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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | October 10, 2019


Mutation of the co-chaperone Tsc1 in bladder cancer diminishes Hsp90 acetylation and reduces drug sensitivity and selectivity
The researchers have recently identified the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 as a new co-chaperone of Hsp90 that affects Hsp90 binding to its inhibitors.
Viagra helps mobilize bone marrow stem cells for transplantation in mice
The combination of two clinically approved drugs -- Viagra and Plerixafor -- rapidly and efficiently mobilizes blood stem cells from the bone marrow into the bloodstream in mice, researchers report Oct.
Combination of techniques could improve security for IoT devices
A multi-pronged data analysis approach that can strengthen the security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices -- such as smart TVs, home video cameras and baby monitors -- against current risks and threats has been created by a team of Penn State World Campus students.
E-cigarettes, tobacco and cannabis products are littering high schools
High schools in the San Francisco Bay Area are being contaminated by plastics and toxic litter from e-cigarettes, cannabis products and combustible tobacco products such as cigarettes and cigarillos, a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco has found.
Stable radicals can solve unconventional problems in modern science and technology
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University study reaction properties of verdazyl radicals, which can expand scientific knowledge into the field of organic chemistry and help to obtain new materials.
Beyond the 'replication crisis,' does research face an 'inference crisis'?
For the past decade, social scientists have been unpacking a 'replication crisis' that has revealed how findings of an alarming number of scientific studies are difficult or impossible to repeat.
Reducing, reusing Europe's 2.5 million tonnes of plastic in e-waste each year
Plastics account for about 20% of materials in electronic and electrical equipment (EEE); most isn't designed for recovery and reuse.
Brain scans may provide clues to suicide risk
Researchers have identified brain circuitry differences that might be associated with suicidal behavior in individuals with mood disorders.
Archaeology -- Social inequality in Bronze Age households
Archaeogenetic analyses provide new insights into social inequality 4,000 years ago: nuclear families lived together with foreign women and individuals from lower social classes in the same household.
Children associate white, but not black, men with 'brilliant' stereotype, new study finds
The stereotype that associates being 'brilliant' with white men more than White women is shared by children regardless of their own race, finds a team of psychology researchers.
Musical perception: nature or nurture?
This is the subject of the research by Juan Manuel Toro (ICREA) and Carlota Pagès Portabella, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition, published in the journal Psychophysiology as part of a H2020 project being carried out with Fundació Bial to understand the neuronal bases of musical cognition.
New customized drug treatment bypasses a single child's unique mutation within a year of diagnosis
An unprecedented case at Boston Children's Hospital shows that it's possible to do something that's never been done before: identify a patient's unique mutation, design a customized drug to bypass it, manufacture and test the drug, and obtain permission from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to begin treating the patient -- all in less than one year.
Tracking wild pigs in real time and understanding their interaction with agro-ecosystems
A new study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications investigates how the success of a wild pig invasion may be dependent on how they use their surrounding food resources, and how when it comes to agriculture, the pigs continue their destructive trend.
Sweating for science
When people become stressed, their bodies can respond by sweating.
TTUHSC study shows brain mechanisms have potential to block arthritis pain
Because pain is a complex condition, treating it efficiently continues to pose challenge for physicians.
Update 'Nearest Relative' criteria under Mental Health Act to increase patient choice
Better provision must be made to allow people with mental health problems detained under the Mental Health Act to select a nominated person to act on their behalf, rather than automatically choosing a nearest relative.
Light my fire: How to startup fusion devices every time
Researchers have constructed a framework for starting and raising a fusion plasma to temperatures rivaling the sun in hundreds of milliseconds.
Science snapshots -- Waste to fuel, moire superlattices, mining cellphones for energy data
As reported in Nature Physics, a Berkeley Lab-led team of physicists and materials scientists was the first to unambiguously observe and document the unique optical phenomena that occur in certain types of synthetic materials called moire; superlattices.
Milky Way raids intergalactic 'bank accounts,' Hubble study finds
Gas blown out of the Milky Way disk from exploding stars falls back onto the galaxy to form new generations of stars.
CABI scientists track wheat aphids and their natural enemies for better pest management in Pakistan
For the first time, CABI scientists have studied the distribution and population dynamics of wheat aphids and their natural enemies in Pakistan through seasons and periods of time.
Noah-MP captures major hydrological patterns in China
The Noah land surface model with multi-parameterization options (Noah-MP) simulates the major spatiotemporal patterns of hydrological variables in China, a vast country characterized by complex terrain and large river basins across a wide range of climates.
Sharing data for improved forest protection and monitoring
Although the mapping of aboveground biomass is now possible with satellite remote sensing, these maps still have to be calibrated and validated using on-site data gathered by researchers across the world.
New test offers improved diagnosis and management of chronic hepatitis B
A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes a new and powerful laboratory tool that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.
Right whale mothers 'whisper' to their calves to avoid attracting predators
As new moms, North Atlantic right whales tone down their underwater vocalizations and 'whisper' to their young calves to avoid attracting predators, a new study by scientists at Syracuse University, Duke University and NOAA Fisheries' Northeast Fisheries Center finds.
Protective mediators can help heal injured tendon cells by attacking inflammation
Tendon tears, both to the rotator cuff and Achilles heel, are common injuries, especially in aged individuals.
Ebola antibodies at work
Scientists in Israel and Germany show, on the molecular level, how an experimental vaccine offers long-term protection against the disease.
The Milky Way kidnapped several tiny galaxies from its neighbor
A team of astronomers led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has discovered that several of the small -- or 'dwarf' -- galaxies orbiting the Milky Way were likely stolen from the Large Magellanic Cloud, including several ultrafaint dwarfs, but also relatively bright and well-known satellite galaxies, such as Carina and Fornax.
Biologically-inspired skin improves robots' sensory abilities
Sensitive synthetic skin enables robots to sense their own bodies and surroundings - a crucial capability if they are to be in close contact with people.
Study offers solution to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle
New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades.
New CEOs can raise their social game to keep their jobs, says Rice University study
A new study shows that two key factors can make freshly appointed CEOs more vulnerable and raise the odds they'll get fired.
Endometriosis may be costing us much more than previously thought
Along with significant physical pain, endometriosis also hurts Australian women at the hip pocket, as well as having significant economic effects on society as a whole, a new study published today in PLOS ONE confirms.
Scientists 'must be allowed to cry' about destruction of nature
Scientists witnessing the destruction of the natural world must be supported and 'allowed to cry,' researchers say.
Illegal urban off-road vehicles as risky as motorcycles in cities
People who illegally ride off-road vehicles, such as dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles, on city streets suffer similar crash injuries as motorcyclists, but are less likely to die even though many riders don't wear helmets, according to a Rutgers researcher.
Water + air + electricity = hydrogen peroxide
A reactor developed by Rice University engineers produces pure hydrogen peroxide solutions from water, air and energy.
Johns Hopkins researchers discover material that could someday power quantum computer
Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers.
SLAS Technology releases part 1 of special 2-part issue
In the October Special Issue of SLAS Technology, Guest Editors Soojung Claire Hur, Ph.D., and Deok-Ho Kim, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA) introduce a collection of articles and reviews focused on the advancement in technologies that are playing a major role in shifting healthcare closer to more predictive, preventative and personalized medicine.
NHS needs to act on patient feedback, say Sheffield health researchers
Researchers from the University of Sheffield School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) are today making a series of recommendations for NHS mental health trusts to change the way they collect and use patient feedback to improve the quality of care for inpatients.
Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal
Researchers at EPFL have created a metallic microdevice in which they can define and tune patterns of superconductivity.
Carnivorous plant study captures universal rules of leaf making
Leaves display a remarkable range of forms from flat sheets with simple outlines to the cup-shaped traps found in carnivorous plants.
Scientists ask: How can liquid organelles in cells coexist without merging?
New research may help to explain an intriguing phenomenon inside human cells: how wall-less liquid organelles are able to coexist as separate entities instead of just merging together.
Taking RTKI drugs during radiotherapy may not aid survival, worsens side effects
Taking certain cancer-fighting drugs while undergoing radiation therapy may not increase survival for patients, but may, instead, increase side effects, according to a team of researchers.
Firearm-related eye injuries to patients under 21
Researchers used data from a national registry of hospitalized trauma cases in the United States to examine patterns of firearm-related eye injuries among patients under age 21 from 2008 through 2014.
Viagra shows promise for use in bone marrow transplants
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have demonstrated a new, rapid method to obtain donor stem cells for bone marrow transplants using a combination of Viagra and a second drug called Plerixafor.
mpacts of low-dose exposure to antibiotics unveiled in zebrafish gut
An antibiotic commonly found at low concentrations in the environment can have major impacts on gut bacteria, report researchers at the University of Oregon.
Study finds public support for health care providers talking about gun safety
Most Californians, including most gun owners, agree that gun safety conversations between health care providers and patients are appropriate when there is a gun in the home and risk of injury is elevated.
Barriers to access to hearing aids for children
Researchers looked at demographic, socioeconomic and clinical factors that were associated with timely access to hearing aids for children.
System can minimize damage when self-driving vehicles crash
Engineers have developed decision-making and motion-planning technology to limit injuries and damage when self-driving vehicles are involved in unavoidable crashes.
GPs stopped giving alcohol advice to patients when they stopped being paid to do so
When the Department of Health (England) introduced financial incentives to encourage general practitioners (GPs) to talk to patients about their drinking in April 2008, there was a small, gradual increase in screening and the provision of alcohol advice.
Study identifies 5 patterns of gun ownership by motivation, practices, other features
Can firearm owners be grouped into distinct groups based on the number and types of firearms owned, primary reason for having firearms and other patterns of ownership?
New research sheds light on the ages of lunar ice deposits
The discovery of ice deposits in craters scattered across the Moon's south pole has helped to renew interest in exploring the lunar surface.
Suicide in low- and middle-income countries
Future treatment and prevention of suicidal behavior in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) should involve a wider range of approaches beyond just the treatment of psychiatric illness, according to a new University of Bristol study published on World Mental Health Day today in PLOS Medicine.
Changes in driver shifts and pick-up choices for food delivery services can boost profits
The food delivery business, popularized by mobile online services such as Grubhub, OrderUp, and DoorDash, has become a $200 billion industry, which is expected to grow by more than 15% annually over the next five years.
One in five cardiac rehab patients are depressed, anxious, or stressed
Patients with depression, anxiety or stress are more likely to drop out of cardiac rehabilitation, reports a study published on World Mental Health Day in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
International group of researchers assert importance of diversity in genomics research
Broadening diversity among participants in human genomics research will maximize its potential to discover causes and possible treatments of diseases, requiring thoughtful study design and methodological considerations, write members of an international genomics consortium in the journal Cell.
Explained: The lifetime of an evaporating liquid drop
The lifespan of a liquid droplet which is transforming into vapour can now be predicted thanks to a theory developed at the University of Warwick.
That new yarn? -- wearable, washable textile devices are possible with MXene-coated yarns
Drexel University researchers have figured out how to add more conductivity into functional fabric devices, by coating yarns with a 2-dimensional carbon-based material called MXene, to make conductive threads.
Modelling ion beam therapy
A group of physicists have used Monte Carlo modelling to produce a consistent theoretical interpretation of accurate experimental measurements of ion beams in liquid water, which is the most relevant substance for simulating interactions with human tissue.
CRISPR enzyme programmed to kill viruses in human cells
A team led by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has now turned a CRISPR RNA-cutting enzyme into an antiviral that can be programmed to detect and destroy RNA-based viruses in human cells.
Engineers solve 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing
Engineers Alexander Stoytchev and Vladimir Sukhoy have solved a 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing.
Linguists track impact of cognitive decline across three decades of one writer's diaries
Linguistics researchers have identified a relationship between language change and the transition from healthy to a diagnosis of severe dementia.
Keeping cool by twisting and coiling 'twistocaloric' yarns
Scientists have figured out how to induce a cooling effect in materials by a change in yarn or fiber twist, which they call 'twistocaloric' cooling.
Researchers discover how chlamydia takes up new DNA from host
A recent paper by a team of molecular biologists headquartered at the University of Kansas pinpointed a gene that allows chlamydia to take up DNA from its host environment.
The secret to sneaky float serves
A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba performed wind tunnel experiments to determine the role of asymmetry caused by the orientation of a volleyball on its aerodynamic characteristics.
Serum neurofilament is a discriminative biomarker between frontotemporal dementia and psychiatric disorders
Early symptoms of frontotemporal dementia are often confused with symptoms occurring in psychiatric disorders.
Targeting immune cells may be potential therapy for Alzheimer's
A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Koala epidemic provides lesson in how DNA protects itself from viruses
In animals, infections are fought by the immune system. Studies on an unusual virus infecting wild koalas, by a team of researchers from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Queensland, reveal a new form of 'genome immunity.' The study appears Oct.
Research sheds new light on how the brain forms and recalls memories
Neuroscientists at the University of Birmingham have proved how different parts of the human brain work together to create and retrieve episodic memory.
AI-based cytometer detects rare cells in blood using magnetic modulation and deep learning
Researchers at UCLA Samueli School of Engineering, led by Prof.
Maternal obesity speeds up aging in offspring
The effects of maternal obesity even pass across generations to offspring, accelerating the rate of aging of metabolic problems that occur in normal life.
New electrolyte stops rapid performance decline of next-generation lithium battery
Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have designed and tested a new electrolyte composition that could greatly accelerate the adoption of the next generation of lithium-ion batteries.
Watching energy transport through biomimetic nanotubes
Scientists from the University of Groningen (the Netherlands) and the University of Würzburg (Germany) have investigated a simple biomimetic light-harvesting system using advanced spectroscopy combined with a microfluidic platform.
Has global warming stopped? The tap of incoming energy cannot be turned off
A rapid increase in the global ocean heat content has been detected in observations during the warming slowdown period, at a rate of about 9.8 × 1021 J yr-1.
Researchers develop intelligent, shape-morphing, self-healing material for soft robotics
Advances in the fields of soft robotics, wearable technologies, and human/machine interfaces require a new class of stretchable materials that can change shape adaptively while relying only on portable electronics for power.
Researchers decode the immune response to Ebola vaccine
The vaccine rVSV-EBOV is currently used in the fight against Ebola virus.
Skin cancer above the neck more likely to spread, research shows
Forty-five patients with new diagnoses of MM were investigated over a period of 6 months and were divided into two groups of patients, with above neck MM and below neck MM.
'Sticky' gene may help Valium calm nerves
For years, scientists thought that these powerful sedatives, which are used to treat anxiety, muscle spasms, and sleeping disorders, worked alone to calm nerves.
Aerial photographs shed light on Mont Blanc ice loss
Photographs taken in the exact same spot 100 years apart show the impact of climate change on the Mont Blanc massif.
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite needed 3 orbits to see all of Super Typhoon Hagibis
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a composite visible image of the very large Super Typhoon Hagibis in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Oct.
Babies burdened by environmental estrogens in mothers' wombs
Early childhood life in the womb is particularly sensitive to the effects of environmental pollutants.
Enhancing memory network via brain stimulation
Magnetic stimulation of the posterior parietal cortex increases functional connectivity of a neural network implicated in memory, shows human research published in eNeuro.
People pay more attention to stimuli they associate with danger
A new analysis of how people prioritize their attention when determining safety and danger in busy settings, such as crossing a road, suggests that a person will pay more attention to something if they learn it is associated with danger.
Why rats prefer company of the young and stressed
Researchers have identified a neural pathway implicated in social interaction between adult and juvenile animals, according to new research in rats published in JNeurosci.
Political parties with less interest in an issue more likely to take radical stance
Political parties who care less about an issue will take more extreme stances on it when drawing up policies to appeal to the electorate -- and it can pay off at the ballot box.
Nanostructures help to reduce the adhesion of bacteria
Scientists has shown how bacteria adhere to rough surfaces at the microscopic level.
Neurofeedback increases self-esteem by rebalancing brain circuits in depression
A study published in the journal Neuroimage: Clinical found that patients with Major Depressive Disorder, who had recovered from symptoms, were able to strengthen some of their brain connections, thereby increasing their self-esteem.
Food comas and long-term memories -- New research points to an appetizing connection
There may be a connection between food comas -- resting after eating -- and the formation of long-term memories, a team of neuroscientists concludes based on its study on brain activity in sea slugs.
Ancient DNA reveals social inequality in bronze age Europe households
Providing a clearer picture of intra-household inequality in ancient times, new research reports that prehistoric German households near the Lech Valley consisted of a high-status core family and unrelated low-status individuals.
Synaptic function closely tied to overall need for sleep, regardless of day or night
The natural need for sleep and the brain's synaptic function are closely linked, according to a pair of studies in mice, which suggest that sleep deprivation may also deprive the brain of key proteins required for synaptic activities including plasticity.
FSU physics researchers break new ground, explore unknown energy regions
Florida State University physicists are using photon-proton collisions to capture particles in an unexplored energy region, yielding new insights into the matter that binds parts of the nucleus together.
Global model reveals a future without nature's crucial contributions to humanity
A new model that captures nature's contributions to human wellbeing and compares them to peoples' future needs shows that, within the next thirty years, as many five billion people could face water and food insecurity -- particularly in Africa and South Asia.
Rotavirus infection may turn on type 1 diabetes
Rotavirus infection may play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, according to a front matter article published Oct.
Genetics of nephropathia epidemica researched by Kazan Federal University
This particular inquiry pertains to CCR5 -- a gene which has lately been on the focuses of research worldwide.
Study identifies religious bias against refugees
When you hold constant national origin, religion is the most powerful source of discrimination against refugees to the United States -- mattering more than gender, age, fluency in English or professional skill.
Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change
Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU).
Biomedical sciences researchers isolate gut bacteria that can prevent and cure rotavirus infection
The presence of specific microbiota, or microorganisms that live in the digestive tract, can prevent and cure rotavirus infection, which is the leading cause of severe, life-threatening diarrhea in children worldwide, according to a new study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
Gut immunity more developed before birth than previously thought
The first comprehensive look at the immune system of the fetal gut shows that it is far more developed before birth, and could help develop new maternal vaccines and reveal if we are predisposed to autoimmune diseases before birth.
New study reveals an innate genome immune response to retroviruses in koalas
A new study from researchers at UMass Medical School and the University of Queensland in Australia identifies a never-before-seen type of immune response in an animal already known for being unique: the koala bear.
Research shows that doing the twist is hot, unwinding is cool
An international team led by researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and Nankai University in China has discovered a new technology for refrigeration that is based on twisting and untwisting fibers.
Media alert: New articles on the ethics of genome editing published in The CRISPR Journal
The CRISPR Journal announces the publication of its October 2019 Special Issue on The Ethics of Human Genome Editing.
Compound in breast milk fights harmful bacteria
A compound in human breast milk fights infections by harmful bacteria while allowing beneficial bacteria to thrive, according to researchers at National Jewish Health and the University of Iowa.
Removing invasive mice from the Farallon Islands would benefit threatened birds
New research from Point Blue Conservation Science shows the significant negative impact that invasive, non-native house mice on the Farallon Islands are having to the threatened ashy storm-petrel.
HKU-led study on language speed and efficiency
Are some languages more efficient than others? In a recent study led by the University of Hong Kong (HKU) titled 'Different languages, similar encoding efficiency: comparable information rates across the human communicative niche', an international and interdisciplinary team comprising scientists at the Laboratoire Dynamique Du Langage (France), Ajou University (South Korea) and HKU analyzed 17 languages and found that all languages convey information at similar rates, regardless of whether they are spoken faster or slower.
A Lego-like approach to improve nature's own ability to kill dangerous bacteria
In a paper recently published in Biomacromolecules, a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute research team demonstrated how it could improve upon the ability of nature's exquisitely selective collection of antimicrobial enzymes to attack bacteria in a way that's much less likely to cause bacterial resistance.
Plant death may reveal genetic mechanisms underlying cell self-destruction
Hybrid plants, which produced by crossing two different types of parents, often die in conditions in which both parents would survive.
'Tricked' bacteria open new pathways to antimicrobial treatments
Scientists have developed a new technique to trick bacteria into revealing hundreds of holes in their cell walls, opening the door for drugs that destroy bacteria's cells.
Researchers identify new therapeutic target for pulmonary fibrosis
Researchers in Japan have identified a genetic mutation that causes a severe lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) by killing the cells lining the lung's airways.
What doesn't crack them makes them stronger
It sounds a bit strange, but some materials become stronger when subjected to stress.
Buttons and flies help Hopkins solve longtime DNA mystery
Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development.
Electrochemistry to benefit photonics: Nanotubes can control laser pulses
An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Laboratory of Nanomaterials at the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) has shown that the nonlinear optical response of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by electrochemical gating.
Placenta transit of an environmental estrogen
The human foetus is considered to be particularly sensitive to environmental contaminants.
New tool visualizes nature's benefits worldwide
The researchers set out to understand where nature contributes the most to people and how many people may be affected by future changes.
How skin cells from foot soles could help relieve amputees of stump injury
Imperial scientists hope to re-engineer stump skin for more comfortable prosthetics -- using skin from the sole of the foot as a template.
Sunlight degrades polystyrene faster than expected
A study published by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that polystyrene, one of the world's most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years as previously thought.
New science on cracking leads to self-healing materials
Cracks in the desert floor appear random to the untrained eye, even beautifully so, but the mathematics governing patterns of dried clay turn out to be predictable -- and useful in designing advanced materials.
New test diagnoses Lyme disease within 15 minutes
Current testing for Lyme disease, called the standard 2-tiered approach or the STT, involves running two complex assays (ELISA and western blot) to detect antibodies against the bacterium, and requires experienced personnel in a lab, and a few hours to carry out and interpret.
Sunlight degrades polystyrene much faster than expected
Polystyrene persists in the environment for millennia, according to some international governmental agencies.
Scientists at the MDI biological laboratory are decoding the genetic mechanisms of aging
A new paper by MDI Biological Laboratory scientists Jarod Rollins, Ph.D., and Aric Rogers, Ph.D., co-corresponding authors, describes the mechanisms by which longevity is regulated post-transcriptionally, or after a genetic blueprint has been transcribed from an organism's DNA.
Light-based strategy effectively treats carbon monoxide poisoning in rats
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital recently developed a phototherapy strategy that was highly effective for removing carbon monoxide in rats.
Study suggests ice on lunar south pole may have more than 1 source
New research sheds light on the ages of ice deposits reported in the area of the Moon's south pole -- information that could help identify the sources of the deposits and help in planning future human exploration.
Secrets to climate change adaptation uncovered in the European corn borer moth
Biologists have found two genes that may permit some insect species to survive climate change by adjusting their biological annual clocks while others succumb.
Powerful new genomics method can be used to reveal the causes of rare genetic diseases
The technique, which appears in the latest issue of Science, makes use of the fact that people inherit two copies or ''alleles'' of virtually every gene, one from the mother and one from the father.

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