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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 19, 2019


Grains in the rain
Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding.
LSU Health research targets metformin as breast cancer prescription
Research conducted by Suresh Alahari, PhD, Professor of Biochemistry and Genetics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found that metformin, a commonly prescribed drug for Type 2 Diabetes, may be effective in treating cancers that lack a protein called Nischarin.
McLean successfully integrates spirituality and religion with mental health treatment
McLean Hospital clinicians describe the success of the hospital's Spiritual Psychotherapy for Inpatient, Residential & Intensive Treatment (SPIRIT) program.
Study examines how people with psychopathic traits control their 'dark impulses'
How do people with psychopathic traits control their 'dark impulses?' A team of researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Kentucky are finding answers in levels of gray matter density in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, a region of the brain involved in the regulation of emotions, including fear and anger.
Lighting the path to renewable energy
Professor Mahesh Bandi of Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has co-developed a novel, standardized way of quantifying and comparing these variations in solar power.
Smoking abstinence has little impact on the motivation for food
It's sometimes thought that smokers who can't light up are likely to reach for food in lieu of cigarettes.
Investing in climate change is good business
Scientists call for governments around the world to urgently invest in reducing the rate and magnitude of climate change.
NASA-NOAA satellite finds Tropical Storm Mario more out of shape
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite imagery revealed Tropical Storm Mario appeared to be losing its rounded shape in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
Preventing climate change cheaper than dealing with its damage
World leaders need to urgently accelerate efforts to prevent 'profound, if not catastrophic' climate change in future, a distinguished group of scientists has warned.
Artificial materials reconstruct the porpoise's echolocation
Here, a study proposed a physical directional emission model to bridge the gap between porpoises' biosonar and artificial metamaterial.
Novel regulator of mitochondrial cell death reveals a promising target for cancer therapy
Wistar researchers have described the role of mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) in controlling survival of cancer cells, suggesting the protein could represent a promising therapeutic target.
ALS gene may be a hitchhiker's guide to the neuron
Researchers discovered that annexin A11, a gene linked to a rare form of ALS, may play a critical role in the transport of important, RNA encoded housekeeping instructions throughout neurons.
For the first time walking patterns identify specific types of dementia
Walking may be a key clinical tool in helping medics accurately identify the specific type of dementia a patient has, pioneering research has revealed.
Introducing 'mesh,' memory-saving plug-in to boost phone and computer performance
Applications like web browsers or smartphone apps often use a lot of memory.
Study shows both natural variation in ACE concentrations and lowering blood pressure with ACE inhibitors are associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.
New study reveals a strong link between vitamin D deficiency and increased mortality, especially diabetes-related deaths
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.
Study estimates more than 100,000 cancer cases could stem from contaminants in tap water
A toxic cocktail of chemical pollutants in US drinking water could result in more than 100,000 cancer cases, according to a peer-reviewed study from Environmental Working Group -- the first study to conduct a cumulative assessment of cancer risks due to 22 carcinogenic contaminants found in drinking water nationwide.
Princeton physicists discover topological behavior of electrons in 3D magnetic material
Researchers explored a type of material in which the electrons behave according to the mathematical rules of topology.
BU researchers create new protocol to improve gene therapy tool production
A method to create a faster and lower cost alternative for a gene therapy tool has been developed by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers.
To grow or to flower: Genes IDed in early land plant descendant also found in modern crops
Since they first arrived on land, plants have likely been using the same genetic tools to regulate whether they grow bigger or reproduce.
Ketoacidosis and high-blood sugar comas in patients with type 1 diabetes linked to increased risk of suicide attempt
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept.
Alzheimer's drug also treats parasitic Chagas disease
The drugs currently used to treat Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, have serious side effects and limited use in those with chronic disease.
Perception of musical pitch varies across cultures
Unlike US residents, people in a remote area of the Bolivian rain forest usually do not perceive the similarities between two versions of the same note played at different registers, an octave apart.
Mast cell expansion from blood
Mast cells are critically involved in immunity and immune disorders.
Salmonella causing bloodstream infections in central Africa resistant to nearly all drugs
The first extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogen which is responsible for millions of bloodstream infections per year in sub-Saharan Africa, have been identified in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).
'Nanochains' could increase battery capacity, cut charging time
A new method could allow better materials to make up battery electrodes by converting them into a nanochain structure, extending battery lifetime and increasing stability.
Electric tech could help reverse baldness
Reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Earth Commission to identify risks, guardrails, targets for entire planet
A new Earth Commission, comprised of 19 of the world's foremost scientists, chaired by Johan Rockström, Joyeeta Gupta, and Dahe Qin, will define guardrails -- akin to >2C for climate -- for land, water, oceans and biodiversity leading to a coherent suite of practical, science-based targets.
Plasma flow near sun's surface explains sunspots, other solar phenomena
A new model for plasma flow within the sun provides novel explanations for sunspots, the 11-year sunspot cycle, solar magnetic reversals and other previously unexplained solar phenomena.
Key similarities discovered between human and archaea chromosomes
A study led by Indiana University is the first to reveal key similarities between chromosomes in humans and archaea.
For people with pre-existing liver disease, toxic algae may be more dangerous
Blooms of blue-green algae have flourished across much of the United States this year.
Wild animals' immune systems decline with age, sheep study finds
It is well established that weakened immune systems in old age affect people's health and fitness, but a study suggests that it is also an issue for wild animals.
No bones about it, this protein slows down fracture-healing
Broken bones are a bigger deal the older you are: healed bones of older people are weaker and more likely to re-fracture.
Did a common childhood illness take down the neanderthals?
A new study suggests that the extinction of Neanderthals may be tied to persistent, life-long ear infections due to the structure of their Eustachian tubes, which are similar to those of human infants.
Scientists develop new methodology to genetically modify lab mice and human cells
A team led by Cedars-Sinai has designed a rapid method to genetically alter laboratory mice and then used this method to produce personalized animal models of pediatric glioma, an aggressive type of malignant brain cancer in children.
Biologists untangle growth and defense in maize, define key antibiotic pathways
Studying the complex layers of immunity in maize, a staple for diets around the world, scientists have identified key genes that enable surprisingly diverse antibiotic cocktails that can be produced as defensive blends against numerous disease agents.
A single dose of yellow fever vaccine does not offer lasting protection to all children
José Enrique Mejía, Inserm researcher at Unit 1043 Center for Pathophysiology of Toulouse Purpan and Cristina Domingo from the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin have recently shown that around half of children initially protected by the yellow fever vaccination at 9 months of age lose that protection within the next 2 to 5 years, due to disappearance of the neutralizing antibodies.
Early palliative care for advanced lung cancer increases survival
Early palliative care is associated with better survival in patients with advanced lung cancer, according researchers with the Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System and Oregon Health and Science University.
Bridge between quantum mechanics and general relativity still possible
An international team of researchers developed a unified framework that would account for this apparent break down between classical and quantum physics, and they put it to the test using a quantum satellite called Micius.
Multicultural millennials respond positively to health 'edutainment': Baylor research says
Storytelling that educates and entertains -- aka 'edutainment' -- is a powerful communications tool that can lead to positive health-related changes among multicultural millennials, according to a new marketing study from Baylor University.
Antimicrobial resistance is drastically rising
An international team of researchers led by ETH has shown that antimicrobial-resistant infections are rapidly increasing in animals in low and middle income countries.
Comparing major adverse cardiovascular events among patients with diabetes, reduced kidney function treated with metformin or sulfonylurea
This observational study compared major cardiovascular events (including hospitalization for heart attack, stroke, transient ischemic attack or cardiovascular death) among patients with diabetes and reduced kidney function treated with metformin or a sulfonylurea (a class of drugs to treat diabetes).
Instant messaging in proteins discovered
Proteins are essential for every living cell and responsible for many fundamental processes.
Disrupting key protein alters biological rhythms in water flea
The E75 protein is a key regulator of some biological rhythms through interactions with nitric oxide.
The brain may actively forget during dream sleep
In a study of mice, a team of Japanese and US researchers show that REM sleep may be a time when the brain actively forgets.
The next agricultural revolution is here
By using modern gene-editing technologies to learn key insights about past agricultural revolutions, two plant scientists are suggesting that the next agricultural revolution could be at hand.
Cellular hitchhikers may hold a key to understanding ALS
RNA molecules get around nerve cells by hitching a ride on lysosomes.
Big cities breed partners in crime
Researchers have long known that bigger cities disproportionately generate more crime.
Researchers alter mouse gut microbiomes by feeding good bacteria their preferred fibers
Humans choose food based on the way it looks, smells, and tastes.
Study finds hub linking movement and motivation in the brain
Detailed observations in the lateral septum indicate that the well-connected region processes movement, and reward information to help direct behavior.
NASA satellite data shows Humberto's structure change
NASA's Aqua Satellite provided data on Major Hurricane Humberto that revealed its structure was changing as it was moving through the North Atlantic Ocean and past Bermuda.
Global trends in antimicrobial resistance of farm animals
From 2000 to 2018, the proportion of pathogens that infect farmyard chickens and pigs and that are also significantly resistant to antibiotics grew, a new study shows.
Overweight Danes are more likely to have overweight dogs according to new research
A new study from the University of Copenhagen reports that the prevalence of overweight dogs is markedly larger among overweight owners than among normal weight owners.
How to successfully recruit minority adolescents for STI/HIV prevention research
Disparities in rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV between Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino adolescents and their white counterparts are well documented.
LGBT+ women face barriers to healthcare
New study suggests diversity messaging is not filtering down to frontline staff.
NASA-NOAA satellite finds Lorena's strong storms lashing Mexico
Imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found Tropical Storm Lorena lashing the western coast of Mexico.
A bathroom scale could monitor millions with heart failure
Millions of heart failure patients are readmitted to hospitals every few months to adjust medications.
Appreciating the classical elegance of time crystals
Structures known as 'time crystals' -- which repeat in time as conventional crystals repeat in space -- have recently captured the interest and imagination of researchers across disciplines.
Latest issue of Alzheimer's & Dementia
Predicting heart disease might also be a warning sign for Alzheimer's; A new way to think about the environment and Alzheimer's research; Most dementia patients don't receive care from physicians who specialize in brain health.
The global imperative in stabilizing temperature increases at 1.5 degrees Celsius
Limiting warming to 1.5° Celsius rather than 2.0° Celsius would maintain significant proportions of systems such as Arctic summer sea ice, forests and coral reefs and have clear benefits for human health and economies, say Ove Hoegh-Guldberg and colleagues in this Review.
A new approach to touch-screen set-up position for best physical workload and visibility
This study aimed to propose a new method for a bi-objective optimization.
Persistent headache or back pain 'twice as likely' in the presence of the other
People with persistent back pain or persistent headaches are twice as likely to suffer from both disorders, a new study from the University of Warwick has revealed.
Medications underused in treating opioid addiction, Mayo Clinic expert says
Though research shows that medication-assisted treatment can help people who are addicted to opioids, the three drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are underused, according to a review of current medical data on opioid addiction in the U.S.
Nano bulb lights novel path
Rice University engineers have created what may be viewed as the world's smallest incandescent lightbulbs, collections of near-nanoscale materials called 'selective thermal emitters' that absorb heat and emit light.
Researchers relate neuropsychological tests with real-life activity in multiple sclerosis
To best serve the clinical needs of individuals with MS, neuropsychological testing needs to be viewed in larger context comprising non-cognitive variables, such as motor ability and demographic values, fatigue and depression, and disease activity and level of disability, as well as person-specific factors such as personality and coping styles.
Division by subtraction: Extinction of large mammal species likely drove survivors apart
A new study in Science suggests that the extinctions of mammoths, dire wolves and other large mammal species in North America drove surviving species to distance themselves from their neighbors, reducing interactions as predators and prey, territorial competitors or scavengers.
Neurological signals from the spinal cord surprise scientists
With a study of the network between nerve and muscle cells in turtles, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have gained new insight into the way in which movements are generated and maintained.
Hurricane Nicole sheds light on how storms impact deep ocean
2016's Hurricane Nicole had a significant effect on the ocean's carbon cycle and deep sea ecosystems, reports a team from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, and the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences.
Minorities more likely to have diabetes at lower weights
Being overweight or obese is commonly associated with diabetes, but a new Kaiser Permanente study finds the connection differs widely by race or ethnicity.
Where to park your car, according to math
In a world where the best parking space is the one that minimizes time spent in the lot, 2 physicists compare parking strategies and settle on a prudent approach.
New research shows dapagliflozin used to treat diabetes can also
Dapagliflozin, a drug that is already used to successfully treat type 2 diabetes (T2D) and prevent development of heart failure, can also be used to treat pre-existing heart failure, even in patients without T2D.
NASA estimates Tropical Depression Imelda's huge Texas rainfall
Northeastern Texas has borne the brunt of Tropical Depression Imelda's heavy rainfall and NASA estimated that rainfall with an algorithm that incorporates data from satellites and observations.
Neurons promote growth of brain tumor cells
In a current paper published in the journal 'Nature', Heidelberg-based researchers and physicians describe how neurons in the brain establish contact with aggressive glioblastomas and thus promote tumor growth / New tumor activation mechanism provides starting points for clinical trials.
Here's proof that bowel cancer screening reduces deaths
New research led by the University of South Australia shows just how effective bowel cancer screening is in helping to reduce the number of bowel cancer deaths by up to 45%.
Exclusive analysis: College student voting doubled in 2018
College-student voting rates in the 2018 midterm elections doubled compared to the 2014 midterms, marking a watershed election year for student voter turnout, according to a report today from the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education (IDHE) at Tufts University's Tisch College of Civic Life.
New methodology for improving the quality of managerial accounting
It is known that the real sector of the economy is of paramount importance in the development of any region, in ensuring the growth of its inhabitants' welfare.
Let there be light: Synthesizing organic compounds
The appeal of developing improved drugs to promote helpful reactions or prevent harmful ones has driven organic chemists to better understand how to synthetically create these molecules and reactions in the laboratory.
AI helps reduce Amazon hydropower dams' carbon footprint
A team of scientists has developed a computational model that uses artificial intelligence to find sites for hydropower dams in order to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
NTU Singapore scientists develop technique to observe radiation damage over femtoseconds
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technique to observe how radiation damages molecules over time-frames of just one quadrillionth of a second -- or a femtosecond.
Europeans trust the state and its institutions, but not politicians
The BBVA Foundation has presented the first module of its European Values Survey 2019, examining a broad set of values and attitudes held by the adult population of five European countries (Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Italy and Spain).
Wild African buffalo provide key insights into the genetics of TB resistance
Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Oregon State University discovered areas in the African buffalo genome linked to risk for TB infection.
Long lost human relative unveiled
Many people are familiar with the existence of Neanderthals, the humanoid species that was a precursor to modern humans, but far less is known Denisovans, a similar group that were contemporaries to the Neanderthals and who died out approximately 50,000 years ago.
NASA analyzes rainfall rates in new Tropical Storm Tapah
Tropical Storm Tapah formed quickly in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and as it was strengthening from a depression to a tropical storm, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead from its orbit in space and measured rainfall rates throughout the storm.
Circulating molecules in blood may be stepping stone for type 1 diabetes early prediction
Researchers from the Turku Bioscience Centre in Finland have found changes in molecules in the blood that might be new markers of type 1 diabetes.
Decoding how kids get into hacking
New research from Michigan State University identified characteristics and gender-specific behaviors in kids that could lead them to become juvenile hackers.
DGIST achieves the highest efficiency of flexible CZTSSe thin-film solar cell
DGIST Division of Energy Technology achieves the highest photoelectric conversion efficiency in the world.
How cancer breaks down your muscles
A solid tumor can cause muscle cells in the body to self-destruct.
How to construct a protein factory
The complexity of molecular structures in the cell is amazing.
Stem cells with 'dual identity' linked to loss of smell from sinus inflammation
In experiments with mice and human tissue samples, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that neuronal stem cells in the part of the nose responsible for the sense of smell transform themselves to perpetuate the long-term inflammation in chronic sinusitis.
Age-related decline in immune function takes sheep to the grave earlier
For the sheep of St. Kilda, growing old brings with it a late-life decline in immune resistance against pervasive parasitic worms, which greatly reduces the animal's chances of surviving overwinter, regardless of overall physiological condition.
UBC engineers create ways to keep stone waste out of landfills
Using polymers and natural stone slurry waste, UBC Okanagan researchers are manufacturing environmentally friendly stone composites.
Alcohol-producing gut bacteria could cause liver damage even in people who don't drink
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the build-up of fat in the liver due to factors other than alcohol, but its cause remains unknown.
Descendants of early Europeans and Africans in US carry Native American genetic legacy
Many people in the US do not belong to Native American communities but still carry bits of Native American DNA, inherited from European and African ancestors who had children with indigenous individuals during colonization and settlement.
Study: Even short-lived solar panels can be economically viable
A new study shows that, contrary to widespread belief within the solar power industry, new kinds of solar cells and panels don't necessarily have to last for 25 to 30 years in order to be economically viable in today's market.
Survival in women, men diagnosed with breast cancer
An analysis of nearly 1.9 million patients diagnosed with breast cancer suggests overall survival is lower among men than women and that undertreatments and clinical characteristics account for much of the difference.
Scientists identify a possible new treatment for diabetic retinopathy
About 1 in 3 diabetic patients develops diabetic retinopathy (DR), which can impair vision and lead to blindness.
RUDN University mathematician first described the movement in a flat strip of plasma
RUDN University mathematician for the first time proved the theorem of existence and uniqueness of solutions of the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in a strip.
Investments to address climate change are good business
New research suggests that over the next few decades, acting to reduce climate change is expected to cost much less than the damage otherwise inflicted by climate change on people, infrastructure and ecosystems.
New research shows that European hedgehogs in Denmark carry a secret
Through a research collaboration between Institute of Biology at University of Southern Denmark (SDU), Naturama and Statens Serum Institut, scientists have discovered, that Danish hedgehogs carry mecC-MRSA in their snouts.
Researchers show how railroad worms produce red light
Differences in the molecular structures explain the different colors of this bioluminescence in different species.
For gut microbes, not all types of fiber are created equal
Certain human gut microbes with links to health thrive when fed specific types of ingredients in dietary fibers, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
SMART announces a revolutionary tech to study cell nanomechanics
Researchers at SMART, MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, in collaboration with MIT's Laser Biomedical Research Center (LBRC), have built a microscope that enables scientists to study the nuclear mechanics of cells while keeping their native properties intact -- something that wasn't possible with the existing invasive methods for nuclear mechanics.
New UW study questions value of fluoride varnish
A new study by 2 University of Washington researchers and their colleagues questions the cost-effectiveness of fluoride varnish for preschoolers and calls its anti-cavity effects 'modest and uncertain' in this age group.
Temple researchers identify new target regulating mitochondria during stress
Like an emergency response team that is called into action to save lives, stress response proteins in the heart are activated during a heart attack to help prevent cell death.
New mechanism for dysfunctional insulin release identified
In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have identified a previously unknown mechanism that regulates release of insulin, a hormone that lowers blood glucose levels, from the β-cells (beta cells) of the pancreas.
USC researchers hone in on the elusive receptor for sour taste
USC scientists and colleagues identify sour taste receptor.
Antibody 'road block' enables fine-tuning for cardiac recovery
A new study published by Vanderbilt mechanobiology researchers details a possible solution for fine-tuning inflammation and cellular activity in cardiac recovery -- thanks to an antibody initially developed for rheumatoid arthritis. 
Religious hospitals often fail to supply adequate family planning training
Nearly half of all Catholic and other religious hospitals fail to comply with required abortion and family planning training for obstetrics and gynecology residents, putting women at potential risk, according to a new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
NASA-NOAA satellite finds Tropical Storm Kiko staying in shape
Satellite imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed Tropical Storm Kiko maintained its shape and strength after weakening from hurricane-force.
Nearly three billion fewer birds in North America since 1970
North America has lost nearly three billion birds since 1970, according to a new report, which also details widespread population declines among hundreds of North American bird species, including those once considered abundant.
Kindness is a top priority in a long-term partner according to a new international study
One of the top qualities that we look for in a long-term partner is kindness, according to new research by Swansea University.
New insight into the links between transport and land value
A new report reveals the relationships between transport and property value across the North of England.
Tumor resistance is promoted by anti-cancer protein
Areas of solid tumors that have limited access to oxygen, a condition called hypoxia, are highly resilient against chemo and radiation therapy.
Opioid prescriptions filled after eye surgery doubled from 2000 to 2014
Penn study suggests efforts in the past decade to reduce the invasiveness and recovery time for these procedures have not impacted opioid use; authors express concern in trend.
Researchers develop unified sensor to better control effects of shock waves
Researchers with Yokohama National University in Japan have developed a unified shock sensor to quickly and accurately dispel harmful shock waves.
Investments to address climate change are good for business
Study shows that reducing the magnitude of climate change is also a good investment.
Food as medicine: UTHealth and partners fill prescriptions for food insecurity
The answer to food insecurity could be as simple as a prescription for healthy food from your health care provider and the means to obtain it, particularly in food deserts, said researchers led by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health.
Quality control in cells
A protective protein that detects newly-made incomplete protein chains in higher cells is found to have a relative in bacteria.
Parental involvement plays key role in children's academic attainment, research shows
This is a peer-reviewed mixed methods study. New research has shown how parental engagement has a positive effect on a child's academic attainment -- regardless of age or socio-economic status.
First glimpse at what ancient Denisovans may have looked like, using DNA methylation data
Exactly what our ancient Denisovan relatives might have looked like had been anyone's guess for a simple reason: the entire collection of Denisovan remains includes a pinky bone, three teeth, and a lower jaw.
Innovative data and analytics platform to accelerate drug development for rare diseases
C-Path and NORD launched the Rare Disease Cures Accelerator-Data and Analytics Platform (RDCA-DAP) in Rockville, MD on Tuesday, Sept.
Cell biology: Endocannabinoid system may be involved in human testis physiology
The endocannabinoid system (ECS) may be directly involved in the regulation of the physiology of the human testis, including the development of sperm cells, according to a study in tissue samples from 15 patients published in Scientific Reports.
NASA analyzes rainfall rates in strengthening tropical storm Jerry
NASA has the unique capability of peering under the clouds in storms and measuring the rate in which rain is falling.
Genetic variants with possible positive implications for lifestyle
A German and British research team lead by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has examined the interplay between genetics, cardiovascular disease and educational attainment in a major population study.
In media coverage of climate change, where are the facts?
The New York Times stands out for its coverage of the environment and climate change.
Comparison of cardiovascular outcomes for medications to treat type 2 diabetes
This randomized clinical trial compared the outcomes of heart attack, stroke or death from cardiovascular causes among 6,000 patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with the glucose-lowering medications linagliptin or glimepiride.
When natural disasters strike, men and women respond differently
Women tend to take cover or prepare to evacuate sooner, but often have trouble convincing the men in their life to do so, suggests a new study exploring how gender influences disaster response.
Wearable brain-machine interface could control a wheelchair, vehicle or computer
Combining new classes of nanomembrane electrodes with flexible electronics and a deep learning algorithm could help disabled people wirelessly control an electric wheelchair, interact with a computer or operate a small robotic vehicle without donning a bulky hair-electrode cap or contending with wires.

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