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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 20, 2019


NASA catches Tropical Storm Tapah by the tail
Tropical Storm Tapah has a huge 'tail' on NASA satellite imagery.
Scientists identify a personality feature that could predict how often you exercise
Individuals who make concrete plans to meet their goals may engage in more physical activity, including visits to the gym, compared to those who don't plan quite so far ahead, research shows.
SUTD researchers revolutionize 3D printed products with data-driven design method
SUTD demonstrated this new cost-effective, data-driven approach by designing and 3D printing an ankle brace that has varying degrees of rigidity to provide both comfort and support for the user.
Open Medicare data helps uncover potential hidden costs of health care
Indiana University scientists have found an association between health care industry payments to medical providers for non-research expenses and what these providers charge for medical services -- shedding new light on potential hidden costs to the public.
Malawi study confirms lasting impact of life-saving technology
A study in the journal Pediatrics finds that the Malawi Ministry of Health's national adoption of affordable, rugged, neonatal CPAP technology resulted in sustained improvements in the survival of babies with respiratory illness.
Anthropologist contributes to major study of large animal extinction
University of Arkansas anthropology assistant professor Amelia Villaseñor contributed a large, multi-institutional study explaining how the human-influenced mass extinction of giant carnivores and herbivores of North America fundamentally changed the biodiversity and landscape of the continent.
Daily rainfall over Sumatra linked to larger atmospheric phenomenon
In a new study led by atmospheric scientist Giuseppe Torri at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), researchers revealed details of the connection between a larger atmospheric phenomenon, termed the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), and the daily patterns of rainfall in the Maritime Continent.
Long-acting injectable multi-drug implant shows promise for HIV prevention and treatment
UNC researchers have created an injectable multi-drug delivery system that is removable, biodegradable and effective for up to a year in some cases.
Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence
Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did -- with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence.
Today's forecast: How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities
Feature describes improved model for forecasting the crucial balance of pressure at the edge of a fusion plasma.
Leukemia drug shows promise for treating a childhood brain cancer
Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego researchers describe new use of leukemia drug, nilotinib, to treat subtype of medulloblastoma, a deadly pediatric brain cancer.
SCAI stages of cardiogenic shock stratify mortality risk
A new shock classification scheme released by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) and endorsed by the American College of Cardiology (ACC), American Heart Association, the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons was recently applied in a retrospective study analyzing patients in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) at the Mayo Clinic.
Pembrolizumab in metastatic NSCLC: Now added benefit for subpopulations
After a methodological uncertainty has been resolved, the analyses on overall survival are now usable.
The best of two worlds: Magnetism and Weyl semimetals
Imagine a world in which electricity could flow through the grid without any losses or where all the data in the world could be stored in the cloud without the need for power stations.
NASA finds a tiny tropical storm Kiko
NASA's Terra satellite is one in a fleet of NASA satellites that provide data for research.
Controlling methane is a fast and critical way to slow global warming, say experts
In independent studies, 2 Princeton University research teams recently identified surprisingly large sources of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, being leaked into the atmosphere.
Study suggests flavored e-cigarettes may worsen asthma
A study into the impact of flavored e-cigarettes, on allergic airways disease, suggests that some flavors may worsen the severity of diseases such as asthma.
World's first gene therapy for glycogen storage disease produces remarkable results
The clinical trial originally set out to simply test the safety and dosage of the gene therapy for three patients with GSD Type Ia.
Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
Neuroscientists (UNIGE) analysed how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant.
Chinese scientists develop novel biophotovoltaics system
Researchers from the Institute of Microbiology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have reported a novel biophotovoltaics (BPV) system based on a synthetic microbial consortium with constrained electron flow.
Undocumented immigrants' transplant survival rates on par with US citizens'
Unauthorized immigrants who receive liver transplants in the United States have comparable three-year survival rates to US citizens, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Sponge-like action of circular RNA aids heart attack recovery, Temple-led team discovers
Circular RNAs, like other noncoding RNAs, were thought to be nonfunctional, but recent evidence suggests otherwise.
Clarification of a new synthesis mechanism of semiconductor atomic sheet
Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan succeeded in clarifying a new synthesis mechanism regarding transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), which are semiconductor atomic sheets having thickness in atomic order.
New family of drugs which could combat prostate cancer identified at University of Bath
A new family of drugs which inhibit the activity of a protein associated with prostate and other cancers has been reported by scientists from the University of Bath.
NASA analyzes rainfall rates Hurricane Lorena over Mexico, and Mario nearby
Two tropical cyclones are very close together near the coast of western Mexico.
Marijuana use among US adults with, without medical conditions
National survey data was used in this study to examine how common marijuana use was among adults with and without medical conditions.
Weathering Antarctic storms -- Weather balloon data boost forecasting skill
Strong cyclones over the Southern Ocean and Antarctica can be very dangerous, and are relatively difficult to predict accurately because of the sparsity of observational data from this region.
New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields
Physicists and chemists at the University of Münster (Germany) have jointly succeeded in developing a so-called nano-tomographic technique which is able to detect the typically invisible properties of nano-structured fields in the focus of a lens.
Climate change study finds that maple syrup season may come earlier
Once winter nights dip below freezing and the days warm up above freezing sap begins to flow in sugar maples marking the start of the syrup season.
NASA data shows Humberto now post-tropical
Satellite data has confirmed that Humberto, once a major hurricane is now a post-tropical cyclone.
Untapped resource, or greenhouse gas threat, found below rifting axis off Okinawa coast
Using an automated method to create a high-resolution map of the seismic velocity below the seafloor, researchers from Kyushu University found a large-scale gas reservoir in an area where the Earth's upper layers are being separated.
Saving lives faster: Monash University develops world-first laser incubator for blood
Researchers from BioPRIA, based at Australia's Monash University, together with industry partner Haemokinesis, have developed the world's first blood incubator using laser technology.
Best performance of organic material for lithium battery anode using materials informatics
A research group established a new design strategy for organic materials for the anode of lithium-ion secondary cells through the use of Materials Informatics (MI).
Dengue virus becoming resistant to vaccines and therapeutics due to mutations in specific protein
Researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's Bioinformatics Institute, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, USA, have discovered that the dengue virus changes its shape through mutations in Envelope protein to evade vaccines and therapeutics.
journal of Dental Research centennial featured article: Tooth bioengineering and regene
Over the past 100 years, tremendous progress has been made in the fields of dental tissue engineering and regenerative dental medicine.
Rethinking how cholesterol is integrated into cells
Cholesterol is best known in connection with cardiovascular disease, but cholesterol is also vital for many fundamental processes in the body.
New insight as to how cells maintain their identity
In the body's cells, some proteins are of vital importance as to which genes are active or turned off.
Oral health effects of tobacco products: Science and regulatory policy proceedings
AADR held the 'Oral Health Effects of Tobacco Products: Science and Regulatory Policy' meeting.
Surface melting causes Antarctic glaciers to slip faster towards the ocean
Study shows for the first time a direct link between surface melting and short bursts of glacier acceleration in Antarctica.
Water may be scarce for new power plants in Asia
Climate change and over-tapped waterways could leave developing parts of Asia without enough water to cool power plants in the near future, new research indicates.
Study: Many Tennesseans are misinformed about tornado protection
More people die during tornadoes in the Southeast than anywhere else in the United States.
Fractal patterns in growing bacterial colonies
Lautaro Vassallo and his co-workers in Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Argentina have modelled the growth and sliding movement of bacterial colonies using a novel method in which the behaviour of each bacterium is simulated separately.
Hurricane Jerry gets its temperature taken by NASA-NOAA satellite
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the North Atlantic Ocean and used infrared light to obtain temperature information about Hurricane Jerry's cold cloud tops.
NASA estimates Imelda's extreme rainfall
NASA estimated extreme rainfall over eastern Texas from the remnants of Tropical Depression Imelda using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations.
Oil futures volatility and the economy
The drone strike on Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure has highlighted the fragile and interconnected relationship between crude oil supply and the global economy, with new research bringing these economic ties into greater focus.
Shocking embryonic limbs into shape
In a new study published in EPJ E, Vincent Fleury and Ameya Vaishnavi Murukutla from Universite Paris Diderot, Paris, France use the stimulation of chicken embryos with electric shocks to propose a mechanism for vertebrate limb formation.
Fewer lymph node operations for breast cancer patients with new prediction models
In recently published studies, researchers at Lund University and Skåne University Hospital in Sweden have produced new prediction models for improved personalised treatment of lymph nodes in breast cancer patients.
Staying at elementary school for longer associated with higher student attainment
A new study has discovered that US students achieve better results in reading and mathematics tests when they stay in elementary school for grades 6 (age 11-12) and 7 (age 12-13), rather than transfer to middle school.
New Penn-developed vaccine prevents herpes in mice, guinea pigs
A novel vaccine developed at Penn Medicine protected almost all mice and guinea pigs exposed to the herpes virus.
Pathway found for treatment-resistant lung cancer
A big way chemotherapy works is by prompting cancer cells to commit suicide, and scientists have found a pathway the most common lung cancer walks to avoid death.
Corrosion resistance of steel bars in concrete when mixed with aerobic microorganisms
Dissolved oxygen in pore solution is often a controlling factor determining the rate of the corrosion process of steel bars in concrete.
Diagnostic radiologists with lifetime ABR certificates less likely to participate in MOC
An ahead-of-print article from AJR discovers lifetime-certified diagnostic radiologists whose Maintenance of Certification was not mandated by the American Board of Radiology were far less likely to participate in ABR MOC programs--especially general radiologists and those working in smaller, nonacademic practices in states with lower population densities 'Many opinions have been expressed regarding MOC in radiology, but there is actually very little public data on the matter,' says Andrew Rosenkrantz, ARRS Leonard Berlin Scholar.
Researchers find way to kill pathogen resistant to antibiotics
Nagoya University researchers and colleagues in Japan have demonstrated a new strategy in fighting antibiotics resistance: the use of artificial haem proteins as a Trojan horse to selectively deliver antimicrobials to target bacteria, enabling their specific and effective sterilization.
HD microscopy in milliseconds
They can make tiny cell structures visible: cutting-edge light microscopes offer resolutions of a few tenths of a nanometre--in other words, a millionth of a millimeter.
Engineered bacterial biofilms immobilizing nanoparticles enable diverse catalytic applications
Immobilization is considered a feasible strategy for addressing toxicity and nanomaterial pollution confronted by nano-catalysts in practical applications.
Why the lettuce mitochondrial genome is like a chopped salad
The genomes of mitochondria are usually depicted as rings or circles.
UTA, University of Maryland team up to better understand sleep apnea treatment in children
Gautam Das, a professor in UTA's Computer Science and Engineering Department, worked with University of Maryland School of Medicine physicians to understand whether sleep studies predicted the improved outcomes following surgery for sleep apnea in children.

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