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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 18, 2019


NASA-NOAA satellite provides forecasters a view of tropical storm Jerry's structure
Tropical Storm Jerry is the latest in a line of tropical cyclones to develop in the North Atlantic Ocean this season.
Cross clade immune responses found in South Africa from the RV144/Thai HIV vaccine regimen
A clade B/E based vaccine regimen induced cross-clade responses in South Africans and, at peak immunogenicity, the South African vaccines exhibited significantly higher cellular and antibody immune responses than the Thai vaccines.
Extreme flooding from storm surge and heavy precipitation projected to increase higher probability of compound flooding from precipitation and storm surge in Europe under anthropogenic climate change
Risk of compound flooding, which can result when rapid sea level rises associated with storms occur along with heavy rains, is currently concentrated along Mediterranean countries but will greatly increase for Northern European in the future as the climate warms, according to a new modeling study.
Fathers may protect their LGB kids from health effects of discrimination
Lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals who report being discriminated against but who feel close to their fathers have lower levels of C-reactive protein -- a measure of inflammation and cardiovascular risk -- than those without support from their fathers, finds a new study from researchers at NYU College of Global Public Health.
Scientists set to start $10M project to create health diagnosis tool for bees
With Canada's honey bees dying, beekeepers and government regulators have been left struggling to find ways to quickly diagnose, manage and improve bee health.
Three faces of teen popularity: being feared, being loved, and being feared and loved
In novel longitudinal study, researchers identified three distinct types of teen popularity: prosocial popular; aggressive popular; and bistrategic popular or Machiavellian.
Developmental psychology -- One good turn deserves another
Five-year-olds enforce reciprocal behavior in social interactions. A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich psychologists shows that children come to recognize reciprocity as a norm between the ages of 3 and 5.
Brain imaging shows how nonverbal children with autism have slower response to sounds
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) used state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques to determine how nonverbal or minimally verbal people who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD) processes auditory stimuli, which could have important diagnostic and prognostic implications across the autism spectrum.
Guppies teach us why evolution happens
New study on guppies shows that animals evolve in response the the environment they create in the absence of predators, rather than in response to the risk of being eaten.
New factor in the development of childhood lymphoma
The immune system is highly complex and a detailed understanding of many underlying mechanisms is still lacking.
Babies' gut bacteria affected by delivery method, Baby Biome project shows
Babies born vaginally have different gut bacteria -- their microbiome -- than those delivered by caesarean, research has shown.
Study: Spend more on housing, teens in foster care are less likely to be homeless, jailed
New research: Spend more on transitional housing and teens in foster care are less likely to be homeless, jailed.
Dust from a giant asteroid crash caused an ancient ice age
About 466 million years ago, long before the age of the dinosaurs, the Earth froze.
Scientists develop DNA microcapsules with built-in ion channels
A Research group led by Tokyo Tech reports a way of constructing DNA-based microcapsules that hold great promise for the development of new functional materials and devices.
New SwRI study argues that Saturn's rings are actually not young
No one knows for certain when Saturn's iconic rings formed, but a new study co-authored by a Southwest Research Institute scientist suggests that they are much older than some scientists think.
Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy.
Coastal birds can weather the storm, but not the sea
Coastal birds survive because their populations can absorb impacts and recover quickly from hurricanes--even storms many times larger than anything previously observed.
CBD may alleviate seizures, benefit behaviors in people with neurodevelopmental conditions
A marijuana plant extract, also known as cannabidiol (CBD), is being commonly used to improve anxiety, sleep problems, pain, and many other neurological conditions.
Patients with high blood sugar variability much more likely to die than those with stable visit-to-visit readings
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (16-20 Sept) shows that patients with the highest variability in their blood sugar control are more than twice as likely to die as those with the most stable blood sugar measurements.
CU researchers: Fast MRIs offer alternative to CT scans for pediatric head injuries
Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have released a study that shows that a new imaging method 'fast MRI' is effective in identifying traumatic brain injuries in children, and can avoid exposure to ionizing radiation and anesthesia.
How often do hospitals, physician practices screen patients for food, housing, other social needs?
National survey data helped the authors of this study examine how common it is for US hospitals and physician practices to screen patients for social needs such as food insecurity, housing instability, utility and transportation needs, and experience with interpersonal violence.
Study: Obesity associated with abnormal bowel habits -- not diet
Because researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center demonstrated for the first time that a strong association between obesity and chronic diarrhea is not driven by diet or physical activity, the findings could have important implications for how physicians might approach and treat symptoms of diarrhea in patients with obesity differently.
Quantum physics -- Simulating fundamental interactions with ultracold atoms
An international team of physicists succeeded in precisely engineering key ingredients to simulate a specific lattice gauge theory using ultracold atoms in optical lattices.
Genetically tailored instruction improves songbird learning
A new UC San Francisco study conducted in songbirds demonstrates that what at first appear to be genetic constraints on birds' song learning abilities could be largely eliminated by tailoring instruction to better match the birds' inborn predispositions.
Tel Aviv University researchers discover evidence of biblical kingdom in Arava Desert
A new Tel Aviv University study provides evidence of the biblical kingdom of Edom that flourished in the Arava Desert in today's Israel and Jordan during the 12th-11th centuries BCE.
How sleepless nights compromise the health of your gut
Why are individuals that have irregular schedules, such as night-shift workers, more susceptible to gut inflammation and obesity?
Cutting emissions gradually will avert sudden jump in warming
Steadily reducing fossil fuel emissions over coming years will prevent millions of premature deaths and help avoid the worst of climate change without causing a large spike in short-term warming that some studies predict, new analysis from Duke University and the University of Leeds finds.
Researchers find way to study proteins moving (relatively) slowly
Proteins keep our organs functioning, egulate our cells and are the targets for medications that treat a number of diseases, including cancers and neurological diseases.
UMD-led study captures six galaxies undergoing sudden, dramatic transitions
A team of astronomers observed six mild-mannered LINER galaxies suddenly and surprisingly transforming into ravenous quasars -- home to the brightest of all active galactic nuclei.
MSU research team discovers new microbe in wheat stem sawfly
Montana State University researchers Carl Yeoman and David Weaver published a paper with a group of colleagues in August discussing the potential ramifications of the discovery for combating the damage done by these sawflies each year.
New study is first to show long-term durability of early
A new study presented at EASD and published in The Lancet is the first to show that early combination therapy using vildagliptin and metformin in patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) leads to better long-term blood sugar control and a reduced rate of treatment failure than metformin alone (the current standard-of-care treatment for patients newly diagnosed with T2D).
Low-cost blood pressure drug improves brain function in individuals with autism
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders have discovered a version of the drug known as propranolol could provide cognitive and social benefits for those living with autism spectrum disorder.
Child's gluten intake during infancy, rather than mother's during pregnancy, linked to increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes
New research presented at the Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (16-20 September) shows that a child's intake of gluten at age 18 months is associated with a 46% increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes for each extra 10g of gluten consumed.
3D virtual reality models help yield better surgical outcomes
A UCLA-led study has found that using three-dimensional virtual reality models to prepare for kidney tumor surgeries resulted in substantial improvements, including shorter operating times, less blood loss during surgery and a shorter stay in the hospital afterward.
Early maternal anemia tied to intellectual disability, ADHD and autism
The timing of anemia -- a common condition in late pregnancy -- can make a big difference for the developing fetus, according to research at Karolinska Institutet published in JAMA Psychiatry.
Planned roads would be 'dagger in the heart' for Borneo's forests and wildlife
Malaysia's plans to create a Pan-Borneo Highway will severely degrade one of the world's most environmentally imperilled regions, says a research team from Australia and Malaysia.
Immigrants who committed felonies less likely than nonimmigrants to commit another felony
A new study compared recidivism rates of foreign-born and native-born individuals formerly incarcerated for felonies and released from prisons in Florida.
Study examines association between prenatal anemia, neurodevelopmental disorders in children
Data on 500,000 children born in Sweden were used to examine the association between mothers with anemia during pregnancy and the risk of children being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability.
UVA engineering-led team unveils 'Tunabot,' first robotic fish to keep pace with a tuna
Mechanical engineers at the University of Virginia School of Engineering, leading a collaboration with biologists from Harvard University, have created the first robotic fish proven to mimic the speed and movements of live yellowfin tuna.
Brain tumors form synapses with healthy neurons, Stanford-led study finds
Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown for the first time that severe brain cancers integrate into the brain's wiring.
Study shows interactions between bacteria and parasites
A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has completed the first study of the effects of a simultaneous infection with blood flukes (schistosomes) and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori -- a fairly common occurrence in some parts of the world.
Heart cells respond to heart attack and increase the chance of survival
The heart of humans and mice does not completely recover after a heart attack.
Artificial intelligence probes dark matter in the universe
A team of physicists and computer scientists at ETH Zurich has developed a new approach to the problem of dark matter and dark energy in the universe.
Ecologists find strong evidence of fishing down the food web in freshwater lake
Research by ecologists at the University of Toronto and Ontario's Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry shows strong evidence in a freshwater lake of ''fishing down the food web'' - the deliberate shift away from top predatory fish on the food chain to smaller species closer to the base.
Army research uncovers law-like progression of weapons technologies
Anticipating the technology and weapon systems of our future Army might not be entirely daunting, new Army research finds.
Want to optimize sales performance?
CATONSVILLE, MD, September 16, 2019- According to new research published in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science, companies can improve sales performance when they adjust sales commissions for the sale of more popular items.
Supportive relationships in childhood leads to longer lives
Individuals raised in families with higher socioeconomic status were more optimistic in midlife, and in turn, lived longer.
Extinct human species gave modern humans an immunity boost
Garvan researchers have discovered a gene variant that sheds new light on how human immunity was fine-tuned through history.
DNA 'origami' takes flight in emerging field of nano machines
'DNA mechanotechnology' is a new field to engineer DNA machines that generate, transmit and sense mechanical forces at the nanoscale.
Preference for fentanyl higher amount young, white, frequent opioid users
A minority of people who use illicit opioids indicated a preference for fentanyl, the super-potent synthetic opioid that accounts for much of the recent rise in US overdose deaths, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Study helps parents build resilience to navigate child's cancer
In a study published in JAMA Network Open, Seattle Children's researchers found that one-on-one sessions teaching skills through a tool called Promoting Resilience in Stress Management for Parents (PRISM-P) improved resilience and benefit finding, or personal growth, among parents of children with cancer.
Platinum-graphene fuel cell catalysts show superior stability over bulk platinum
Films of platinum only two atoms thick supported by graphene could enable fuel cell catalysts with unprecedented catalytic activity and longevity, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Study of ancient climate suggests future warming could accelerate
The rate at which the planet warms in response to the ongoing buildup of heat-trapping carbon dioxide gas could increase in the future, according to new simulations of a comparable warm period more than 50 million years ago.
Sesame yields stable in drought conditions
Research shows adding sesame to cotton-sorghum crop rotations is possible in west Texas
Searching for the characteristics of award-winning wine
New WSU research shows large wine challenges tend to favor wines with high ethanol and sugar levels.
Using unconventional materials, like ice and eggshells, as scaffolds to grow tissues
In a review publishing Sept. 18, 2019 in the journal Trends in Biotechnology, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Lowell explore recent efforts to use everyday materials like ice, paper, and spinach as tissue scaffolds.
NASA-NOAA satellite studies tropical storm Kiko's center
Hurricane Kiko weakened to a tropical storm, but imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed that the storm has maintained strength in the circular area of powerful storms around the low-level center.
The future of 'extremely' energy-efficient circuits
Data centers are processing data and dispensing the results at astonishing rates and such robust systems require a significant amount of energy -- so much energy, in fact, that information communication technology is projected to account for 20% of total energy consumption in the United States by 2020.
Rethinking scenario logic for climate policy
Current scenarios used to inform climate policy have a weakness in that they typically focus on reaching specific climate goals in 2100 - an approach which may encourage risky pathways that could have long-term negative effects.
Researchers develop thermo-responsive protein hydrogel
Bio-engineering researchers have created a biocompatible, protein-based hydrogel that could serve as a drug delivery system durable enough to survive in the body for more than two weeks while providing sustained medication release.
New lithium battery design could mean lighter, safer batteries for Soldiers
Less expensive, lighter and safer batteries are a vital need for warfighters; a new Army project may offer a solution.
Stabilizing neuronal branching for healthy brain circuitry
Novel molecular mechanism may regulate microtubule stability, important for neuronal branching and potentially for nerve regeneration.
Study points to new drug target in fight against cancer
Rice University researchers are members of an international team that's discovered how a cancer-linked version of the protein mitoNEET can close voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC), primary gateways in the outer surface of mitochondria.
Winning-at-all-costs in the workplace: Short-term gains could spell long-term disaster
Organizations endorsing a win-at-all-costs environment may find this management style good for the bottom-line, but it could come a price.
Climate protection and clean air: An integrated approach
From September 23 to 25, 2019, heads of government from around the world will convene at the United Nations General Assembly to discuss efforts to advance climate action and global sustainable development.
People with autism show atypical brain activity when coordinating visual and motor information
The brain is organized differently in individuals with ASD in its function for basic sensorimotor behaviors, but these functions can differ between people with autism.
Geophysicists challenge conventional view of the cause of porosity in weathered rock
New geophysics research challenges the conventional view of how a vital and life-sustaining feature of weathered rock is created.
Mechanism modeling for better forecasts, climate predictions
Modeling currents together with wind and waves provides more accurate predictions for weather forecasts and climate scientists.
Dartmouth study examines prevalence of screening for social needs
A new study from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that most US physician practices and hospitals report screening patients for at least one social need, a trend that is expected to increase in the future, and that practices that care for disadvantaged patients report higher screening rates.
Modeling a model nanoparticle
New research from the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering introduces the first universal adsorption model that accounts for detailed nanoparticle structural characteristics, metal composition and different adsorbates, making it possible to not only predict adsorption behavior on any metal nanoparticles but screen their stability, as well.
Study questions routine sleep studies to evaluate snoring in children
A new finding from the University of Maryland School of Medicine suggests that the pediatric sleep study -- used to diagnose pediatric sleep apnea and to measure improvement after surgery -- may be an unreliable predictor of who will benefit from having an adenotonsillectomy.
Researchers suggest cultural outreach prevents social exclusion
There lies untapped potential in arts education among children and teenagers who are in danger of being marginalised later in life, according to a new policy brief released by researchers of the ArtsEqual initiative.
NASA infrared data shows heavy rain potential along gulf from Imelda
One of the ways NASA researches tropical cyclones is using infrared data that provides temperature information.
Autoantibodies in pregnancy: A cause of behavioral disorders in the child?
Dysfunctions in the maternal immune system that occur during pregnancy could possibly lead to impaired brain development in the unborn child.
More operations are scheduled if doctor is well rested
Researchers at Linköping University have investigated how orthopaedic surgeons make decisions regarding surgery, and how the decisions are related to how much of their work shift they have completed.
Stevens team closes in on 'holy grail' of room temperature quantum computing chips
To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the other.
Study explores how rock expands near soil surface in Southern Sierra Nevada
Weathering of subsurface rock in the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California occurs due more to rocks expanding than from chemical decomposition.
'Poor man's qubit' can solve quantum problems without going quantum
Researchers have built and demonstrated the first hardware for a probabilistic computer, a possible way to bridge the gap between classical and quantum computing.
Discovery of tanycytic TSPO inhibition as a potential therapeutic target for obesity treatment
Professor Eun-Kyoung Kim's team in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences discovered the mechanism underlying the regulation of energy metabolism by hypothalamic tanycyte.
Towards better hand hygiene for flu prevention
Rubbing hands with ethanol-based sanitizers should provide a formidable defense against infection from flu viruses, which can thrive and spread in saliva and mucus.
Actions to save coral reefs could benefit all ecosystems
Scientists say bolder actions to protect the world's coral reefs will benefit all ecosystems, human livelihoods and improve food security.
Study examines associations between adverse childhood experiences, caregiver support, brain development
This study examined the association of adverse childhood experiences and caregiver support with the development of regions of the brain in childhood and adolescence.
Brain-computer interfaces without the mess
It sounds like science fiction: controlling electronic devices with brain waves.
A promising HIV vaccine shows signs of cross-protective benefits
One of the most successful candidate HIV vaccines to date -- initially tested in Thailand, where it had modest effects -- showed surprisingly strong efficacy when evaluated in a South African cohort, where a different strain of HIV is known to circulate.
Unlock your smartphone with earbuds
A University at Buffalo-led research team is developing EarEcho, a biometric tool that uses modified wireless earbuds to authenticate smartphone users via the unique geometry of their ear canal.
Walking slower and pausing for rest may enable older adults to maintain outdoor mobility
The potential positive, enabling, effects of walking modifications should also be considered when older people's functional ability declines.
Laser prototype for space-based gravitational wave detector
Researchers have announced a prototype for a laser at the heart of the first space-based gravitational wave observatory, known as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission.
Undervalued wilderness areas can cut extinction risk in half
Wilderness areas, long known for intrinsic conservation value, are far more valuable for biodiversity than previously believed, and if conserved, will cut the world's extinction risk in half, according to a new study published in the journal Nature.
Suntanner, heal thyself: Exosome therapy may enable better repair of sun, age-damaged skin
In a proof-of-concept study, researchers from North Carolina State University have shown that exosomes harvested from human skin cells are more effective at repairing sun-damaged skin cells in mice than popular retinol or stem cell-based treatments currently in use.
Microbe chews through PFAS and other tough contaminants
In a series of lab tests, a relatively common soil bacterium has demonstrated its ability to break down the difficult-to-remove class of pollutants called PFAS, researchers at Princeton University said.
These pink sea urchins have teeth that sharpen themselves
Sea urchins have five teeth, each held by a separate jaw in a circular arrangement at the center of their spiked, spherical bodies.
Study shows Texas leads in worksite lactation support initiatives
Texas is ranked in the top quarter of the US for its worksite lactation support initiatives, according to research led by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health.
Greenland's growing 'ice slabs' intensify meltwater runoff into ocean
Thick, impenetrable ice slabs are expanding rapidly on the interior of Greenland's ice sheet, where the ice is normally porous and able to reabsorb meltwater.
New tool improves beekeepers' overwintering odds and bottom line
A new tool from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) can predict the odds that honey bee colonies overwintered in cold storage will be large enough to rent for almond pollination in February.
Underweight babies more likely to develop type 2 diabetes more than a year earlier
New research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona, Spain (16-20 September) is the first study to show that babies born underweight are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes at a younger age (by more than one year).
Tailored 'cell sheets' to improve post-operative wound closing and healing
Scientists have designed a new method for post-operative wound closing and healing that is both fast and effective.
Gigantic asteroid collision boosted biodiversity on Earth
An international study led by researchers from Lund University in Sweden has found that a collision in the asteroid belt 470 million years ago created drastic changes to life on Earth.
Psoriasis drug target offers potential for osteosarcoma
Research reveals a new therapeutic target for the treatment of osteosarcoma.
The life aquatic made clear with freshwater lens
A Swansea University doctoral student has found a way to view the life of plants and animals in murky waters - by using a lens of freshwater.
Study gives the green light to the fruit fly's color preference
In a study published in the journal Nature on Wednesday, University of Miami researchers made two unexpected discoveries.
New yardstick offers diagnostic and treatment guidance for idiopathic anaphylaxis
The new 'Idiopathic Anaphylaxis Yardstick' will help physicians who might be searching for guidance on next steps after their patient has an anaphylactic reaction of an unknown origin.
Study quantifies impact of NCI-sponsored trials on clinical cancer care
A new study shows that nearly half of phase 3 cancer clinical trials carried out by the National Cancer Institute-sponsored SWOG Cancer Research Network, one of five groups in NCI's National Clinical Trials Network, were associated with clinical care guidelines or new drug approvals.
When is a child an adult?
When does childhood end? That's the question international researchers are asking as they chart age cut-offs for paediatric services around the world.
Compound may play role in halting panceatic cancer
In early test tube and mouse studies, investigators at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have found that nonmuscle myosin IIC (MYH14), a protein activated in response to mechanical stress, helps promote metastatic behavior in pancreatic cancer cells, and that the compound 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), known to stiffen myosin IIC-containing cells, can send it into overdrive, overwhelming the ability of cells to invade nearby tissue.
Over 14% efficiency for ternary organic solar cell with 300 nm thick active layer
A thick-film (300 nm) ternary OSC is fabricated by introducing phe-nyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl ester (PC61BM) into a PBDB-T-2Cl:BTP-4F host blend, as these materials presented complementary absorption and well-matched energy levels.
University of Minnesota researchers find new ways to improve CPR
An international research consortium, which included faculty members from the University of Minnesota Medical School, was able to identify what is likely an optimal combination of chest compression frequency and depth when performing CPR.
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain.
Shifting the focus of climate-change strategies may benefit younger generations
Strategies to limit climate change that focus on warming in the next couple of decades would leave less of a burden for future generations.
Coral reefs and squat lobsters flourished 150 million years ago
An amazing trove of 150 million-year-old coral reef fossils from eastern Austria -- at the time a shallow sea -- provides a snapshot of a diverse and thriving community of creatures, including 53 species of squat lobsters.
Poor diabetes control costs the NHS in England £3 billion a year in potentially avoidable hospital treatment
Poor diabetes control was responsible for £3 billion in potentially avoidable hospital treatment in England in the operational year 2017-2018, according to new research comparing the costs of hospital care for 58 million people with and without diabetes.
Teen e-cigarette use doubles since 2017
Data from the 2019 Monitoring the Future Survey of eighth, 10th and 12th graders show alarmingly high rates of e-cigarette use compared to just a year ago, with rates doubling in the past two years.
Mayo researchers demonstrate senescent cell burden is reduced in humans by senolytic drugs
In a small safety and feasibility clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated for the first time that senescent cells can be removed from the body using drugs termed 'senolytics.' The result was verified not only in analysis of blood but also in changes in skin and fat tissue senescent cell abundance.
Modifying the structure to meet the demands
The functionalization of structural backbone of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are pivotal to meet the required properties of the desired materials.
Alarming number of heart infections tied to opioid epidemic
As the nationwide opioid epidemic continues, more young people are developing a life-threatening heart infection that can result from drug abuse.
Study shows pre-disaster collaboration key to community resilience
LSU Health New Orleans-led research reports that the key to improving community resiliency following disasters is a dynamic partnership between community-based organizations and public health agencies established pre-disaster.
Porcupinefish inspires sturdy superhydrophobic material
Nature has evolved a dazzling array of materials that help organisms thrive in diverse habitats.
NASA's wide view of major hurricane Humberto's massive Atlantic 'tail'
NASA's Aqua satellite is one in a fleet of NASA satellites that provide data for research.
Shape-shifting robots built from smarticles could navigate Army operations
A US Army project took a new approach to developing robots -- researchers built robots entirely from smaller robots known as smarticles, unlocking the principles of a potentially new locomotion technique.
Wilderness areas halve extinction risk
The global conservation community has been urged to adopt a specific target to protect the world's remaining wilderness areas to prevent large scale loss of at-risk species.
NASA sees heavy rainfall occurring in strengthening Tropical Storm Mario
When the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, it flew over the eastern side of Tropical Storm Mario and measured rainfall.
Combination therapies could help treat fatal lung cancers
Combining a new class of drug with two other compounds can significantly shrink lung tumours in mice and human cancer cells, new research shows.
Scientists construct energy production unit for a synthetic cell
Scientists at the University of Groningen have constructed synthetic vesicles in which ATP, the main energy carrier in living cells, is produced.
Microbe from New Jersey wetlands chomps PFAS
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are building up in the environment, and scientists are becoming concerned.
Tensile strength of carbon nanotubes depends on their chiral structures
Single-walled carbon nanotubes should theoretically be extremely strong, but it remains unclear why their experimental tensile strengths are lower and vary among nanotubes.
Scientists forecasted late May tornado outbreak nearly 4 weeks in advance
A team of scientists reports that they accurately predicted the nation's extensive tornado outbreak of late May 2019 nearly 4 weeks before it began.
Learning to read boosts the visual brain
How does learning to read change our brain? Does reading take up brain space dedicated to seeing objects such as faces, tools or houses?
Study finds new way to make chemotherapy more effective against pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal malignancy that most often is resistant to chemotherapy.
New tool in fight against malaria
Modifying a class of molecules originally developed to treat the skin disease psoriasis could lead to a new malaria drug that is effective against malaria parasites resistant to currently available drugs.
Sound of the future: A new analog to quantum computing
In a paper published in Nature Research's journal, Communications Physics, researchers in the University of Arizona Department of Materials Science and Engineering have demonstrated the possibility for acoustic waves in a classical environment to do the work of quantum information processing without the time limitations and fragility.
WSU grizzly research reveals remarkable genetic regulation during hibernation
New RNA sequencing-based genetic research conducted at Washington State University's Bear Research, Education, and Conservation Center shows grizzlies express a larger number of genes in preparation for, and during hibernation to cope with such stressors, than do any other species studied.
Inequality: What we've learned from the 'Robots of the late Neolithic'
Seven thousand years ago, societies across Eurasia began to show signs of lasting divisions between haves and have-nots.
Inconsistencies between electronic health record, physicians' observed behaviors
A study of nine emergency department residents reports inconsistencies between the electronic medical record and physicians' behaviors observed and recorded during patient encounters.
Large meta-analysis links IVF to higher gestational diabetes risk
Women who give birth to singleton babies following assisted reproductive technologies including vitro fertilisation (IVF) are at greater risk of developing gestational diabetes than those who conceive naturally, according to a meta-analysis involving over almost 2 million singleton pregnancies.

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We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
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Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.