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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 27, 2019


Study shows nearly half of cancer patients who enter a comprehensive tobacco treatment program quit smoking
In the largest smoking cessation study of cancer patients to date, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that comprehensive tobacco treatment can help cancer patients successfully quit and abstain from smoking.
Life's building blocks may have formed in interstellar clouds
An experiment shows that one of the basic units of life -- nucleobases -- could have originated within giant gas clouds interspersed between the stars.
A laser, a crystal and molecular structures
Researchers have built a new tool to study molecules using a laser, a crystal and light detectors.
An artificial skin that can help rehabilitation and enhance virtual reality
EPFL scientists have developed a soft artificial skin that provides haptic feedback and -- thanks to a sophisticated self-sensing mechanism -- has the potential to instantaneously adapt to a wearer's movements.
New design of bioactive peptide nanofibers keeping both temperature reversibility and stiffness control
A collaboration mainly led by scientists from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan has developed a new method of molecular design to control both temperature reversibility and stiffness of nanofibers that are gel-forming peptides.
Salt shakers should carry tobacco-style health warning, say experts
Salt sold in supermarkets and salt shakers in restaurants should be required to carry a front-of-pack, tobacco-style health warning, according to The World Hypertension League and leading international health organisations.
Geometry goes viral: Researchers use maths to solve virus puzzle
A discovery, by researchers at the University of York (UK) and San Diego State University (US), paves the way for new insights into how viruses form, evolve and infect their hosts and may eventually open up new avenues in anti-viral therapy.
Men with prostate cancer can be spared radiotherapy after surgery
Men with prostate cancer can be spared radiotherapy after surgery, according to late breaking results of the RADICALS-RT trial presented at the ESMO Congress 2019 in Barcelona, Spain.
Converting CO2 to valuable resources with the help of nanoparticles
An international research team has used nanoparticles to convert carbon dioxide into valuable raw materials.
Your energy-efficient washing machine could be harboring pathogens
For the first time ever, investigators have identified a washing machine as a reservoir of multidrug-resistant pathogens.
Light in a new light
In a paper published today in Nature's NPJ Quantum Information, Omar Magaña-Loaiza, assistant professor in the Louisiana State University Department of Physics & Astronomy, and his team of researchers describe a noteworthy step forward in the quantum manipulation and control of light.
Why viruses like Herpes and Zika will need to be reclassified, and its biotech impact
New findings reveal many different structural models for viruses, which can eventually lead to developing more targeted antiviral vaccines, by improving our understanding of how viruses form, evolve and infect their hosts.
Teens sleep 43 more minutes per night after combo of 2 treatments, study finds
Teenagers got 43 more minutes of sleep a night after a four-week intervention that reset their body clocks and helped them go to bed earlier, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown.
NASA data stares into the eye of powerful hurricane Lorenzo
Satellite data has confirmed that Lorenzo is a major hurricane in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean with an impressive structure.
Architects have recreated the Puerta de Triana (Triana Gate) in Seville
In the 16th century, after the discovery of America and the creation of the Casa de la Contratación (House of Trade), Seville enjoyed a period of great splendour as the main port to the New World.
Analyses of newborn babies' head odors suggest importance in facilitating bonding
A team led by Kobe University Professor Mamiko Ozaki has become the first to identify the chemical makeup of the odors produced by newborn babies' heads.
Study finds age hinders cancer development
A new study, published in Aging Cell, has found that human ageing processes may hinder cancer development.
Longest coral reef survey to date reveals major changes in Australia's Great Barrier Reef
An in-depth look at Australia's Great Barrier Reef over the past 91 years concludes that since 1928 intertidal communities have experienced major phase-shifts as a result of local and global environmental change, leaving few signs that reefs will return to their initial state in the near future.
Study examines impact of climate change on Louisiana's Houma tribe
Repeated disasters and environmental changes on Louisiana's Gulf Coast are rapidly eroding the land, and along with it, an Indigenous tribe's ability to sustain its culture, health and livelihoods, new research suggests.
Men can be spared radiotherapy after surgery
Men with prostate cancer can be spared radiotherapy after surgery, according to late breaking results from a study led by The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust.
Lipid produced by organism helps control blood sugar
Blood sugar levels in obese mice were controlled more efficiently when the mice were challenged with a glucose overload and treated with 12-HEPE, a lipid produced in response to cold by brown adipose tissue.
Genetic markers linked to the start of symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Researchers from the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro), Hospital Clínic and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) have identified a group of genetic variants related to the starting point of Parkinson's disease.
Immunologists identify T cell homing beacons for lungs
Immunologists have identified a pair of molecules critical for T cells to travel to and populate the lungs.
African American children respond differently to asthma medications
African Americans suffer asthma more often and more severely than Caucasian patients.
Thermal siphon effect: heat flows from low temperature to high temperature
In this work, researchers study (both thermal and electric) energy transport in physical networks that rewired from 2D regular lattices.
Optimism associated with lower risk of heart disease, early death
Optimism was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and less risk of overall death in this observational study.
Common nutrient supplementation may hold the answers to combatting Al
In a new study, Biodesign researchers reveal that a lifelong dietary regimen of choline holds the potential to prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Study examines alcohol consumption, risk of dementia in older adults
This observational study examined alcohol consumption and the risk of dementia and cognitive decline in older adults with or without mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
NASA Satellite finds Karen holding onto tropical storm status
NASA's Terra Satellite provides a variety of data on tropical cyclones including cloud heights and cloud top temperatures.
NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Depression 19W organizing
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center with a view of Tropical Depression 19W's structure that helped confirm it is now a depression.
Oldest galaxy protocluster forms 'queen's court'
Using the Subaru, Keck, and Gemini Telescopes, an international team of astronomers has discovered a collection of 12 galaxies which existed about 13.0 billion years ago.
First large-scale study of universal screening for autism raises questions about accuracy
In the first large, real-world study of universal screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in toddlers, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that the most widely used and researched screening tool is less accurate than shown in previous studies conducted in research laboratory settings.
Study finds safe mercury levels in Kotzebue Sound fish
A new analysis of Kotzebue Sound fish has found that mercury levels in a variety of its subsistence species are safe for unrestricted consumption.
Smoking cessation program for patients with, without cancer
A tobacco treatment program delivered at a cancer center had average seven-day smoking abstinence rates of about 45% at three- and six-month follow-ups and nearly 44% at the nine-month follow-up, and those rates didn't differ between patients with and without cancer.
Physicists found weak spots in ceramic/graphene composites
Physicists and materials scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University found out the structures in nanomaterials made of ceramic and graphene plates, in which cracks appear most frequently.
CCNY physicists score double hit in LED research
In 2 breakthroughs in the realm of photonics, City College of New York graduate researchers are reporting the successful demonstration of an LED (light-emitting diode) based on half-light half-matter quasiparticles in atomically thin materials.
Sleep varies by age, geographical location and gender
In an exceptionally extensive worldwide study on sleep, nearly a quarter of a million nights of sleep were measured among sleepers ranging between 16 and 30 years of age.
High-speed microscope illuminates biology at the speed of life
The Columbia team behind the revolutionary 3D SCAPE microscope announces today a new version of this high-speed imaging technology.
Better methods needed for predicting risk of liver disease
While blood samples can reliably identify people with a low risk of developing severe liver disease, better methods are needed in primary care for identifying people in most need of care.
For this ocean dweller, ability to respond to warming waters is about location
A new study by UConn researchers seeks to tease out some of the myriad pressures that drive adaptation in small, widely dispersed marine animals called copepods.
Novel nanogels hold promise for improved drug delivery to cancer patients
UT Austin engineers develop multifunctional nanoscale gels for more precise delivery of therapeutic cancer treatments.
Simulations characterize turbulence caused by common connection for dialysis
The complex interplay among the arteriovenous grafts, the vessels they connect, and the blood they transport has been difficult to simulate, but one new method provides a way.
Ultrasound yields similar cancer detection rates after digital mammography, tomosynthesis
An ahead-of-print article in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) comparing dense breast ultrasound (US) screening after digital mammography (DM) versus after digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) yielded 'no significant difference' in additional cancer detection rate.
Researchers make it possible for ultrasound to reveal gene expression in the body
Mikhail Shapiro's lab develops technique for imaging mammalian gene expression with ultrasound for the first time by combining human bacteria and virus DNA
Cancer tumours form surprising connections with healthy brain cells
Anti-epileptic medicine can curb the dangerous communication and possibly be part of future treatment.
Giant exoplanet around tiny star challenges understanding of how planets form
An international team of researchers with participation from the University of Göttingen has discovered the first large gas giant orbiting a small star.
Study helps surgeons determine optimal approach for broken hips
Robert Zura, MD, Chair of Orthopaedics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, was part of an international collaborative study group whose findings will help orthopaedic surgeons identify the best individual approach to treat broken hips in those over age 50.
UTSW researchers identify molecule linking weight gain to gut bacteria
Good bacteria that live in the guts of mammals program the metabolic rhythms that govern the body's absorption of dietary fat.
Are humans preventing flies from eavesdropping?
Soundscapes may influence the evolution of tightly co-evolved host-parasitoid relationships.
Landscape patterns matter
The size, shape, and arrangement of fields, forests, wetlands, and human populations, and the ways these and other features interact and change across landscapes, have a multitude of implications for resource sustainability, ecosystem health, habitat connectivity, and other societal values.
Using math to blend musical notes seamlessly
MIT researchers have invented an algorithm that produces a real-time portamento effect, gliding a note at one pitch into a note of another pitch, between any two audio signals, such as a piano note gliding into a human voice.
Many gas giant exoplanets waiting to be discovered
There is an as-yet-unseen population of Jupiter-like planets orbiting nearby Sun-like stars, awaiting discovery by future missions like NASA's WFIRST space telescope, according to new models of gas giant planet formation by Carnegie's Alan Boss, described in an upcoming publication in The Astrophysical Journal.
Turning heat into electricity: A new thermoelectric material developed at FEFU
Young scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) developed the concept and manufactured samples of a new thermoelectric material -- biphase nanoceramics based on strontium titanate SrTiO3 and titanium oxide TiO2.
Cellular aging is linked to structural changes in the brain
A new study now shows that if telomeres change in their length, that change is also reflected in our brain structure.
Harmful metals found in vapors from tank-style electronic cigarettes
A team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found the concentration of metals in electronic cigarette aerosols -- or vapor -- has increased since tank-style electronic cigarettes were introduced in 2013.

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