Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 24, 2019


Stanford researchers find lead in turmeric
Some spice processors in Bangladesh use an industrial lead chromate pigment to imbue turmeric with a bright yellow color prized for curries and other traditional dishes, elevating blood lead levels in Bangladeshis.
Genome study shows that iran's population is more heterogeneous than previously believed
An international research endeavour has provided a genome-wide genetic characterization of the Iranian population, enabling further research on genetic diseases and historical migration movements / Publication in 'PLOS Genetics'
What wolves' teeth reveal about their lives
UCLA biologist discovers what wolves' broken teeth reveal about their lives.
The Lancet Digital Health: First systematic review and meta-analysis suggests artificial intelligence may be as effective as health professionals at diagnosing disease
Artificial intelligence (AI) appears to detect diseases from medical imaging with similar levels of accuracy as health-care professionals, according to the first systematic review and meta-analysis, synthesising all the available evidence from the scientific literature published in The Lancet Digital Health journal.
Self-silencing may lead to increased risk of stroke
Expressing your true feelings is not only good for your mental health, but it could also be important for your physical health.
Tool kit provides real world guidelines for counseling for weight loss in primary care
Healthcare practitioners and researchers have a new tool to combat obesity in primary care settings, according to a study published in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society.
More discussion needed about vulvovaginal health at well woman visits
Despite the wealth of information now available about menopause, women are still not comfortable in proactively discussing vaginal issues related to menopause with their healthcare providers, who appear equally uncomfortable and unlikely to initiate the conversation.
Menopausal night sweats linked with cognitive dysfunction
Experts frequently tout the value of a good night's sleep.
Tale of 2 climate crises gives clues to the present
Figuring out what lies ahead for our species and our planet is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks for climate scientists.
Brain stimulation prevents anxiety-induced decrease in motor performances
Researchers in the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology and the Centre national de la recherché scientifique used fMRI to discover a new neural mechanism involving the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex to explain how anxiety deteriorates physical performance.
Could we feed one million people living on mars?
A provocative new study looks at the resource utilization and technological strategies that would be needed to make a Mars population of one million people food self-sufficient.
Research could help flexible technology last longer, avoid critical failures
A new study from a Binghamton University research team uses the topography of human skin as a model not for preventing cracks but for directing them in the best way possible to avoid critical components and make repairs easy.
Chronic insomnia can be cured in cancer survivors with a basic sleep education class
In a study published online today by the journal Cancer, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute report that a single-session sleep education program for survivors can cure insomnia in many participants, and that those who don't benefit from this approach are often helped by a more extensive, but still modest, three-session program.
Simple lifestyle modifications key to preventing large percentage of breast cancer cases
Expert reports estimate that one in three breast cancer cases could be prevented by lifestyle modifications.
Safe solution to mop up oil spills: QUT research breakthrough
QUT researchers have come up with a new, safe way to clean up oil spills using compounds equally useful as common household cleaning products.
West Nile virus in the New World: Reflections on 20 years in pursuit of an elusive foe
Though eradication of West Nile virus remains beyond our capability, the body of knowledge built since its arrival in the Americas in 1999 is now powering efforts to minimize its impact and prepare for the invasion of other mosquito-borne diseases.
Vitamin D and fish oil show promise in prevention of cancer death and heart attacks
The VITamin D and OmegA-3 Trial (VITAL) is the largest and most recent to test whether vitamin D or fish oil can effectively prevent cancer or cardiovascular disease.
Hormone therapy linked to decrease level of diabetes biomarkers
The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) remains one of the most highly quoted when debating the benefits and risks of hormone therapy.
Evolution experiment: Specific immune response of beetles adapts to bacteria
The memory of the immune system is able to distinguish a foreign protein with which the organism has already come into contact from another and to react with a corresponding antibody.
NASA satellite looks at Tropical Storm Kiko's cloud heights, temperatures
NASA's Aqua Satellite provides a variety of data on tropical cyclones including cloud heights and cloud top temperatures.
Model helps choose wind farm locations, predicts output
The wind is always blowing somewhere, but deciding where to locate a wind farm is a bit more complicated than holding up a wet finger.
Deep brain stimulation for refractory severe tinnitus
Researchers investigated the safety and efficacy of deep brain stimulation in the treatment of refractory severe tinnitus in a small group of patients.
Study finds potential therapeutic target for prostate cancers with PTEN mutation
PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene mutated in about 20% of prostate cancers, relies on another gene, ARID4B, to function.
Why do estradiol levels vary among women using hormone therapy?
CLEVELAND, Ohio (September 24, 2019)--The benefits of hormone therapy (HT) on atherosclerosis relates to achieved estradiol levels among those women who initiate HT early in postmenopause.
Commit a crime? Loved ones got your back
Reading about a child abuse case or someone burglarizing homes often stirs feelings of disgust, anger and disbelief when it's learned the perpetrator's family or friends did nothing to stop it or report it to police.
Battery with a twist
Markus Niederberger's team of researchers at ETH has used stretchable materials to develop a battery that can be bent, stretched and twisted.
Converting absorbed photons into twice as many excitons: Successful high-efficiency energy conversion with organic monolayer on gold nanocluster surface
A group of researchers from Kobe and Keio universities found that when light was exposed to the surface of a tetracene alkanethiol-modified gold nanocluster, which they developed themselves, twice as many excitons could be converted compared to the number of photons absorbed by the tetracene molecules.
Veterans with mental health conditions have higher risk of heart disease, stroke
Specific mental health disorders -- depression, anxiety, psychosis and bipolar disorder -- pose an increased risk of heart attack, stroke and death from cardiovascular disease.
Child abuse associated with physiologically detected hot flashes
Childhood abuse has been shown to lead to an array of health problems later in life.
Microbes are a key marker of vaginal health during menopause
Certain species of bacteria are actually necessary to maintain vaginal health.
Outer hair cells regulate ear's sensitivity to sound
The ear's tiny outer hair cells adjust the sensitivity of neighboring inner hair cells to sound levels rather than acting like an amplifier, suggests a new study published today in eLife.
New Mersey designs show tidal barriers bring more benefits than producing clean energy
When designed holistically, tidal barrage schemes can provide additional transport links for commuters, become tourism destinations, mitigate wildlife habitat loss, as well as provide opportunities to boost people's health and wellbeing with additional options for cycling and walking, say researchers from Lancaster University and the University of Liverpool.
Modest improvements in diets of US adults but still too much sugar, saturated fat
US adults made modest improvements to their diets in recent years but still eat too much low-quality carbohydrates and saturated fat based on an analysis of nationally representative survey data.
Impostor syndrome is more common than you think; Study finds best way to cope with it
A new study from researchers reveals that perceptions of impostorism are quite common both in the workplace and the classroom and uncovers one of the best ways to cope with such feelings: seeking social support from those outside their academic program.
Study shows the biological clock influences immune response efficiency
According to a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, the biological clock influences immune response efficacy.
Oncologists respond swiftly to FDA safety alerts, Penn study finds
Within six months of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) move to restrict the label of two immunotherapies, usage of those therapies among oncologists dropped by about 50 percent, according to a new study from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania.
Bird droppings defy expectations
Prevailing wisdom ranks uric acid as the primary ingredient in bird 'poop,' which is comprised mostly of urine.
More efficient drug delivery within the brain by utilizing LAT1
According to a new study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland, the distribution of drug molecules within the brain can be improved by utilizing LAT1, which is expressed highly in the brain.
Most California wildfire is in wildland-urban interface area with less fuel, more people
Homeowner guidance and fire behavior models are largely based on the idea that natural grass, bushes and trees fuel fire in the wildland-urban interface (WUI).
Survey suggests elderly patients with diabetes may favor more aggressive blood sugar control
Survey results of a national sample of elderly people with type 2 diabetes suggest that many long-time patients downplay medical and social factors that underpin professional recommendations for fewer medications and less aggressive treatment of high blood sugar.
PolyU develops a new class of antibiotic candidates for fighting against superbugs
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a new class of antibiotic drug candidates which has high potential to be developed into a new generation of antibiotics fighting against multi-drug resistant superbugs including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).
Researchers can now place single ions into solids
New technique enables implantation of individual ions into crystals with an accuracy of 35 nanometers.
NASA-NOAA satellite finds wind shear taking a toll on tropical storm Jerry
Tropical Storm Jerry continued to weaken as warnings were in effect for Bermuda on Sept.
New discoveries map out CRISPR-Cas defence systems in bacteria
For the first time ever, researchers at the University of Copenhagen have mapped how bacterial cells trigger their defense against outside attacks.
Cellular senescence is associated with age-related blood clots
Cells that become senescent irrevocably stop dividing under stress, spewing out a mix of inflammatory proteins that lead to chronic inflammation as more and more of the cells accumulate over time.
'Treasure trove' of quake clues could be unearthed by wavy new technique
Geologists have improved upon methods to map seabed rocks, helping us better understand underwater earthquakes and the tsunamis they can cause.
Promising prostate cancer drug candidates identified by Bath scientists
Cancer researchers from the University of Bath have identified some promising drug candidates by using high-throughput screening methods to test tens of thousands of molecules.
Do children's brains really get thinner?
The brains of young children get thinner as they grow.
Naming of new interstellar visitor: 2I/Borisov
A new object from interstellar space has been found within the Solar System, only the second such discovery of its kind.
Lifestyle coaching proves effective in decreasing body fat and waist size
Losing weight during and after menopause is not easy, but it's not impossible, either.
Survey reveals low levels of awareness in men about prostate health and function
Awareness of prostate health is alarmingly low in men over 50, a new survey commissioned by the European Association of Urology (EAU) has revealed, despite the fact that at the age of 60 and over, 40 percent of men suffer from an enlarged prostate.
'Report card' on diet trends: Low-quality carbs account for 42 percent of a day's calories
An 18-year 'report card' on the American diet shows adults are eating too many low-quality carbohydrates and more than the recommended daily amount of saturated fat.
Iridium 'loses its identity' when interfaced with nickel
Hey, physicists and materials scientists: You'd better reevaluate your work if you study iridium-based materials -- members of the platinum family -- when they are ultra-thin.
Hook-on drugs: New delivery strategy for K-Ras disruption
Dr. Ohkanda succeeded in designing a compound to hook onto the pocket of the enzyme FTase and GGTase I, thereby inhibiting K-Ras.
Symbiosis as a tripartite relationship
While viruses are typically known for their pathogenic properties, new research findings now also demonstrate a positive influence of bacteriophages on the interaction of host organisms with bacteria.
Exercise prior to breast cancer associated with lower risk for heart disease
Older breast cancer patients who exercised before being diagnosed may be at a lower risk for cardiovascular disease compared to those who did not, according to a study published today in the inaugural issue of JACC: CardioOncology.
We are all mutants, more or less
Everyone is a mutant but some are prone to diverge more than others, report scientists at University of Utah Health.
Job sharing can boost number of women in senior higher education roles
Research from Lancaster University Management School, shows job sharing offers a route to increase the number of women in senior leadership roles in higher education.
New standard of reference for assessing solar forecast proposed
Being able to accurately forecast how much solar energy reaches the surface of the Earth is key to guiding decisions for running solar power plants and new work in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy looks to provide a standard of reference to the field.
Pivotal role found for IgG autoantibodies in IgA nephropathy
A study largely validates the hypothesis that immunoglobulin IgG is a crucial part of the pathogenic immunodeposits in glomeruli of patients with IgA nephropathy.
West Africa: human-induced air pollution is higher than expected
Emissions of volatile organic pollutants in West Africa are 100 to 150 times higher than current estimates for the region.
Hot flashes shown to be linked to increased risk of later cardiovascular disease events
Previous studies suggested an association between hot flashes and cardiovascular (CVD) disease.
UMass Amherst climate scientist contributes to IPCC session
This week, representatives of 195 member governments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are meeting in Monaco with dozens of climate scientists who have prepared a draft 'Summary for Policymakers' of their 'Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC).' UMass Amherst climate scientist Robert DeConto, one of the lead authors and contributor to the report, is there in the working plenary session and will be available for reporters and media to discuss findings after it is final.
Scientists and key figures develop vision for managing UK land and seas after Brexit
A team of researchers, led by scientists at the University of York, consulted with key figures from the agriculture and fishing industries nationwide to produce a framework for managing land and seas after the UK has left the EU.
New technique to improve ductility of ceramic materials for missiles, engines
Purdue University researchers have developed a new process to help overcome the brittle nature of ceramics and make it more ductile and durable.
Exploring a strategy that leads to mutual cooperation without non-cooperative actions
A research team led by Hitoshi Yamamoto from Rissho University analyzed which strategies would be effective in the prisoner's dilemma game, into which a new behavior of not participating in the game was introduced.
Mice, like humans, fidget when deep in thought
By measuring the brain activity of mice during decision making, neuroscientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory observed that like humans, mice also seemed to fidget, or make uninstructed movements unrelated to the trained task.
Gum disease linked with higher risk of hypertension
People with gum disease (periodontitis) have a greater likelihood of high blood pressure (hypertension), according to a study published today in Cardiovascular Research, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
Cheaper drug just as effective protecting heart in duchenne muscular dystrophy
A new clinical trial conducted by Ohio State University found a cost-effective generic drug works just as well as a more expensive drug in preserving heart function in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
Racial/ethnic mortality disparities widen among many age groups
Years of progress towards reducing disparities in racial/ethnic group mortality rates in the United States came to a halt between 2009 and 2012, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
Global liquidity shocks impact house prices
New research from Cass Business School has found that global liquidity shocks do impact house prices in both emerging and advanced economies but this can be mitigated by government policy.
USPSTF recommendation on screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening people who are pregnant for asymptomatic bacteriuria (bacteria in the urine without signs or symptoms of a urinary tract infection) using urine culture and not screening other adults.
Diabetes drug study explores cardiovascular risks for patients with kidney disease
Among the 30 million U.S. adults with Type 2 diabetes, 20% have impaired kidney function.
Missing electrons reveal the true face of a new copper-based catalyst
A collaboration between researchers from Cornell, Harvard, Stanford and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has resulted in a reactive copper-nitrene catalyst that pries apart carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds and transforms them into carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bonds, which are a crucial building block for chemical synthesis, especially in pharmaceutical manufacturing.
Some high-cholesterol genes differ between countries
Some of the genes that predict the risk of high cholesterol don't apply to people from Uganda the same as they do in European populations, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature Communications.
Wistar receives over $12M for clinical research on opioid use in HIV-infected people
Wistar was awarded 2 major grants totaling more than $12 million from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, to fund an international multidisciplinary clinical research consortium spearheaded by Wistar's HIV Research Program.
HSS researchers identify factor essential for tendon growth
Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is essential for allowing tendons to adapt to physical activity and grow properly, according to basic science research by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS).
Low body-mass index with abdominal obesity is associated with worse heart failure outcomes in Asian
Having a lower body-mass index (BMI), but also having a higher waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), is associated with worse outcomes among Asian patients with heart failure, according to a study published Sept.
Hurricane resilience in the Bahamas
A new Stanford-led study provides information on how to invest in natural coastal ecosystems that the Bahamian government, community leaders and development banks are applying in post-disaster recovery and future storm preparation in the Bahamas.
Jackdaws learn from each other about 'dangerous' humans
Jackdaws can learn from each other to identify 'dangerous' humans, new research shows.
How and when was carbon distributed in the Earth?
A magma ocean existing during the core formation is thought to have been highly depleted in carbon due to its high-siderophile (iron loving) behavior.
Tapeworms need to keep their head to regenerate
Scientists have identified the stem cells that allow tapeworms to regenerate and found that their location in proximity to the head is essential, according to a new study in eLife.
Visible from outer space, Detroit's unofficial pathways could play important role in land redevelopment
As neighborhood and city planners design ways to reuse vacant land in cities like Detroit, a researcher at the University of Michigan is urging them to look at the footpaths of people who already live there -- literally.
Crappy news for the dung beetle and those who depend on them
You mightn't think that the life of a dung beetle, a creature who eats poop every day of its short life, could get any worse, but you'd be wrong.
Using light to speed up computation
Researchers in Japan have developed a type of processor called PAXEL, a device that can potentially bypass Moore's Law and increase the speed and efficiency of computing.
Getting mac and cheese to Mars
Washington State University scientists have developed a way to triple the shelf life of ready-to-eat macaroni and cheese, a development that could have benefits for everything from space travel to military use.
Decoding a new sign in chromatin maze:
A research team led by Dr Xiang David Li, Associate Professor from the Department of Chemistry revealed a new fundamental mechanism by which a cell can make necessary changes in its chromatin structure in response to different DNA-associated processes such as gene expression and DNA damage repair.
Exploring the risk of ALL in children with Down syndrome
Researchers discovered new clues that provide a better understanding of why children with Down syndrome have an increased risk of leukemia.
Quality control in immune communication: Chaperones detect immature signaling molecules
The cells of our immune system constantly communicate with one another by exchanging complex protein molecules.
Traditional fisherfolk help uncover ancient fish preservation methods
Archaeologists have little insight into the methods used for the long-term processing and preservation of fish in the past.
New model proposes jets go superluminal in gamma-ray bursts
Blasts that create gamma-ray bursts may actually exceed the speed of light in surrounding gas clouds, but do so without violating Einstein's theory of relativity.
Tobacco giants still marketing cigarettes despite plain packaging legislation
The study from Bath's Tobacco Control Research Group suggests governments implementing legislation for plain packaging for cigarettes need to close loopholes.
New mechanisms that regulate pluripotency in embryonic stem cells are discovered
A study by researchers at the Center for Cell-Based Therapy, which is supported by FAPESP, identified microRNAs involved in pluripotency maintenance and cell differentiation.
For baboons, a mother's history of hardship can have lasting effects on her kids too
Numerous studies show that children who had a rough start in life are more likely to have health problems later on.
Bats use private and social information as they hunt
As some of the most savvy and sophisticated predators out there, bats eavesdrop on their prey and even on other bats to collect a wide variety of information as they hunt.
Crystal growth kinetics and its link to evolution
The research group of Dr. Igor Zlotnikov from the Center for Molecular Bioengineering (B CUBE) of TU Dresden demonstrate in its latest publication that the physics of materials has a strong impact on the possible structures that molluscan shells can produce.
NASA-NOAA satellite finds Cyclone Hikaa at Oman's coast
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Arabian Sea in the Northern Indian Ocean and provided forecasters with a view of Cyclone Hikaa's structure.
Discovery of how colorectal cancer drug works will help more patients
Some colorectal cancer patients with a certain gene mutation benefit from a chemotherapy drug called cetuximab, although the mechanism of how this drug worked was unknown.
Uc san diego researchers isolate switch that kills inactive HIV
University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers have identified a switch controlling HIV reproduction in immune cells which can eliminate dormant HIV reservoirs.
A healthy diet may help prevent kidney disease
In an analysis of published studies, a healthy dietary pattern was associated with a 30% lower incidence of chronic kidney disease.
The problem with promoting 'responsible dog ownership'
Dog welfare campaigns that tell people to be 'responsible owners' don't help to promote behaviour change, a new University of Liverpool report suggests.
Reconstructing the first successful lunar farside landing
A research team, headed by Prof. LI Chunlai from the National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences has published a full reconstruction of the Chang'E-4's landing.
Machine learning could offer faster, more precise results for cardiac MRI scans
Cardiac MRI scans can be read by AI (artificial intelligence) 186 times faster than humans, with comparable precision to experts.
Predicting epileptic seizures might be more difficult than previously thought
By studying the brain dynamics of 28 subjects with epilepsy, scientists demonstrated there is no evidence for a previously suspected warning sign for seizures known as 'critical slowing down,' which refers to characteristic changes in the behavior of a complex system that approaches a theoretical tipping point; when this point is exceeded, there can be impactful and devastating changes.
Large-scale enhanced recovery program improves outcomes for bariatric surgery patients
A large-scale implementation of a protocol to improve recovery of patients after weight-loss operations was found to reduce rates of extended hospitalization by almost half at 36 participating accredited bariatric surgery centers nationwide, according to a study published online ahead of print in the current issue of the journal Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.
Eyeballing a black hole's mass
There are no scales for weighing black holes. Yet astrophysicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have devised a new way for indirectly measuring the mass of a black hole, while also confirming its existence.
Improved mapping of Swedish genes
People -- or more specifically just Swedes -- are more like chimpanzees than previously known.
New algorithm expands neurologists' ability to assess for clot-removing procedure
An algorithm developed by faculty at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) can help physicians outside of major stroke treatment centers assess whether a patient suffering from ischemic stroke would benefit from an endovascular procedure to remove a clot blocking an artery.
Scientists observe how acoustic interactions change materials at the atomic level
By using sound waves, scientists have begun to explore fundamental stress behaviors in a crystalline material that could form the basis for quantum information technologies.
Seeing is believing: Eye-tracking technology could help make driving safer
'Keep your eyes on the road.' With the recent advances in vehicle-assisted safety technology and in-car displays, this old adage has a new meaning, thanks to two new applications of eye-tracking technology developed by researchers at the University of Missouri.
Breakthrough in understanding enzymes that make antibiotic for drug-resistant pathogen
One of the WHO's 3 critical priority pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii, for which new antibiotics are urgently needed is one step closer to being tackled, as researchers from the Department of Chemistry -- University of Warwick have made a breakthrough in understanding the enzymes that assemble the antibiotic enacyloxin.
Earnings of private european firms are more reliable than those of public firms
Conventional wisdom indicates that market discipline and transparency ensures that financial data of public firms are more reliable for potential investors than financial reports from private companies.
Outcomes of birth options after a previous cesarean section
A large cohort study of women who have had one or more previous cesarean sections suggests that attempting a vaginal birth in a subsequent pregnancy is associated with higher health risks to both the mother and the infant than electing for another cesarean.
Quantum destabilization of a water sandwich
When a thin layer of water is squeezed between two hydrophobic surfaces, the laws of classical physics break down.
New method provides better understanding of gene 'enhancers' work
Using anew method called Net-CAGE, researchers identified as many as 20,000 new enhancers in humans.
A new member in AIE family
Three molecules based on tetraphenyl-1,3-butadienes (TPBs) showed aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics and sensitive conformational properties, in which the emission wavelengths could be changed in different states, attributed to the phenyl groups at the 4-position of the 1,3-butadienes.
NASA sees Karen regain tropical storm status
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Caribbean Sea and used infrared light to obtain temperature information about Karen's cloud tops.
Improved mapping of Swedish genes from 1,000 individuals
People -- or more specifically just Swedes -- are more like chimpanzees than previously known.
UN researchers: Sustainable development goals only achievable through cross-disciplinary research
It is not possible to achieve the sustainable development goals (SDG) if science does not contribute with cross-disciplinary knowledge and understanding of how systems are interconnected.
NASA-NOAA satellite finds Tropical Storm Lorenzo organizing 
Tropical Storm Lorenzo continued to strengthen and appeared more organized on visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite.
Log-periodic quantum oscillations and discrete scale invariance in Dirac materials
Log-periodic quantum magneto-oscillations are observed in the magneto- and Hall resistance of the topological material HfTe5 crystals.
New synthetic polymer degradable under very mild acidic conditions
A new type of degradable synthetic polymer was prepared by Rh-catalyzed three-component polymerization of a bis(diazocarbonyl) compound, bis(1,3-diketone), and tetrahydrofuran.

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab