Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 23, 2019


Bee biodiversity barometer on Fiji
The biodiversity buzz is alive and well in Fiji, but climate change, noxious weeds and multiple human activities are making possible extinction a counter buzzword.
Fullerene compounds knock out virus infections
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology and the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS in collaboration with researchers from four other Russian and foreign research centers have discovered a new reaction that helps obtain water-soluble fullerene derivatives which effectively combat flu viruses, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV).
Artificial intelligence can improve sales by four times compared to some human employees
Chatbots, which use artificial intelligence to simulate human conversation through voice commands or text chats, incur almost zero marginal costs and can outsell some human employees by four times, so why aren't they used more often?
Fat mass index, not BMI, associated with cardiovascular events in people with diabetes
In people with diabetes, fat mass index, not body mass index (BMI), is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Context may explain why dads are happier and less stressed than moms
Dads are often happier, less stressed and less tired than moms when taking care of kids, and researchers say these differences may come down to how and when childcare activities are split between parents.
New AI app predicts climate change stress for farmers in Africa
A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool available for free in a smartphone app can predict near-term crop productivity for farmers in Africa and may help them protect their staple crops -- such as maize, cassava and beans -- in the face of climate warming, according to Penn State researchers.
DNA is held together by hydrophobic forces
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, disprove the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself.
Perturbed genes regulating white blood cells linked to autism genetics and severity
Researchers at UC San Diego say they are getting closer to identifying the mechanisms of autism spectrum disorder, revealing a critical gene network that is disrupted and which helps predict severity of symptoms.
Why are mountains so high?
Stanford researchers have analyzed mountain ranges worldwide to show that a theory relating erosion and mountain height doesn't always add up.
NASA satellite data shows Tapah becoming extra-tropical
Tropical Storm Tapah had taken on an elongated shape as it moved through the Sea of Japan, between South Korea and Japan.
Illinois researchers create first three-photon color-entangled W state
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have constructed a quantum-mechanical state in which the colors of three photons are entangled with each other.
Microplastics in the Great Lakes: Becoming benthic
From the Great Pacific garbage patch to inland rivers, plastics are among the most widespread contaminants on Earth.
West African camera survey details human pressures on mammals in protected areas
When University of Michigan wildlife ecologist Nyeema Harris started her multiyear camera survey of West African wildlife, she sought to understand interactions between mammals and people in protected areas such as national parks.
Karla crater confirmed to be an impact structure
The Karla crater, one of the about 150 large impact structures on Earth, is situated near the border of the Republic of Tatarstan and Chuvash Republic, about 163 kilometers from Kazan Federal University.
US pediatric heart transplant waitlist policy change falls short of intended benefits
In March 2016, the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network revised its criteria for prioritizing children awaiting heart transplantation in the US with the intention of reducing the number of deaths on the waitlist, but a new study suggests unintended consequences.
Study finds flaws in leading security lie detection training tool
Developed by an influential US psychologist, the Micro-Expressions Training Tool, or METT, inspired the hit TV show Lie to Me, is being used to train airport personnel to spot people who pose potential security risks.
Doctors are not using tools to help youths quit smoking
At a time when the rapid growth in electronic cigarette ''vaping'' among young people threatens to reverse decades of progress in reducing tobacco use, a large study published today in JAMA Pediatrics finds that medical professionals are largely failing to use existing tools to help young people quit smoking.
Numbers limit how accurately digital computers model chaos
Digital computers use numbers based on flawed representations of real numbers, which may lead to inaccuracies when simulating the motion of molecules, weather systems and fluids, find UCL and Tufts University scientists.
Antibody testing reveals dogs can suffer from same autoimmune encephalitis as humans
Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that dogs can suffer from the same type of autoimmune encephalitis that people do.
Gene regulators work together for oversized impact on schizophrenia risk
Researchers have discovered that gene expression regulators work together to raise an individual's risk of developing schizophrenia.
Researchers perform thousands of mutations to understand amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Researchers from IBEC and CRG in Barcelona use a technique called high-throughput mutagenesis to study Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), with unexpected results.
Faults' hot streaks and slumps could change earthquake hazard assessments
For more than a century, a guiding principle in seismology has been that earthquakes recur at semi-regular intervals according to a 'seismic cycle.' In this model, strain that gradually accumulates along a locked fault is completely released in a large earthquake.
Today's obesity epidemic may have been caused by childhood sugar intake decades ago
Current obesity rates in adults in the United States could be the result of dietary changes that took place decades ago, according to a new study published by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Opioid use disorder in pregnancy: 5 things to know
Opioid use is increasing in pregnancy as well as the general population.
Boosting daily nut consumption linked to less weight gain and lower obesity risk
Increasing nut consumption by just half a serving (14 g or ½ oz) a day is linked to less weight gain and a lower risk of obesity, suggests a large, long term observational study, published in the online journal BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health.
Cracking the ethylene code
Separating pure ethylene from ethane is a difficult and costly process, but one that new research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering is poised to streamline.
Loss of automatic reenrollment option associated with enrollment decrease in California marketplace
This research letter analyzed enrollment data from California's health insurance marketplace, Covered California, and study authors report losing the option to automatically reenroll because some insurers exited the marketplace was associated with a decrease in enrollment.
Even mother's mild depressive symptoms affect the child's emotional well-being
Even mild long-term depressive symptoms among mothers are connected with emotional problems among small children such as hyperactivity, aggressiveness and anxiety.
Scientists track frog-killing fungus to help curb its spread
With the help of advanced genetic testing and hundreds of frog skin swabs, an international team of researchers has created the most complete map to date of when and where different genetic variants of the frog-killing Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis have infected frog populations around the world.
New national guideline sets out best practices for delivering injectable opioid agonist treatment
A new Canadian guideline lays out the optimal strategies for providing injectable opioid agonist treatment with prescription heroin and hydromorphone for people with severe opioid use disorder.
The long-term effects of disasters on seniors with diabetes: evidence from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita
Older individuals with diabetes impacted by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita had a 40% higher one-month mortality rate than those who lived in unaffected counties and a 6% increase ten years later.
Affordable Care Act slashed the uninsured rate among people with diabetes
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provided health insurance for an estimated 1.9 million people with diabetes, according to a newly published study.
Depression and binge-drinking more common among military partners
New research from King's College London suggests that depression and binge-drinking are more common among the female partners of UK military personnel than among comparable women outside the military community.
Dartmouth study reveals how fungal biofilm structure impacts lung disease
Findings from an innovative new study led by researchers at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and published this week in Nature Microbiology reveal that the way in which human fungal pathogens form colonies can significantly impact their ability to cause disease.
Study identifies cardiovascular toxicities associated with ibrutinib
After a recent study showed that chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients who received ibrutinib as a frontline treatment had a 7% death rate, a new study offers a clearer picture on the reasons for the deaths.
Diving birds follow each other when fishing
Diving seabirds watch each other to work out when to dive, new research shows.
Empowering cancer patients to shift their mindsets could improve care, researchers argue
A cancer diagnosis can cause a significant emotional burden for patients and their families.
Scientists enlist tiny biomagnets for faster drug discovery
A new platform brings together CRISPR genome editing with magnetic cell sorting to reveal new drug targets for cancer and regenerative medicine.
Earth, wind, flora sway Trinidad sulfur levels
UC geologists get a glimpse into the power of wind, rain, coastal proximity and climate on coastal environments.
What would Jesus do? Quite possibly, recycle
A team of social scientists and sustainability scientists worked to peel off the layers of understanding about how Christianity and environmentalism mix.
Study confirms Monterey Bay Aquarium surrogate-reared sea otters helped restore threatened population
The population of threatened southern sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, an estuary in Central California, has made a significant comeback as a result of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Program.
Is overall screen time associated with academic performance in kids, teens?
Screen time overall wasn't associated with the academic performance of children and adolescents in this observational study.
Illinois researchers develop new framework for nanoantenna light absorption
Harnessing light's energy into nanoscale volumes requires novel engineering approaches to overcome a fundamental barrier known as the 'diffraction limit.' However, University of Illinois researchers have breached this barrier by developing nanoantennas that pack the energy captured from light sources.
No clear link between local food and cancer risk in glassworks areas
There is no clear link between cancer incidence and locally produced food from an area with a history of glass manufacture with contaminated soil, according to a new study from, among others, Linköping University in Sweden.
2018 Health of Houston Survey sheds light on residents
A snapshot of health conditions revealing the disparities across 38 neighborhood areas in Harris County has been published in the 2018 Health of Houston Survey by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health.
Pregnant women with obesity may not require additional calories for healthy pregnancies
Guidelines for weight gain and caloric intake during pregnancy are not tailored to women with obesity, 2/3 of whom gain excessive weight during pregnancy that poses a risk to mother and child.
Do the costs of cancer drugs receive enough attention?
A recent analysis from Canada found that information on health-related quality of life is often not collected for investigational cancer drugs or used to calculate the balance of costs and benefits of these drugs when they are submitted for reimbursement, according to findings published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.
One species, many origins
In a paper published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, a group of researchers argue that our evolutionary past must be understood as the outcome of dynamic changes in connectivity, or gene flow, between early humans scattered across Africa.
Saw but forgot -- drivers' memory lapses puts motorcyclists at risk
There are an estimated 90 fatalities a year in the UK caused by drivers pulling out into the path of an oncoming motorcycle.New research by psychologists at the University of Nottingham suggests this sort of crash may often be the result of a short-term memory failure rather than the driver not seeing an approaching motorcycle.
Compound extends survival in mice with certain pediatric brain tumors
Versions of an antibiotic drug called DON first isolated from soil bacteria more than 60 years ago have shown promising signs of extending survival in mice models of especially lethal pediatric brain tumors marked by the high expression of a cancer-causing gene known as the MYC oncogene, according to results of two studies from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
Green tea could hold the key to reducing antibiotic resistance
Scientists at the University of Surrey have discovered that a natural antioxidant commonly found in green tea can help eliminate antibiotic resistant bacteria.
Moral distress and moral strength among clinicians in health care systems
Nurse burnout impacts both nurses and patients, and significantly influences the retention of nurses in the healthcare setting, research shows.
Study shows MRI can help remove DOUBT when diagnosing minor strokes
A University of Calgary study is highlighting the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in helping to diagnose minor stroke and transient ischemic attacks.
Researchers recreate living 3D displays
A research team from the University of Iowa and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is developing a smart skin inspired by the cephalopod which can be used in 3D displays, as interfaces for the visually impaired, and to help reduce drag on marine vehicles.
Building on UD, Nobel legacy
New approach to producing indolent scaffolds could streamline development and production of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, which comprise the majority of medicines in use today.
Does being younger than classmates increase likelihood of childhood depression, ADHD, intellectual disability
This observational study included 1 million children in the United Kingdom and looked at the association between children who are younger than their classmates and the likelihood of depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability.
When it comes to robots, reliability may matter more than reasoning
What does it take for a human to trust a robot?
Scientists decode DNA of coral and all its microscopic supporters
Scientists have seen for the first time how corals collaborate with other microscopic life to build and grow.
Changes in internal medicine subspecialty choices of women, men
This study used enrollment data to examine changes in the internal medicine subspecialty choices of women and men from 1991 to 2016.
NASA satellite imagery shows wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Jerry
Forecasters use a variety of satellite imagery to understand what's happening in a storm, and sometimes just a visible picture can tell a lot.
UCI study reveals critical role of brain circuits in improving learning and memory
A University of California, Irvine-led team of scientists has discovered how newly identified neural circuits in the brain's hippocampal formation play a critical role in object-location learning and memory.
Task force provides insights and direction on cell-based therapies
A new report published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research and concurrently in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research highlights the latest advances in cell-based therapies for the treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system, such as arthritis and osteoporosis, and it identifies key unanswered questions that should be addressed through ongoing research.
Exploring the future of coal power in water scarce Asia
Many aspects of modern energy systems necessitate access to reliable water resources.
'Valley states' in this 2D material could potentially be used for quantum computing
New research on 2-dimensional tungsten disulfide (WS2) could open the door to advances in quantum computing.
Did Mosasaurs Do The Breast Stroke?
Mosasaurs were true sea monsters of late Cretaceous seas. These marine lizards -- related to modern snakes and monitor lizards -- grew as long as fifty feet, flashed two rows of sharp teeth, and shredded their victims with enormous, powerful jaws.
Thinner shells for delivering gentler therapeutic bursts
Releasing drugs that are packaged into microcapsules requires a significant amount of force, and the resulting burst can cause damage to human tissues or cause blood clots.
NASA finds heavy rain potential in Tropical Storm Hikaa
The Northern Indian Ocean has generated a new tropical cyclone.
Machu Picchu: Ancient Incan sanctuary intentionally built on faults
The ancient Incan sanctuary of Machu Picchu is considered one of humanity's greatest architectural achievements.
Croc-like carnivores terrorised Triassic dinosaurs in southern Africa 210 million years ago
Giant, predatory croc-like animals that lived during the Triassic period in southern Africa preyed on early dinosaurs and mammal relatives 210 million years ago.
Nonverbal signals can create bias against larger groups
If children are exposed to bias against one person, will they develop a bias against that person's entire group?
Spanish researchers find a new promising therapeutic target for glioblastoma
Glioblastoma is the most frequent and aggressive brain cancer due to its ability to escape the immune system.
Discovery of novel cancer signaling mechanism and design of new anticancer compound
Active mutations of a certain signaling receptor protein called KIT tyrosine kinase are found in several cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
Is theory on Earth's climate in the last 15 million years wrong?
A key theory that attributes the climate evolution of the Earth to the breakdown of Himalayan rocks may not explain the cooling over the past 15 million years, according to a Rutgers-led study.
Nova Southeastern University Researcher urges use of microbes for space colonization
Before we go colonizing other planets, NSU researcher says we should drop in some microbes first -- they are essential for human survival.
New augmented reality head mounted display offers unrivalled viewing experience
Cambridge engineers have developed a new augmented reality (AR) head-mounted display (HMD) that delivers a realistic 3D viewing experience, without the commonly associated side effects of nausea or eyestrain.
Chromosomal changes implicated in disease linked to social and economic disadvantage
Chromosomal changes implicated in disease are linked to social and economic disadvantage, finds a study of 473 families, published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics.
Soap from straw -- Scientists develop eco friendly ingredient from agricultural waste
A scientist has discovered a way of using one of the world's most abundant natural resources as a replacement for manmade chemicals in soaps and thousands of other household products.
Up-close and personal with neuronal networks
Researchers from Harvard University have developed an electronic chip that can perform high-sensitivity intracellular recording from thousands of connected neurons simultaneously.
How molecular footballs burst in an x-ray laser beam
An international research team has observed in real time how football molecules made of carbon atoms burst in the beam of an X-ray laser.
Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.
2019 Arctic sea ice minimum tied for second lowest on record
The extent of Arctic sea ice at the end of this summer was effectively tied with 2007 and 2016 for second lowest since modern record keeping began in the late 1970s.
Cats are securely bonded to their people, too
Cats have a reputation for being aloof and independent. But a study of the way domestic cats respond to their caregivers suggests that their socio-cognitive abilities and the depth of their human attachments have been underestimated.
Study finds onion and garlic consumption may reduce breast cancer risk
In the first population-based study to examine the association between onion and garlic consumption and breast cancer in Puerto Rico, UB and University of Puerto Rico researchers found that women who ate sofrito more than once per day had a 67% decreased breast cancer risk.
Heavy rainfall found in Tropical Storm Lorenzo by NASA
NASA calculated the rainfall rates in the Atlantic Ocean's newest tropical cyclone, Lorenzo.
'Push-pull' dynamic in brain network is key to stopping seizures
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered that the spreading of seizures through the brain can be suppressed depending on the amount of pressure within the brain, an important discovery that may revolutionize the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy.
Mummy study: Heart disease was bigger issue for human ancestors than initially thought
A new imaging study of the mummified arteries of people who lived thousands of years ago revealed that their arteries were more clogged than originally thought, according to a proof-of-concept study led by a researcher with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
Non-viral gene therapy to speed up cancer research
A new treatment method promises to speed up gene therapy research and could bring new, patient friendly cancer treatments to market faster.
NASA satellite identified a less-organized Caribbean Tropical Storm Karen
Satellite imagery can be used to peer inside a storm as well as assess the storm's outside shape to give forecasters understanding of what's happening to it.
Light-activated metal catalyst destroys cancer cells' vital energy source
A space-age metal that formed part of the asteroid that destroyed the dinosaurs could provide a new method of treating cancer tumors selectively using light.
Synchronised or independent neurons: this is how the brain encodes information
'Like a group of people who whistle a very similar tune': It is the phenomenon of 'co-relation', in which individual neurons do not always act as independent units in receiving and transmitting information but as groups of individuals with similar and simultaneous actions.
Discovery of sorghum gene that controls bird feeding could help protect crops
A single gene in sorghum controls bird feeding behavior by simultaneously regulating the production of bad-tasting molecules and attractive volatiles, according to a study publishing Sept.
Otago study first to report benefits and safety of FODMAP diet in children
The low FODMAP diet, a diet low in carbohydrates that trigger digestive symptoms like bloating and stomach pain, is a useful treatment in children and adolescents with gastrointestinal problems, new University of Otago research confirms.
New study on sharing shows social norms play a role in decision making
A child's desire to share becomes influenced by social norms around the age of 8, new research has revealed.
Use, discontinuation of insulin treatment among older adults
Whether insulin treatment was used less frequently and discontinued more often among older adults (ages 75 to 79) in poor health compared with those in good health was the focus of this observational study that included more than 21,000 adults with type 2 diabetes.
Scientists hone in on DNA differences behind immune diseases
Scientists are one step closer to discovering the causes of immune diseases such as asthma, multiple sclerosis and arthritis.
NASA catches Tropical Storm Lorena's landfall approach
As Tropical Storm Lorena was nearing landfall in northwestern Mexico, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the storm.
AGA releases guideline on the evaluation of chronic diarrhea
Diagnosing patients with chronic watery diarrhea can be difficult for health care providers, since several causes with specific therapies, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), microscopic colitis and chronic infection, need to be ruled out.
A new way to turn heat into energy
An international team of scientists has figured out how to capture heat and turn it into electricity.
NASA-NOAA satellite sees a tight circulation in Tropical Storm Kiko
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite imagery revealed that Tropical Storm Kiko had a tight circulation center.
New CRISPR class expands genetic engineering toolbox
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have used a previously unexplored CRISPR technology to accurately regulate and edit target genes in human cells.
Better samples, better science: new study explores integrity of research specimens
Biological samples can be highly susceptible to changes over time, which often occur when they are removed from deep refrigeration.
Children exposed to secondhand smoke at higher risk for atrial fibrillation
Children of parents who smoke had a significantly increased chance of developing atrial fibrillation later in life, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Hypertension during pregnancy can increase later risk of heart disease
Research published today in the journal Circulation has found that women with high blood pressure in pregnancy, including conditions such as preeclampsia, have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disorders later in life, including stroke and heart failure.
Uncovering hidden intelligence of collectives
Research team including scientists from Konstanz discovers that information processing in animal groups occurs not only in the brains of animals but also in their social network.
Obesity alert for October 2019
All print, broadcast and online journalists who receive the Obesity embargo alert agree to abide by the embargo and may not publish, post, broadcast or distribute embargoed news releases or details of the embargoed studies before the embargo date and time.
QUT researchers use AI to bring sharper focus to eye testing
Researchers at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia have applied artificial intelligence (AI) deep learning techniques to develop a more accurate and detailed method for analysing images of the back of the eye to help clinicians better detect and track eye diseases, such as glaucoma and aged-related macular degeneration.
Older adults with COPD more likely to use synthetic cannabinoids, study finds
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that's often associated with a variety of health problems, including chronic muscle pain and insomnia.
Cancer protocols: A new approach to predicting treatment outcomes
Weizmann Institute of Science research shows heterogeneity in melanoma tumors prevents effective immune responses.
Engineered killer T cells could provide long-lasting immunity against cancer
In experiments with mice, UCLA researchers have shown they can harness the power of iNKT cells to attack tumor cells and treat cancer.
Method discovered to reactivate tumour fighting genes 'silenced' by cancer
Scientists at UCL have developed a method to reactivate 'tumour suppressor' genes, which are switched off by cancer cells -- a finding which could lead to new targeted biotherapies for cancer.
Industry has unduly influenced TV advertising regs on restricting unhealthy kids' foods
Industry has unduly influenced the regulations for TV advertising of unhealthy foods to children, likely weakening legislation in this area, argue doctors in an analysis, published in the online journal BMJ Open.
Researchers resolve how fungi produce compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications
Research led by the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has solved a nearly 50-year-old mystery of how nature produces a large class of bioactive chemical compounds.
How the brain repurposes unused regions
In adults that are born blind, the 'visual' cortex is activated in a similar way during a listening task, according to new research in JNeurosci.
What color were fossil animals?
Dr. Michael Pittman of the Vertebrate Palaeontology Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong led an international study with his PhD student Mr.
Capturing extreme close-ups of cellular gene expression
Scientists studying genetic transcription are gaining new insights into a process that is fundamental to all life.
For young athletes, sport specialization means increased risk of injury
Specialization in a chosen sport is associated with a higher volume of activity -- and it could increase young athletes' risk of sustaining both traumatic- and overuse-based injuries, new study says.
Discontinuing insulin for older adults with type 2 diabetes
Patients with type 2 diabetes who were in poor health were more likely to continue taking insulin after age 75 than their counterparts in better health, according to Kaiser Permanente research published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.
New report deepens understanding of wind-wildlife interactions
The Ecological Society of America (ESA) announces the publication of a new report, 'Impacts to Wildlife of Wind Energy Siting and Operation in the United States,' in ESA's Issues in Ecology publication.
Strip steak: Bacterial enzyme removes inflammation-causing meat carbohydrates
When we eat red meat, the animal carbohydrate Neu5Gc is incorporated in our tissues, where it generates inflammation.
Cats, like children and dogs, develop attachments to their caregivers, study shows
Pet cats form attachments with their human owners that are similar to the bonds formed by children and dogs with their caretakers.
Probes shed new light on Alzheimer's cause
Rice University researchers have found a way to track the formation of soluble amyloid beta peptide aggregates in lab samples.
Study casts doubt on effectiveness of named GP scheme
An NHS scheme to give every patient aged 75 and over in England a named GP responsible for their care has failed to deliver hoped-for improvements, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care.
Graphene is 3D as well as 2D
Graphene is actually a 3D material as well as a 2D material, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.
Improvements to rheology measurements in reservoirs proposed by Kazan Federal University
The development and implementation of innovative integrated methods to increase oil recovery is one of the key approaches to solving existing problems in the oil industry.
Tiny, biocompatible laser could function inside living tissues
Researchers have developed a tiny nanolaser that can function inside of living tissues without harming them.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Making Amends
What makes a true apology? What does it mean to make amends for past mistakes? This hour, TED speakers explore how repairing the wrongs of the past is the first step toward healing for the future. Guests include historian and preservationist Brent Leggs, law professor Martha Minow, librarian Dawn Wacek, and playwright V (formerly Eve Ensler).
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.