How gut bacteria negatively influences blood sugar levels
A world first study reveals how gut bacteria impact blood sugar levels.
New microscopes unravel the mysteries of brain organization
The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today in Nature Methods.
Alzheimer's disease risk gene APOE4 impairs function of brain immune cells
A study carried out with a new human stem cell-derived model reveals that the most prevalent genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4), impairs the function of human brain immune cells, microglia.
Is headache from anesthesia after childbirth associated with risk of bleeding around brain?
This study examined whether postpartum women with headache from anesthesia after neuraxial anesthesia (such as epidural) during childbirth had increased risk of being diagnosed with bleeding around the brain (intracranial subdural hematoma).
Geochemists measure new composition of Earth's mantle
Geochemists have investigated the volcanic rocks that build up the Portuguese island group of the Azores in order to gather new information about the compositional evolution of the Earth's interior.
Large transnational corporations play critical role in global natural resource management
Researchers have identified six corporate actions that, combined with effective public policy and improved governmental regulations, could help large transnational corporations steer environmental stewardship efforts around the world.
Study shows not only do e-cigarette ads influence adolescents, young people don't question them
University of Kansas researchers found that youths who don't smoke reported e-cigarette ads were appealing and memorable, and they accepted the information they presented without question.
Light and sound in silicon chips: The slower the better
Acoustics is a missing dimension in silicon chips because acoustics can complete specific tasks that are difficult to do with electronics and optics alone.
Biological mechanism explained: How lymphoma cells metastasize to the brain
Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center have now discovered which molecular mechanism leads to lymphomas forming metastases in the central nervous system.
New technology allows fleets to double fishing capacity -- and deplete fish stocks faster
Technological advances are allowing commercial fishing fleets to double their fishing power every 35 years and put even more pressure on dwindling fish stocks, new research has found.
NASA finds Tropical Depression Peipah dissipating
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the northwestern Pacific Ocean and provided a final view of Tropical Depression Peipah.
Dartmouth research advances noise cancelling for quantum computers
The characterization of complex noise in quantum computers is a critical step toward making the systems more precise.
Cosmetic changes are equivalent after WBI vs PBI for women with early stage breast cancer
Results from the Quality of Life substudy of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 indicate that women rated post-lumpectomy partial breast irradiation (PBI) as equivalent to whole breast irradiation (WBI) in terms of cosmetic outcomes and satisfaction from baseline to three years following radiotherapy treatment.
Acute chikungunya infection studied at the molecular level in Brazilian patients
Using a systems biology approach, Brazilian researchers identified several genes that can be explored as therapeutic targets and as biomarkers of predisposition to chronic joint pain.
NASA finds Kiko weakening in the Eastern Pacific
NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the National Hurricane Center with infrared data and cloud top temperature information on Hurricane Kiko.
Nanoparticles used to transport anti-cancer agent to cells
Scientists from the University of Cambridge have developed a platform that uses nanoparticles known as metal-organic frameworks to deliver a promising anti-cancer agent to cells.
Renegade genes caught red handed
Potentially dangerous genes embedded within human DNA were once thought to be locked down by helpful DNA structures called heterochromatin.
To address hunger, many countries may have to increase carbon footprint
Achieving an adequate, healthy diet in most low- and middle-income countries will require a substantial increase in greenhouse gas emissions and water use due to food production, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
New research: More than every second female homicide is committed by the partner
Intimate partner homicide - that is women who are killed by their partner - constitutes a significant proportion of the homicide statistics in Denmark.
Most American adults do not know that HPV causes oral, anal, and penile cancers
More than 70% of US adults are unaware that human papillomavirus (HPV) causes anal, penile, and oral cancers, according to an analysis led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health and published in the current issue of JAMA Pediatrics.
Palmer amaranth's molecular secrets reveal troubling potential
Corn, soybean, and cotton farmers shudder at the thought of Palmer amaranth invading their fields.
Study shows the importance of when adolescents sleep to obesity and cardiometabolic health
New study finds adolescent sleep timing preferences and patterns should be considered risk factors for obesity and cardiometabolic health.
Eating cheese may offset blood vessel damage from salt
Antioxidants naturally found in cheese may help protect blood vessels from damage from high levels of salt in the diet, according to a new Penn State study.
KATRIN cuts the mass estimate for the elusive neutrino in half
An international team of scientists has announced a breakthrough in its quest to measure the mass of the neutrino, one of the most abundant, yet elusive, elementary particles in our universe.
Radiation therapy effective against deadly heart rhythm
A single high dose of radiation aimed at the heart significantly reduces episodes of a potentially deadly rapid heart rhythm, according to results of a phase one/two study at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
New algorithm can distinguish cyberbullies from normal Twitter users with 90% accuracy
A team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, have developed machine learning algorithms which can successfully identify bullies and aggressors on Twitter with 90 percent accuracy.
Sweet success of parasite survival could also be its downfall
University of York scientists are part of an international team which has discovered how a parasite responsible for spreading a serious tropical disease protects itself from starvation once inside its human host.
Defective cilia linked to heart valve birth defects
Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common heart valve birth defect, is associated with genetic variation in human primary cilia during heart valve development, report Medical University of South Carolina researchers in Circulation.
Play equipment that gets kids moving
Parents will be pleased to know that more is not always better when it comes to play equipment for their children.
Economists find mixed values of 'thoughts and prayers'
Christians who suffer from natural and human-caused disasters value thoughts and prayers from religious strangers, while atheists and agnostics believe they are worse off from such gestures.
Genetic mutation appears to protect some people from deadly MRSA
An inherited genetic tendency appears to increase the likelihood that a person can successfully fight off antibiotic-resistant staph infections, according to a study led by Duke Health researchers.
At-home blood pressure tests more accurate for African Americans
At-home measurements are more accurate, less expensive, and easier to obtain than blood pressure screenings done in medical settings.
Combination of wood fibers and spider silk could rival plastic
Combination of wood fibres and spider silk could rival plastic The unique material outperforms most of today's synthetic and natural materials by providing high strength and stiffness, combined with increased toughness
Success story or artificial inflation? Hospital performance in CAUTIs
A new study links changes in the way catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are defined and artificially improved hospital performance scores.
NIH-funded study suggests teen girl 'night owls' may be more likely to gain weight
Teen girls -- but not boys -- who prefer to go to bed later are more likely to gain weight, compared to same-age girls who go to bed earlier, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Are existing laws enough to cope with accelerating environmental change?
Do you think that major statutory reform is necessary address global environmental challenges?
Commonly used drug for Alzheimer's disease doubles risk of hospitalization
A drug commonly used to manage symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias -- donepezil -- is associated with a two-fold higher risk of hospital admission for rhabdomyolysis, a painful condition of muscle breakdown, compared with several other cholinesterase inhibitors, found a study in CMAJ.
Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops
Once dismissed as 'junk DNA' that served no purpose, a family of 'jumping genes' found in tomatoes has the potential to accelerate crop breeding for traits such as improved drought resistance.
Only a third of women take up all offered cancer screenings, new research finds
In a paper published today in the Journal of Medical Screening, researchers from King's College London and Queen Mary University of London have found that despite free cancer screening programs, only 35% take part in all offered programs.
A modelling tool to rapidly predict weed spread risk
A new statistical modelling tool will enable land management authorities to predict where invasive weed species are most likely to grow so they can find and eliminate plants before they have time to spread widely.
In mice: Transplanted brain stem cells survive without anti-rejection drugs
In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have developed a way to successfully transplant certain protective brain cells without the need for lifelong anti-rejection drugs.
Chronotype, social jet lag associated with higher waist size, fat mass in adolescent girls
For adolescent girls but not boys, bigger waistlines and greater fat mass were associated with being an evening chronotype who prefers going to bed and waking up later and greater social jet lag because of later sleep timing on weekends versus weekdays, independent of sleep duration and other lifestyle factors.
Anemia may contribute to the spread of dengue fever
Mosquitoes are more likely to acquire the dengue virus when they feed on blood with low levels of iron, researchers report in the 16 September issue of Nature Microbiology.
Social isolation derails brain development in mice
Female mice housed alone during adolescence show atypical development of the prefrontal cortex and resort to habitual behavior in adulthood, according to new research published in eNeuro.
Overgrowth of baby in the womb may begin weeks before women are tested for maternal diabetes
The excessive growth of a baby in the womb, a common complication of gestational diabetes, begins weeks before women are tested for the disease, according to new research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.
Uncovering the hidden 'noise' that can kill qubits
MIT and Dartmouth College researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, a tool that detects new characteristics of environmental 'noise' that can destroy the fragile quantum state of qubits, the fundamental components of quantum computers.
Vitamin E found to prevent muscle damage after heart attack
Early studies from scientists at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia and Jena University in Germany have found Vitamin E could be used to save the muscle from dying during a heart attack.
Flavoring ingredient exceeds safety levels in e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco
A potential carcinogen that has been banned as a food additive is present in concerningly high levels in electronic cigarette liquids and smokeless tobacco products, according to a new study from Duke Health.
Taking evolution to heart
An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has adapted to support endurance physical activities.
Study shows importance of tailoring treatments to clearly defined weed control objectives
A new study in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management shows that working smarter, not harder, can lead to better control of invasive weeds.
Groundbreaking study targets one of Canada's most deadly medical conditions
Scientists have shown for the first time evidence that early sampling of blood for microorganisms in sepsis is critical to treating the common and potentially fatal condition.
Cause of rare, fatal disorder in young children pinpointed
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis appear to have solved a decades-long mystery regarding the precise biochemical pathway leading to a fatal genetic disorder in children that results in seizures, developmental regression and death, usually around age 3.
ACC issues principles for overcoming compensation, opportunity inequity
The American College of Cardiology today published its first health policy statement on cardiologist compensation and opportunity equity, recognizing that both are critical to the health and future of the cardiovascular workforce and achieving ACC's mission to transform cardiovascular care and improve heart health.
Scientists prove low cost arthritis drug can effectively treat blood cancer sufferers
A simple arthritis drug could be an effective, low cost solution to treat patients with blood cancers such as polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET), a breakthrough study by the University of Sheffield has shown.
Victorian hog deer genetics revealed
Australian researchers looking for a genetic lifeline to endangered hog deer species endemic to Pakistan, northern India and mainland southeast Asia have found widespread hybridisation of the species in Victoria.
Reduced-dose IMRT w/ cisplatin meets predetermined benchmarks for PFS and swallowing-related QOL
Results of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-HN002 indicated that the combination of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and cisplatin was able to meet acceptability criteria for progression-free survival (PFS) and swallowing-related quality of life for patients who have p16-positive, non-smoking-associated oropharyngeal cancer.
Research suggests the happiest introverts may be extraverts
If you are an introvert, force yourself to be an extravert.

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