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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 30, 2019


Bateman's cowbirds
Researchers at Illinois have discovered that cowbirds conform to Bateman's Principle, despite investing no energy into parental care.
WVU study reveals falsification issues in higher education hiring processes
When concerns are expressed about distrust in science, they often focus on whether the public trusts research findings.
The Lancet journals: Papers at ERS Congress 2019
The following papers will be presented at the ERS Congress 2019, organised by the European Respiratory Society, in Madrid and published simultaneously in either The Lancet or The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journals.
The Lancet: 3-in-1 inhaler therapy can improve lung function and reduce asthma attacks
Patients with severe asthma which is not controlled with standard treatment -- leaving them at risk of severe asthma attacks -- could benefit from using a single inhaler combining three, instead of 2 therapies, according to two phase 3 randomized controlled trials with over 2,500 patients across 17 countries, published in The Lancet and simultaneously presented at the European Respiratory Society (ERS) Conference 2019.
'Good' cholesterol counters atherosclerosis in mice with diabetes
Increasing levels of a simplified version of 'good' cholesterol reversed disease in the blood vessels of mice with diabetes.
Georgia State research finds early life racial discrimination linked to depression, accelerated aging
Early life stress from racial discrimination puts African Americans at greater risk for accelerated aging, a marker for premature development of serious health problems and perhaps a shorter life expectancy, according to a study led by a Georgia State University psychology researcher.
Mesothelioma trial suggests immunotherapy as an alternative to chemotherapy
Patients with mesothelioma may gain similar benefit from immunotherapy as chemotherapy, and good responders may provide important clues to novel treatment for the thousands of new cases each year.
Treating adolescent obesity: The evidence behind behavioral, pharmacological, and weight loss surgery options
As rates of adolescent obesity continue to rise, choice of treatment needs to be guided by the severity of obesity, psychosocial factors, comorbidities and patient's age and pubertal status, according to a new paper published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
Targeted therapy slows progression of advanced prostate cancer
Data from the PROfound trial, presented at the ESMO Congress 2019, show that olaparib delayed cancer progression by about four months compared to new hormonal agents (enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate) in patients with metastatic, pre-treated prostate cancer whose cancer cells had faulty DNA repair genes.
Statins could increase or decrease osteoporosis risk -- the dosage makes the difference
A study by the Medical University of Vienna and the Complexity Science Hub Vienna shows for the first time a connection between the dosage of cholesterol-lowering drugs -- statins -- and the diagnosis of osteoporosis.
Modern chemo better than second targeted hormone therapy against resistant prostate cancer
A modern chemotherapy drug is more effective for men with advanced prostate cancer than a second targeted hormone therapy in patients who have stopped responding to treatment, a major clinical trial shows.
First targeted therapy for cholangiocarcinoma shows clinical benefit in phase III trial
New data have shown for the first time that targeted therapy can improve the outcome of patients diagnosed with advanced cholangiocarcinoma.
Great apes have you on their mind
For decades a fierce debate was raised on whether any nonhuman species possess the ability of 'Theory of Mind'.
Solar cells with new interfaces
Scientists from NUST MISIS (Russia) and University of Rome Tor Vergata found out that a microscopic quantity of two-dimensional titanium carbide called MXene significantly improves collection of electrical charges in a perovskite solar cell, increasing the final efficiency above 20%.
New tool provides critical information for addressing the global water crisis
There has been a critical gap in the ability to identify which households experience issues with reliably accessing safe water in sufficient quantities for all household uses, from drinking and cooking to bathing and cleaning -- until now.
Monthly phone check-in may mean less depression for families of patients with dementia
A monthly, 40-minute phone call from a non-clinical professional may suppress or reverse the trajectory of depression so frequently experienced by family members caring for patients with dementia at home, according to a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Blood test can replace invasive biopsy for more patients with lung cancer
A growing number of patients with advanced lung cancer could soon be offered a blood test to help to decide the best treatment for them instead of having to get a tumour sample for analysis.
What did ancient crocodiles eat? Study says as much as a snout can grab
To study the diet of ancient crocodiles, two researchers--one from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and one from Stony Brook University--combined mathematical analyses of the animals' shapes, surveys of modern crocodiles' diet, modeling methods for reconstructing the diet of fossil groups, and forensic-style interpretations of damaged bones from the distant past.
Towards safer, more effective cancer radiation therapy using X-rays and nanoparticles
X-rays could be tuned to deliver a more effective punch that destroys cancer cells and not harm the body.
Which comes first: Smartphone dependency or depression?
New research suggests a person's reliance on his or her smartphone predicts greater loneliness and depressive symptoms, as opposed to the other way around.
Organoid research revealed at Neuroscience 2019
Mini-brains, also called organoids, may offer breakthroughs in clinical research by allowing scientists to study human brain cells without a human subject.
Cornell researchers reveal molecular basis of vision
Researchers have solved the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex involved in vertebrate vision at atomic resolution, a finding that has broad implications for our understanding of biological signaling processes and the design of over a third of the drugs on the market today.
Material for nuclear reactors to become harder
Scientists from NUST MISIS developed a unique composite material that can be used in harsh temperature conditions, such as those in nuclear reactors.
Type 2 diabetes remission possible with 'achievable' weight loss, say researchers
People who achieve weight loss of 10% or more in the first five years following diagnosis with type 2 diabetes have the greatest chance of seeing their disease go into remission, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge.
How meaning is represented in the human brain
Representations reflecting non-linguistic experience have been detected in brain activity during reading in study of healthy, native English speakers published in JNeurosci.
You don't have to go cold turkey on red meat to see health benefits
A new study has found that halving the amount red and processed (RPM) meat in the diet can have a significant impact on health, reducing the amount of LDL 'bad' cholesterol in the blood which cuts the risk of developing heart disease.
Simple cardiac risk score can predict problems with blood flow in the brain
The study shows that for those participants who do not have a history of heart disease or stroke that a simple cardiac risk score -- a summary measure of factors such as blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, abdominal fat, and dietary factors -- is associated with MRI-detected pre-clinical cerebrovascular disease like carotid artery plaque and silent strokes.
A new mechanism has been revealed which could lead to premature ageing in mother cells
This new mechanism makes it possible to understand premature ageing in cells with asymmetrical cell division, as is the case with mother cells.
Quantum material goes where none have gone before
Physicists have created a quantum material that can travel through a previously unexplored region marked by strange electronic properties.
Strained, symmetric, and new
Many natural compounds used in medicine have complex molecular architectures that are difficult to recreate in the lab.
People with anxiety may strategically choose worrying over relaxing
Relaxing is supposed to be good for the body and soul, but people with anxiety may actively resist relaxation and continue worrying to avoid a large jump in anxiety if something bad does happen, according to Penn State research.
New clinical trial analyses predict response to benralizumab by patients with COPD
New hypothesis-generating analyses of two international clinical trials named GALATHEA and TERRANOVA published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine and presented at the European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress 2019 in Madrid, Spain, identified clinical and physiological characteristics of patients with COPD that could help to identify people who are likely to have the greatest treatment effect with benralizumab.
Preparing for the future
Santa Barbara County residents love their coastline, from the small-town beaches of Carpinteria to Santa Barbara's waterfront to camping hotspots like Jalama Beach and dramatic Guadalupe Dunes.
Child deaths in Africa could be prevented by family planning
Children under 5 years of age in Africa are much more likely to die as a direct result of poor health linked to air pollution, unsafe water, lack of sanitation, increased family size, and environmental degradation, according to the first continent-wide investigation of its kind.
Cooking food alters the microbiome
Scientists at UC San Francisco and Harvard University have shown for the first time that cooking food fundamentally alters the microbiomes of both mice and humans, a finding with implications both for optimizing our microbial health and for understanding how cooking may have altered the evolution of the our microbiomes during human prehistory.
Discovered: Possible therapeutic target for slow healing of aged muscles
An age-related decline in recovery from muscle injury can be traced to a protein that suppresses the special ability of muscle stem cells to build new muscles, according to work from a team of current and former Carnegie biologists led by Chen-Ming Fan and published in Nature Metabolism.
Microbes in warm soils released more carbon than those in cooler soils
Simply by moving tropical soils down a mountainside into warmer environments, a team including Smithsonian scientists Andy Nottingham and Ben Turner discovered that much more CO2 may be released due to increased microbial activity as soils warm.
How to dismantle a nuclear bomb
MIT team successfully tests a new method for verification of weapons reduction.
Expanding Medicaid means chronic health problems get found & health improves, study finds
Nearly one in three low-income people who enrolled in Michigan's expanded Medicaid program discovered they had a common chronic illness that had never been diagnosed before, according to a new study.
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
A triple drug combination has been used to extend the lifespan of fruit flies by 48% in a new study led by UCL and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS),
A new method is designed to stop the growth of a fungus that affects over a hundred crops
The study, published in Nature, was able to 'trick' the pathogen by artificially applying a pheromone involved in its reproduction
First-time pregnancy complications linked to increased risk of hypertension later in life
Women who experience complications such as preterm births and preeclampsia during their first pregnancy are nearly twice more likely than women without complications to develop high blood pressure later in life -- some as quickly as 3 years later, according to a new study of more than 4,000 women.
Nanoparticles wiggling through mucus may predict severe COPD
In a proof-of-concept experiment, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully used microscopic man-made particles to predict the severity of patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by measuring how quickly the particles move through mucus samples.
First prostate cancer therapy to target genes delays cancer progression
For the first time, prostate cancer has been treated based on the genetic makeup of the cancer, resulting in delayed disease progression, delayed time to pain progression, and potentially extending lives in patients with advanced, metastatic prostate cancer, reports a large phase 3 trial.
Researchers develop program aimed at reducing dating violence among students
A program developed to encourage healthy relationships and reduce dating violence was effective among early middle school students, according to results of a study published in the American Journal of Public Health by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
Novel strategy using microRNA biomarkers can distinguish melanomas from nevi
Melanoma is the least common but one of the most deadly skin cancers.
Your video can ID you through walls with help of WiFi
Researchers in the lab of UC Santa Barbara professor Yasamin Mostofi have enabled, for the first time, determining whether the person behind a wall is the same individual who appears in given video footage, using only a pair of WiFi transceivers outside.
Prior DUI convictions among legal handgun purchasers associated with risk of later violent crimes
A study of legal handgun purchasers in California suggests convictions for driving under the influence (DUI) prior to a gun purchase may be associated with subsequent risk of arrest for violent crimes, including firearm-related ones.
Silicon technology boost with graphene and 2D materials
In a review published in Nature, ICFO researchers and collaborators report on the current state, challenges, opportunities of graphene and 2D material integration in Silicon technology.
Johns Hopkins researchers advance search for safer, easier way to deliver vision-saving gene therapy
In experiments with rats, pigs and monkeys, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have developed a way to deliver sight-saving gene therapy to the retina.
Best medications to reduce drooling for those with developmental disability
A new study has revealed the most effective medications to reduce drooling in young people with a developmental disability, which can affect their socialisation, relationships and community life.
FEFU scientists developed high-precision sensor based on laser-textured gold film
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with colleagues from Russia, Japan, and Australia have developed a multi-purpose sensor based on a specially designed gold film which surface contains millions of parabolic nanoantennas produced by femtosecond laser printing.
Do celiac families need 2 toasters?
Parents using multiple kitchen appliances and utensils to prevent their child with celiac disease from being exposed to gluten may be able to eliminate some cumbersome steps.
Study explains molecular mechanism of botanical folk medicines used to treat hypertension
Common herbs, including lavender, fennel and chamomile, have a long history of use as folk medicines used to lower blood pressure.
No need to cut down red and processed meat consumption
The researchers performed four systematic reviews focused on randomized controlled trials and observational studies looking at the impact of red meat and processed meat consumption on cardiometabolic and cancer outcomes.
A new concept could make more environmentally friendly batteries possible
A new concept for an aluminium battery has twice the energy density as previous versions, is made of abundant materials, and could lead to reduced production costs and environmental impact.
A new, natural wax coating that makes garments water-resistant and breathable
Aalto University researchers have made a non-toxic coating solution with wax obtained from Brazilian palm tree leaves.
Mechanisms of real-time speech interpretation in the human brain revealed
Scientists have come a step closer to understanding how we're able to understand spoken language so rapidly, and it involves a huge and complex set of computations in the brain.
Is this brain cell your 'mind's eye'?
No-one knows what connects awareness -- the state of consciousness -- with its contents, i.e. thoughts and experiences.
Women with asthma appear more likely to have lower levels of testosterone
Women with asthma appear more likely to have lower levels of 'free' (not attached to proteins) testosterone than women who do not have asthma, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
EPFL researchers invent low-cost alternative to Bitcoin
The cryptocurrency Bitcoin is limited by its astronomical electricity consumption and outsized carbon footprint.
Building a brighter way for capturing cancer during surgery
Bioengineer's smart surgical microscope shows promise for more accurately and quickly identifying cancer cells in the operating room.
Stanford researchers have developed a gel-like fluid to prevent wildfires
Scientists and engineers worked with state and local agencies to develop and test a long-lasting, environmentally benign fire-retarding material.
Helping tobacco plants save water
Eleni Stavrinidou and her research group at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have used bioelectronics to influence transpiration in a tobacco plant, without harming the plant in any way.
Growing old together: A sharper look at black holes and their host galaxies
The 'special relationship' between supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their hosts -- something astronomers and physicists have observed for quite a while -- can now be understood as a bond that begins early in a galaxy's formation and has a say in how both the galaxy and the SMBH at its center grow over time, according to a new study from Yale University.
BU finds physical therapy access may reduce opioid prescriptions
Low back pain is one of the most common conditions Americans seek care for--and one of the more common reasons for an opioid prescription.
The flagellar hook: Making sense of bacterial motility
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) show how bacteria transmit motion from an inner motor to an outer tail through a flexible joint in the flagellum known as the hook.
Teen study reveals how schools influence e-cigarette use, outlines prevention strategies
When e-cigarettes hit the US market in 2007, they were promoted as a safer, healthier alternative to traditional, combustible cigarettes.
Brave new world: Simple changes in intensity of weather events 'could be lethal'
Faced with extreme weather events and unprecedented environmental change, animals and plants are scrambling to catch up -- with mixed results.
Babies have fewer respiratory infections if they have well-connected bacterial networks
Microscopic bacteria, which are present in all humans, cluster together and form communities in different parts of the body, such as the gut, lungs, nose and mouth.
Fish fathers exhibit signatures of 'baby brain' that may facilitate parental care behavior
Many new parents are familiar with terms like 'baby brain' or 'mommy brain' that hint at an unavoidable decline in cognitive function associated with the hormonal changes of pregnancy, childbirth, and maternal caregiving.
Using high energy density material in electrode design enhances lithium sulfur batteries
To develop higher capacity batteries, researchers have looked to lithium sulfur batteries because of sulfur's high theoretical capacity and energy density.
In major meta-analysis, omega-3 fish oil supplements linked with lower cardiovasc
People who received omega-3 fish oil supplements in randomized clinical trials had lower risks of heart attack and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) events compared with those who were given placebo
ORNL scientists shed light on microbial 'dark matter' with new approach
Scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a way to isolate and grow targeted bacteria using genomic data, making strides toward resolving the grand challenge of uncultivated microbial 'dark matter' in which the vast majority of microorganisms remain unstudied in the laboratory.
Delivery system can make RNA vaccines more powerful
MIT chemical engineers have developed a new type of lipid nanoparticle that can be used to deliver RNA vaccines.
Potent antibody curbs Nipah and Hendra virus attack
A monoclonal antibody has been shown to impede the fusion machinery henipaviruses use to merge with the membrane of cells they are attempting to breach.
Researchers publish comprehensive review on respiratory effects of vaping
Corresponding author Rob Tarran, PhD, professor of cell biology and physiology and member of the UNC Marsico Lung Institute, said, 'Studies show measurable adverse biologic effects on lung health and cells in humans, in animals, and in tissue samples studied in the lab.
NASA finds Typhoon Mitag's eye east of Taiwan
NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Typhoon Mitag's cloud-filled eye, located east of Taiwan.
New biofabrication method creates one scaffold to guide regeneration of multiple tissues
Lesley Chow and her colleagues at Lehigh University have taken a major step to address the challenge of engineer tissues organized like native tissues.
Heart, kidney disease risk factors for adverse effects from gout medication
Heart disease is an independent risk factor for severe adverse skin reactions in patients taking allopurinol, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Collapse of desert bird populations likely due to heat stress from climate change
Last year, UC Berkeley biologists discovered that bird populations in the Mojave Desert had crashed over the past 100 years.
TAILORx: New data on cohort with recurrence score 26-100 shows 93% cancer-free rate at 5 years
In the prospective TAILORx trial, 93% of women with hormone-sensitive, HER2-negative, axillary node-negative breast cancer and a high Recurrence Score 26-100 were estimated to be cancer-free at five years.
Novel treatment combination for patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer
The triplet combination of the BRAF inhibitor, encorafenib, MEK inhibitor, binimetinib, and EGFR inhibitor, cetuximab, significantly improves overall survival and also increases objective response rates compared with standard of care in patients with BRAF V600E-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer.
Does being a 'superwoman' protect African American women's health?
A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers explores whether different facets of being a strong black woman, which researchers sometimes refer to as 'superwoman schema,' ultimately protect women from the negative health impacts of racial discrimination -- or cause more harm.
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria spread by washing machine
Antibiotic-resistant pathogens can be spread via washing machines. This has been proven by hygienists at the University of Bonn for a children's hospital in which a Klebsiella oxytoca type was repeatedly transmitted to newborns.
RUDN University chemists obtained new material for antibacterial food coatings
RUDN University chemists have developed a simple and convenient method for producing derivatives of the natural polymer chitosan.
Researchers find shorter sleep periods associated with obesity in African Americans
This study examined associations between the participants' body mass index (BMI) and their reported amounts of sleep, using data from 3,778 African American participants in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS).
Researchers fail to replicate influential neuroimaging genetics study
Neuroscientists have failed to replicate the findings of an influential study linking genetics to cognition.
Microneedle biosensor accurately detects patient's antibiotic levels in real time
Scientists have successfully used microneedle biosensors to accurately detect changes in antibiotic levels in the body, for the first time.
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP analyzes record-setting hurricane Lorenzo
Over the weekend of Sept. 28 and 29, Hurricane Lorenzo attained Category 5 strength briefly, becoming the strongest hurricane on record in the eastern-most Atlantic Ocean.
RUDN University mathematicians help improve efficiency of data centers using Markov chains
RUDN University mathematicians created a model of maximum efficiency of data centers.
How common is food insecurity among Medicare enrollees? 
Nearly 1 in 10 Medicare enrollees age 65 and over and 4 in 10 enrollees younger than 65 with long-term disabilities experience food insecurity.
Multifactor models reveal worse picture of climate change impact on marine life
Rising ocean temperatures have long been linked to negative impacts for marine life, but a Florida State University team has found that the long-term outlook for many marine species is much more complex -- and possibly bleaker -- than scientists previously believed.
German fishermen's scepticism towards EU impedes compliance with its regulations
Negative perception of a regulatory authority diminishes the honesty of those regulated.
Sleeping pills reduce suicidal thoughts in patients with severe insomnia
Insomnia is a driver of suicide, and particularly people with severe insomnia may safely benefit from taking a sedative to help address their sleep problems as it reduces their suicidal thoughts, investigators report.
AI system accurately detects key findings in chest X-rays of pneumonia patients within 10 seconds
From 20 minutes or more to 10 seconds. Researchers from Intermountain Healthcare and Stanford University say 10 seconds is about how quickly a new system they studied that utilizes artificial intelligence took to accurately identify key findings in chest X-rays of patients in the emergency department suspected of having pneumonia.
Borophene on silver grows freely into an atomic 'skin'
Borophene has a nearly perfect partner in a form of silver that could help the trendy two-dimensional material grow to unheard-of lengths.
Parent and sibling attitudes among top influences on teenage e-cigarette use
Flavor, safety and family attitude toward vaping are among the greatest factors influencing teenage perception of e-cigarettes, new University at Buffalo research finds.
Optoceutics: A new technique using light for regenerative medicine
Researchers in Italy at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia used visible light together with photo-sensitive and biocompatible materials to facilitate the formation of new blood vessels in vitro.
Secrets of the molecular makeup of cannabis
High levels of cannabidiol (CBD) in cannabis can offset the neuropsychiatric effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) by preventing activation of an emotional processing pathway, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.
How newly found tension sensor plays integral role in aligned chromosome partitioning
A Waseda University-led research found that oncogene SET/TAF1, which was found to be a proto-oncogene of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), contributes to proper chromosome partitioning as a tension sensor.
ESMO 2019: Breast and ovarian cancer drug outperforms targeted hormone therapy in some men
A drug used for breast and ovarian cancer is more effective than modern targeted hormone treatments at slowing progression and improving survival in some men with advanced prostate cancer, phase III clinical trial findings reveal.
Cannabis study reveals how CBD offsets the psychiatric side-effects of THC
Researchers at Western University have shown for the first time the molecular mechanisms at work that cause cannabidiol, or CBD, to block the psychiatric side-effects caused by tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive chemical in cannabis.
UBC study highlights need to improve health care access in Vancouver, Portland and Seattle
UBC researchers have developed a data science method that analyzes how easily citizens can access hospitals and walk-in health clinics -- and it's a tool that could eventually help city planners and policymakers build smarter, more equitable cities.
Pineapple genome sequences hint at plant domestication in a single step
An international team led by University of Illinois Professor of Plant Biology Ray Ming published their analysis of the genome of the red pineapple, a plant grown for fiber production and as an ornamental.
Turning Phoenix green
A group of researchers led by Arizona State University assessed how urban agriculture can help Phoenix meet its sustainability goals.
Handgun purchasers with a prior DUI have a greater risk for serious violence, study finds
Legal purchasers of handguns with a prior DUI conviction have a greater risk of a future arrest for a violent offense -- including murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault and for firearm-related violent crimes.
Artificial intelligence improves biomedical imaging
ETH researchers use artificial intelligence to improve quality of images recorded by a relatively new biomedical imaging method.
Skin-cells-turned-to-heart-cells help unravel genetic underpinnings of cardiac function
A small genetic study, published September 30, 2019 in Nature Genetics, identified a protein linked to many genetic variants that affect heart function.
Climate change could pit species against one another as they shift ranges
Species have few good options when it comes to surviving climate change--they can genetically adapt to new conditions, shift their ranges, or both.
Curved nanochannels allow independent tuning of charge and spin currents
To increase the efficiency of microchips, 3D structures are now being investigated.
New CRISPR-Cas9 variant may boost precision in gene editing
Researchers have developed a new variant of the gene editing technique CRISPR-Cas9 that has the potential to increase precision during gene therapy in humans.
'Relaxed' enzymes may be at the root of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
Treatments have been hard to pinpoint for a rare neurological disease called Charcot-Marie-Tooth, in part because so many variations of the condition exist.
Biologists track the invasion of herbicide-resistant weeds into southwestern Ontario
A team led by biologists from the University of Toronto have identified the ways in which herbicide-resistant strains of the invasive common waterhemp weed have emerged in fields of soy and corn in southwestern Ontario.
Purple martin migration behavior perplexes researchers
Purple martins will soon migrate south for their usual wintertime retreat, but this time the birds will be wearing what look like little backpacks, so scientists can track their roosting sites along the way.
Rolls wit'out: Developed in Drexel's Food Lab, new rolls help cut salt from Philly staple
Philadelphia Department of Public Health (PDPH) partnered with the Drexel Food Lab (DFL) to reformulate popular foods to contain less sodium, including a Philadelphia staple the hoagie roll, which led to a successful implementation in the public school system.
Veg 'nudge': an extra vegetarian option cuts meat consumption without denting food sales
First major study on ''nudging'' people towards sustainable diets. Replacing just one meat or fish dish with another veggie option in college cafeterias dramatically increased herbivorous dining while maintaining sales.
New AI Method May Boost Crohn's Disease Insight and Improve Treatment
Scientists have developed a computer method that may help improve understanding and treatment of Crohn's disease, which causes inflammation of the digestive tract.
Whole genome sequencing could enable personalised cancer treatment, study suggests
Whole genome sequencing of tumour cells could help predict the prognosis of a patient's cancer and offer clues to identify the most effective treatment, suggests an international study published today in Nature Medicine.
Curbing diesel emission could reduce big city mortality
US cities could see a decline in mortality rates and an improved economy through midcentury if federal and local governments maintain stringent air pollution policies and diminish concentrations of diesel freight truck exhaust, according to Cornell University research.
Underwater manatee chatter may aid in their conservation
Scientists propose a new method for calculating populations of the Antillean manatee, a marine mammal in danger of extinction, through underwater recordings.
High wealth inequality linked with greater support for populist leaders
People who live or think they live in a more economically unequal society may be more supportive of a strong, even autocratic leader, a large-scale international study shows.
NASA finds tropical storm Narda bringing heavy rainfall to western Mexico
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Narda along Mexico's west coast in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
This flat structure morphs into shape of a human face when temperature changes
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have designed 3-D printed meshlike structures that morph from flat layers into predetermined shapes, such as a human face, in response to changes in ambient temperature.

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