Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | October 01, 2019


New public-private research upends traditional carbon pricing and presents a more effective method for pricing emissions
Newly released public-private research proposes a new method for calculating carbon tax rates based on environmental, economic and social factors, including the costs the public pays for carbon usage such as damage to agriculture, vulnerable coastal infrastructure, and risk to human health.
Squid-inspired robots might have environmental, propulsion applications
Inspired by cephalopods, scientists developed an aquatic robot that mimics their form of propulsion.
Full-body interaction videogames enhance social skills in children with autism disorders
Communicating with others is one of the biggest difficulties for autistic children.
Stem cell treatments for shoulder and elbow injuries flourish, but so far there's little evidence they work
Two critical reviews in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, published by Elsevier, examine the current status of biologic approaches for common shoulder and elbow problems.
NUS researchers contribute to a Science paper on high-performance low-cost thermoelectrics
Researchers from the National University of Singapore and Beihang University reported the high-performance SnS thermoelectric crystals combining the desirable features of low-cost, earth-abundant materials and environmental friendliness.
No evidence that power posing works
Striking a power pose before an important meeting or interview is not going to boost your confidence or make you feel more powerful, says an Iowa State University researcher.
New species of parasite is identified in fatal case of visceral leishmaniasis
Phylogenomic analysis shows that pathogen isolated in Brazilian hospital does not belong to the genus Leishmania.
The hidden ark: How a grassroots initiative can help save fish from extinction
Freshwater fish are the most threatened vertebrate group, and species are disappearing faster than scientists can describe them.
Record breaking observations find most remote protocluster of galaxies
An international team of astronomers with participation by researchers from DAWN, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen has discovered a protocluster of galaxies 13.0 billion light years away.
How sustainable is tuna? New global catch database exposes dangerous fishing trends
In a study published in Fisheries Research, scientists from the Sea Around Us initiative found that global tuna catches have increased over 1,000 per cent in the past six decades, fueled by a massive expansion of industrial fisheries.
Room for improvement in drug dosage timing in hospitals
Study of 500K doses of 12 drugs led by Cincinnati Children's shows that hospitals provide medications according to staffing schedules rather than the ideal dosing times for their patients.
Beyond Einstein: Mystery surrounding photon momentum solved
According to Einstein, light consists of particles (photons) that transfer only quantised energy to the electron of the atom.
Early warning signals heralded fatal collapse of Krakatau volcano
On 22 December 2018, a flank of the Anak Krakatau plunged into the Sunda strait between the Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Java, triggering a tsunami that killed 430 people.
Study finds rising ozone a hidden threat to corn
By exposing a genetically diverse group of corn plants in the field to future ozone levels, researchers discovered hidden vulnerabilities.
Earthquake in the cell
Nuclear abnormalities such as nuclear blebs and micronuclei have devastating consequences for the genetic material and are associated with cancer or ageing.
NIH researchers develop MRI with lower magnetic field for cardiac and lung imaging condition
National Institutes of Health researchers, along with researchers at Siemens, have developed a high-performance, low magnetic-field MRI system that vastly improves image quality of the lungs and other internal structures of the human body.
Discovered new regulation for infant growth
Researchers at the University of Bergen in Norway have identified new genetic signals for the regulation of how infants grow.
Gene responsible for lutein esterification in bread wheat identified
Researchers have identified and confirmed the gene responsible for lutein esterification in bread wheat.
A brain protein that could put the brakes on Alzheimer's
University of California, Irvine biologists blazing new approaches to studying Alzheimer's have made a major finding on combating inflammation linked to the disease.
Geriatrics experts on gender equity in health care: 'When women rise, we all rise'
Putting power and potential behind gender equity in health care isn't just common sense.
The rise of deal collectives that punish profits
Deal collectives can be a liability for companies, especially when deal collectives regularly execute deals that result in pricing below cost.
Horse nutrition: Prebiotics do more harm than good
Prebiotics are only able to help stabilise the intestinal flora of horses to a limited degree.
Acute psychotic illness triggered by Brexit Referendum
Political events can take a serious toll on mental health, a doctor has warned in the journal BMJ Case Reports, after treating a man with a brief episode of acute psychosis, triggered by the 2016 Referendum on Brexit -- the process of the UK leaving the European Union (EU).
Barrier to rural opioid treatment: Driving distance to methadone clinics
People who live in rural counties in five states heavily affected by the opioid epidemic must drive longer distances to obtain methadone, a treatment for opioid addiction, compared to individuals from urban counties, say Yale researchers.
Study demonstrates antibody responses within 6 weeks of initial vaccination
Early phase clinical trial demonstrates that DNA (DNA-HIV-PT123) and protein (AIDSVAX® B/E) combination vaccine regimens induced high magnitude and long-lasting binding antibody responses and that more rapid potentially protective immune responses were observed when the vaccine regimens were co-administered.
Handling traumatic grief reactions in children and adolescents post-9/11
In the wake of the World Trade Center attack on September 11, 2001 (9/11), researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), New York defined the 'traumatically bereaved' as those who experienced the loss of a mother, father, sister, brother, grandmother, grandfather, aunt, uncle, other family member, friend, and/or someone else after 9/11 happened.
Just add water: simple step boosts polymer's ability to filter CO2 from mixed gases
An international team of researchers has found it can significantly boost an existing polymer's ability to selectively remove carbon dioxide out of gas mixtures by first submerging the material in liquid water.
Radiology organizations publish statement on ethics of AI in Radiology
Experts in the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology, from many of the world's leading radiology, medical physics and imaging informatics groups, today published an aspirational statement to guide the development of AI in radiology.
Product authentication at your fingertips
A team led by a chemist at the University of California, Riverside, has fabricated for the first time plasmonic color-switchable films of silver nanoparticles.
Genomic fluke close-up
A group led by Makedonka Mitreva at Washington University in St.
Can a donor voucher program broaden representation in local campaign financing?
A new study investigated the effectiveness of Seattle, WA's Democracy Voucher program in expanding participation from marginalized communities in a local election, where voters were each given four, twenty-five-dollar vouchers to assign to the local candidates of their choice.
Why multipartite viruses infect plants rather than animals
Being in between living and non-living, viruses are, in general, strange.
One third of patients with severe asthma are taking harmful doses of oral steroids
A third of patients with severe asthma are taking harmful doses of oral steroids, according to a study of several thousand people in The Netherlands, presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.
Collaboration may improve access to HIV testing, primary care
Getting better access to testing and proper primary care for individuals vulnerable to HIV could be as simple as a telephone call or email among health providers.
A metronome for quantum particles
Physicists in Vienna have found a way to measure the elusive quantum phase of electrons.
Fatal flaws in UK Government's price of a life
The measurement by which the UK Government attaches a monetary value to saving a human life is invalid and should be overhauled, according to Professor of Risk Management at the University of Bristol, Philip Thomas.
Mob mentality rules jackdaw flocks
Jackdaws are more likely to join a mob to drive off predators if lots of their fellow birds are up for the fight, new research shows.
New study links vitamin C therapy to better survival rates after sepsis
New research published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that patients with sepsis and septic lung injury could have a better chance of survival and recover more quickly when treated with vitamin C infusions.
High-fructose and high-fat diet damages liver mitochondria, study finds
High levels of fructose in the diet inhibit the liver's ability to properly metabolize fat.
Intriguing discovery provides new insights into photoelectric effect
The discovery that free electrons can move asymmetrically provides a deeper understanding of one of the basic processes in physics: the photoelectric effect.
Science proves that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger
Through advanced data analysis, researchers have established a causal relationship between failure and future success.
Revolutionary simple blood tests for diabetic complications, cancer
With a revolutionary new approach that analyzed just a few drops of blood, Northwestern Medicine scientists and international collaborators detected earlier and more accurately if diabetic patients had developed life-threatening vascular complications such as heart disease, atherosclerosis and kidney failure.
Researchers synthesize new liquid crystals allowing directed transmission of electricity
Liquid and solid - most people are unaware that there can be states in between.
Exposure to BPA in the womb linked to wheezing and poorer lung function in children
Pregnant women exposed to higher levels of the commonly used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) are more likely to have children who suffer with wheezing and poorer lung function, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.
Neuroimaging reveals hidden communication between brain layers during reading
Language involves many different regions of the brain. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and the Donders Institute at Radboud University discovered previously hidden connections between brain layers during reading, in a neuroimaging study reported in PNAS.
Study: Better sleep habits lead to better college grades
Two MIT professors have found a strong relationship between students' grades and how much sleep they're getting.
Mild-to-moderate hearing loss in children leads to changes in how brain processes sound
Deafness in early childhood is known to lead to lasting changes in how sounds are processed in the brain, but new research published today in eLife shows that even mild-to-moderate levels of hearing loss in young children can lead to similar changes.
The Lancet HIV: Tenfold increase in number of adolescents on HIV treatment in South Africa since 2010, but many still untreated
A new study of more than 700,000 one to 19-year olds being treated for HIV infection suggests a ten-fold increase in the number of adolescents aged 15 to 19 receiving HIV treatment in South Africa, according to results published in The Lancet HIV journal.
Epilepsy: Function of 'brake cells' disrupted
In some forms of epilepsy, the function of certain ''brake cells'' in the brain is presumed to be disrupted.
New method improves measurement of animal behaviour using deep learning
Konstanz researchers develop deep learning toolkit for high-speed measurement of body posture in animals.
Glowing bacteria in anglerfish 'lamp' come from the water
New research shows that female deep-sea anglerfish's bioluminescent bacteria -- which illuminate their 'headlamp' -- most likely come from the water.
Cracking how 'water bears' survive the extremes
Scientists at UC San Diego have gained a new understanding of how tiny, ultra-resilient invertebrates known as tardigrades, or 'water bears,' are protected in extreme conditions.
Scientists quantify global volcanic CO2 venting; estimate total carbon on Earth
Reporting on 10 years of Deep Carbon Observatory research, scientists say.
NASA satellite shows Typhoon Mitag's large reach over East China Sea
The bulk of Typhoon Mitag's clouds and precipitation has been pushed north of its center, extending its reach over the East China Sea.
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome face higher risk of breathing difficulties
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely to develop poor respiratory health based on lung function tests, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.
Protozoans and pathogens make for an infectious mix
The new observation that strains of V. cholerae can be expelled into the environment after being ingested by protozoa, and that these bacteria are then primed for colonisation and infection in humans, could help explain why cholera is so persistent in aquatic environments.
Molecular motors -- Rotation on an eight-shaped path
Chemical engineers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich, Germany, have developed the first molecular motor that enables an eight-shaped movement.
Chemicals for pharmaceuticals could be made cheaper and greener by new catalysts
High value chemicals used to make pharmaceuticals could be made much cheaper and quicker thanks to a series of new catalysts made by scientists at the University of Warwick in collaboration with GoldenKeys High-Tech Co., Ltd. in China.
2000 atoms in two places at once
The quantum superposition principle has been tested on a scale as never before in a new study by scientists at the University of Vienna.
Researchers synthesize 'impossible' superconductor
Researchers from the US, Russia, and China have bent the rules of classical chemistry and synthesized a 'forbidden' compound of cerium and hydrogen -- CeH9 -- which exhibits superconductivity at a relatively low pressure of 1 million atmospheres.
ATS/IDSA publishes clinical guideline on community acquired pneumonia
The American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America have published an official clinical guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of adults with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the ATS's Oct.
Treatment with long term, low dose antibiotic could help people born with chronic lung condition
Taking a low dose of the antibiotic azithromycin for 6 months reduces symptoms for patients with the chronic lung condition primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.
'Poisoned arrowhead' used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
A weapon bacteria use to vanquish their competitors could be copied to create new forms of antibiotics, according to Imperial College London research.
Antidepressants linked to heightened pregnancy related diabetes risk
Taking antidepressants while expecting a baby is linked to a heightened risk of developing diabetes that is specifically related to pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Open.
NASA finds Narda's remnants bringing rain to mexico, headed to southwestern US
The remnant low pressure area that was formerly known as tropical cyclone Narda is still generating rainfall as it moves toward the southwestern US.
Structural color printing of 3D microscale objects by shrinking photonic crystals
SUTD Researchers have developed a 'coloring-by-shrinking' method to print arbitrary 3D microscopic objects exhibiting structural colors.
Jellyfish's 'superpowers' gained through cellular mechanism
Jellyfish are animals that possess the unique ability to regenerate body parts.
Predators and hidey-holes are good for reef fish populations
New research highlights two factors that play a critical role in supporting reef fish populations and - ultimately - creating conditions that are more favorable for the growth of both coral reefs and seagrass.
Lop-eared rabbits more likely to have tooth/ear problems than erect eared cousins
Lop (floppy) eared rabbits are more likely than erect ('up') eared breeds to have potentially painful ear and dental problems that may ultimately affect their ability to hear and eat properly, finds a small observational study published in Vet Record.
Cerebral reperfusion of reading network predicts recovery of reading ability after stroke
'Our findings support the utility of cerebral perfusion as a biomarker for recovery after stroke,' said Dr.
Rural, urban drive times to nearest opioid treatment programs differ
Comparing drive times to the nearest opioid treatment programs in urban and rural counties in five US states with the highest county rates of opioid-related overdose deaths was the focus of this research letter.
New in Ethics & Human Research, September-October 2019
Ethical questions about efforts to 'do research differently' in response to past injustices, and more in the September - October issue.
Domestic violence reduces likelihood of mothers breastfeeding in developing countries
Mothers who have suffered from domestic violence are substantially less likely to follow recommended breastfeeding practices in low to middle-income countries, a new study shows.
Food insecurity in young adults raises risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma
A paradox of food insecurity in wealthy countries is its association with excess weight.
Discovery enables clear identification of diseased beta cells in type 2 diabetes
Studies of diabetes rely on the ability of researchers to sort diseased cells from healthy cells.
Exploring the brain in a new way: WVU researcher records neurons to understand cognition
Whether we're searching for Waldo or our keys in a room of clutter, we tap into a part of the frontal region of the brain when performing visual, goal-related tasks.
Emerging parasitic disease mimics the symptoms of visceral leishmaniasis in people
A new study suggests that transmission of a protozoan parasite from insects may also cause leishmaniasis-like symptoms in people.
Cheap, quick test identifies pneumonia patients at risk of respiratory failure or sepsis
Spanish researchers in Valencia have identified specific fragments of genetic material that play a role in the development of respiratory failure and sepsis in pneumonia patients, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.
Step forward in falling research
University of Queensland research shows there is more at play than just a sinking feeling when you stumble during movement or trip in a hole in the ground.
Shape affects performance of micropillars in heat transfer
A Washington University in St. Louis researcher has shown for the first time that the shape of a nanostructure has an effect on its ability to retain water.
Safeguarding the world's largest tuna fishery
New research has used a combination of records from captains and scientific observers, FAD tracking data, ocean models and cutting edge simulation methods to reveal for the first time the trajectories and potential impact FADs may have on fisheries around Pacific island nations.
NASA satellite sees a large Hurricane Lorenzo headed toward Azores
Hurricane Lorenzo was heading toward the Azores Islands when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the storm.
Intimate partner violence is linked to suboptimal breastfeeding practices in poorer countries
Mothers exposed to intimate partner violence in low- and middle-income countries are less likely to initiate breastfeeding early and breastfeed exclusively in the first six months, according to a study published October 1 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Dr Rishi Caleyachetty of the University of Warwick in the UK, and colleagues.
Virtual medical visits get wary welcome from older adults, poll finds
Most people over 50 aren't ready to embrace virtual health visits with their medical providers, a new poll on telehealth finds.
Did long ago tsunamis lead to mysterious, tropical fungal outbreak in Pacific northwest?
The Great Alaskan Earthquake of 1964 and the tsunamis it spawned may have washed a tropical fungus ashore, leading to a subsequent outbreak of often-fatal infections among people in coastal regions of the Pacific Northwest, according to a paper co-authored by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the nonprofit Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope.
S1P molecule regulates dendritic cell localization and vascular integrity in lymph nodes
Researchers found that HEVs, which were deficient for the S1P-transporter Spinster-homologue-2, were unable to attract dendritic cells in order to trigger LTβr-signaling through cell-cell contact with HEVs.
250-million-year-old evolutionary remnants seen in muscles of human embryos
A team of evolutionary biologists have demonstrated that some limb muscles known to be present in many mammals but absent in the adult human are actually formed during early human development and then lost prior to birth.
For the first time, UMD professor observes crystallized iron product, hemozoin, made in mammals
For the first time ever, a UMD professor has observed a crystallized iron product called hemozoin being made in mammals, with widespread implications for future research and treatment of blood disorders.
New research identifies the strengths and weaknesses of super material
Scientists have measured how the super-plastic material ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, commercially known as Dyneema or Spectra, interacts when bolted to other materials.
Scientists improve voiceprint collection
Researchers from HSE University and Nizhny Novgorod State Linguistic University (LUNN) have developed a new method for ensuring quality in automatic voice recording.
Uncovering new therapeutic targets for airway inflammation in sickle cell disease
A new study by De, Agrawal, Morrone et al, challenges the common notion that airway in-flammation in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is secondary to asthma, even though the two disor-ders often coexist.
Estimating calorie content not clear-cut for all -- Otago study
We make food decisions several times a day - from what time we eat to how much - but a new University of Otago, New Zealand, study has found we are not very good at judging the energy-density of what we consume.
New research puts Australia at forefront of blue carbon economy
For the first time, scientist have accurately measured the amount of carbon dioxide being absorbed by marine ecosystems in Australia.
Collagen fibers encourage cell streaming through balancing act
Engineers from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University have shown that the length of collagen fibers has a roll to play in the ability of normal cells to become invasive.
Doctor offers unique perspective as father of a child with rare genetic disease
From a professional standpoint, Nathan Hoot, MD, Ph.D., understands the value of medical research that leads to new, groundbreaking drugs in the treatment of rare diseases.
Inspired by Northern clingfish, researchers make a better suction cup
A University of Washington team inspired by the clingfish's suction power set out to develop an artificial suction cup that borrows from nature's design.
Did IV high-dose vitamin C improve outcomes for patients with sepsis and severe lung condition?
This randomized clinical trial looked at whether high-dose vitamin C delivered intravenously could reduce organ failure, inflammation and vascular injury in patients with sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe lung condition that is a common organ injury associated with sepsis.
The private lives of sharks
White sharks are top predators in the marine environment, but unlike their terrestrial counterparts, very little is known about their predatory activity underwater, with current knowledge limited to surface predation events.
Why are there no animals with three legs?
If 'Why?' is the first question in science, 'Why not?' must be a close second.
The science of mindfulness -- What do we really know and where do we go?
The historical practice of mindfulness is a burgeoning integrated medicine field associated with benefits for people with issues ranging from insomnia to chronic pain and fueled by more than $550 million in federal funding over the past 20 years.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.