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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | October 15, 2019


Searching for water
What does the presence of 1,000 year old water mean for the future of water supplies under the desert regions of Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Jordan, Oman, Yemen and the United Arab Emirates?
The 7 types of sugar daddy relationships
University of Colorado Denver researcher looks inside 48 sugar daddy relationships to better understand the different types of dynamics, break down the typical stereotype(s) and better understand how these relationships work in the United States.
New evidence that hip and knee steroid injections more dangerous than thought
A new study reveals that commonly given hip and knee steroid intra-articular injections may be harmful in some patients with at-risk conditions or may cause complications that are not well understood.
Oscillation assisted 3D printing renders ultrafast fabrication of microlens array
An oscillation assisted digital light processing (DLP) based 3D printing approach is developed to enable ultrafast fabrication of microlens arrays with optically smooth surface (1 nm surface roughness) via a single 1-3 seconds exposure of grayscale UV light.
Heavier birth weight linked to childhood allergies
New research shows that the more a baby weighs at birth relative to its gestational age the higher the risk they will suffer from childhood food allergy or eczema, although not hay fever.
E-cigarettes: 5 things to know
A practice article about e-cigarettes provides a quick reference on the use of these electronic nicotine delivery systems published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Acceptance and commitment therapy may ease fear of recurrence in cancer survivors
In a first of its kind study, researchers from Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University, Butler University and West Virginia University report that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) shows significant promise for treating fear of cancer recurrence in women who have survived breast cancer.
Protein that triggers plant defences to light stress identified
A newly discovered protein turns on plants' cellular defence to excessive light and other stress factors caused by a changing climate, according to a new study published in eLife.
Election 2019: Hope for a national pharmacare plan
The 2019 federal election in Canada brings hope for universal pharmacare if Canadians ensure the elected government delivers on the long-delayed promise of universal access to essential medications, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
New study debunks myth that only children are more narcissistic than kids with siblings
The stereotype that only children are selfish, or more self-centered than those with siblings is sometimes used as an argument for having more than one child, but researchers from Germany find there's no evidence for the claim that only children are more narcissistic than children with sibling.
Repeated febrile convulsions linked to epilepsy and psychiatric disorders
The risk of febrile convulsions increases with the child's fever, and children who suffer from repeated febrile convulsions during their first year of life have an increased risk of developing epilepsy and psychiatric disorders later in life.
Lost in combat?
Recent archaeological investigations in the Tollense Valley by a research team including the University of Göttingen have unearthed a collection of 31 unusual objects.
New research to boost global date fruit production
Today on World Food Day, a team of Plant Scientists from King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) has begun a major project to improve global date palm production and protection.
Experiment measures velocity in 3D
Many of today's scientific processes are simulated using computer-driven mathematical models.
Introduce standard units for cannabis to improve mental health
A unit system for cannabis, similar to the one used for alcohol, could help people monitor consumption and reduce the risk of adverse health effects.
Study on climate protection: More forest -- less meat
Forest protects the climate. Reforestation can decisively contribute to mitigating global warming according to the Paris Agreement.
Deaf infants more attuned to parent's visual cues
A University of Washington-led study finds that Deaf infants exposed to American Sign Language are especially tuned to a parent's eye gaze, itself a social connection between parent and child that is linked to early learning.
Being attractive helps, but it isn't everything
Political scientist Sebastian Jäckle studies the influence of candidates' appearance on their electoral chances.
New study may have the reason why heart medication gives muscle pain
The McMaster research team found muscle cells treated with statins released the amino acid called glutamate at much higher levels than muscle cells that were untreated.
Polyamorous families face stigma during pregnancy and birth
Polyamorous families experience marginalization during pregnancy and birth, but with open, nonjudgmental attitudes from health care providers and changes to hospital policies, this can be reduced, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Physical activity in lessons improves students' attainment
Students who take part in physical exercises like star jumps or running on the spot during school lessons do better in tests than peers who stick to sedentary learning, according to a UCL-led study.
Resurrection of 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria jumped from gorillas to humans
For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world's deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans.
Fire blankets can protect buildings from wildfires
Wrapping a building in a fire-protective blanket is a viable way of protecting it against wildfires, finds the first study to scientifically assess this method of defense.
Synthetic cells make long-distance calls
Rice University synthetic biologists design transcriptional circuits that allow single-cell microbes to form networks that spur collective action, even in large communities.
DNA fracturing rewires gene control in cancer
A multi-institutional team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has brought attention to genomic structural variation as a previously unappreciated mechanism involved in altering DNA methylation, a form of gene control, in human cancers.
Taking vitamin D by oral spray just as effective as taking a tablet
Taking vitamin D by oral spray is just as effective as taking a tablet, research from the University of Sheffield has found.
Read to kids in Spanish; it'll help their English
Immigrant parents worry their children will struggle with reading and fret that as non-English speakers, they can't help.
Study 'cures' oldest case of deafness in human evolution
An international team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has published a new study examining a 430,000-year-old cranium of a human ancestor that was previously described as deaf, representing the oldest case of deafness in human prehistory.
Taming the wild cheese fungus
The flavors of fermented foods are heavily shaped by the fungi that grow on them, but the evolutionary origins of those fungi aren't well understood.
New understanding of the evolution of cosmic electromagnetic fields
Electromagnetism was discovered 200 years ago, but the origin of the very large electromagnetic fields in the universe is still a mystery.
BU finds PTSD nearly doubles infection risk
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study is the first to examine the relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dozens of infection types in a nationwide cohort.
Sleep apnea treatment associated with lower health care costs
Treating patients with moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea with positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is associated with reduced acute care visits and health care expenditures, according to a recent study.
Two new porcelain crab species discovered
Two new symbiotic porcelain crab species have been described. One of them, from the South China Sea of Vietnam, inhabits the compact tube-like shelters built by the polychaete worm with other organisms.
Study: Nonsurgical treatment options effective for sinus issues
In a recent clinical study led by a University of Cincinnati researcher, a regimen of combined oral and topical corticosteroids were effectively used to treat patients who suffer from severe CRS with nasal polyps and for whom surgery is often the first option.
Glowing particles in the blood may help diagnose and monitor brain cancer
A chemical that has improved surgeries for brain cancer by making tumor cells fluorescent may also help doctors safely diagnose the disease and monitor its response to treatment.
Study suggests a protein could play key role in neurodegenerative diseases
Research led by Queen Mary University of London and the University of Seville around one protein's role in regulating brain inflammation could improve our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.
The giant geode of Pulpí
The geode of Pulpí is an 11-meter hollow ovoid with crystal-paneled walls.
Many cooks don't spoil the broth: Manifold symbionts prepare the host for any eventuality
Deep-sea mussels, which rely on symbiotic bacteria for food, harbor a surprisingly high diversity of these bacterial 'cooks': Up to 16 different bacterial strains live in the mussel's gills, each with its own abilities and strengths.
Integration of refugees: Germans in east and west show similar willingness to help
In discussions in Germany on immigrants, it is often the eastern part of Germany, in particular, that the population associates with hate crimes against refugees.
Investigating the full spectrum of suicide
A recent study published in Injury Prevention described a method for categorizing self-injury mortality (SIM) to help us better examine national trends for today's epidemics of suicide and drug-related deaths.
New approach to slowing nearsightedness in children shows promise
Combining 2 different treatment methods to slow the progression of myopia may deliver better results than either can achieve on their own.
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Researchers have discovered that a key cell type involved in liver injury and cancer consists of two cellular families with different origins and functions.
How status sticks to genes
Life at the bottom of the social ladder may have long-term health effects that even upward mobility can't undo, according to new research in monkeys.
Highest mortality risks for poor and unemployed
Large dataset shows that income, work status and education have a clear influence on mortality in Germany.
Researchers solve puzzle about link between genetic mutations, mating in fruit flies
More than a century ago, early geneticists showed that the inheritance of a single mutation by fruit flies can change the insect's body color and simultaneously disrupt its mating behavior.
Tiny droplets allow bacteria to survive daytime dryness on leaves
Microscopic droplets on the surface of leaves give refuge to bacteria that otherwise may not survive during the dry daytime, according to a new study published today in eLife.
Gene mutation in the chloride channel triggers rare high blood pressure syndrome
When the adrenal gland produces too much aldosterone, this often leads to high blood pressure and kidney damage (hyperaldosteronism).
Going against the flow around a supermassive black hole
At the center of a galaxy called NGC 1068, a supermassive black hole hides within a thick doughnut-shaped cloud of dust and gas.
AAFP releases updated Feline Zoonoses Guidelines
The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) releases updated Feline Zoonoses Guidelines to the veterinary community.
NASA's Aqua satellite reveals flooding in Japan from Typhoon Hagibis
Typhoon Hagibis made landfall in Japan over the weekend of October 12 and 13, bringing damaging winds, rough surf and flooding rains.
Quantum physics: Ménage à trois photon-style
When two photons become entangled, the quantum state of the first will correlate perfectly with the quantum state of the second.
Clinical research improves health of UK economy and NHS
The value of clinical research to the NHS, the UK economy and jobs market has been evaluated in a new report, which provides an assessment of the economic impact of the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network's (NIHR CRN) activities to support clinical research in England.
Achieving a safe and just future for the ocean economy
much attention has been given to the growth of the 'Blue Economy' -- a term which refers to the sustainable use of ocean and marine resources for economic growth, jobs, and improved livelihoods.
A father's diet could affect the long-term heart health of his offspring
A new study has found that a lack of protein in a father's diet affects the quality of his sperm and in turn, could affect the long-term cardiovascular health of his offspring.
New report says accelerating global agricultural productivity growth is critical
The 2019 Global Agricultural Productivity Report, released today by Virginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, shows agricultural productivity growth -- increasing output of crops and livestock with existing or fewer inputs -- is growing globally at an average annual rate of 1.63%.
Predicting Ebola outbreaks by understanding how ecosystems influence human health
The next Ebola outbreak could be predicted using a new UCL-developed model that tracks how changes to ecosystems and human societies combine to affect the spread of the deadly infectious disease
Peeping into the black box of AI to discover how collective behaviors emerge
For decades, scientists seeking to explain the emergence of complex group behaviors, such as schooling in fish, have been divided into two camps.
Opening up the black box of heterogeneous catalysis
Researchers from ICIQ's López group present a new method that allows for the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts.
Artificial intelligence and farmer knowledge boost smallholder maize yields
To better deal with climate stress, farmers in Colombia's maize-growing region of Córdoba needed information services that would help them decide what varieties to plant, when they should sow and how they should manage their crops.
Association between weight-loss surgery in women and risk of birth defects in infants
Researchers used national registry data in Sweden to examine the risk of major birth defects in infants born to women who had gastric bypass surgery compared with infants born to women who didn't have the surgery but were similar based on other factors including maternal body mass index and diabetes.
Improving research with more effective antibodies
A new study points to the need for better antibody validation, and outlines a process that other labs can use to make sure the antibodies they work with function properly.
Discovered: Unknown yellow colors from antiquity
Antique artefacts have been studied by chemists, revealing a hitherto unknown use of yellow in Ancient Egypt.
UW study advances alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes along common axis
The researchers used machine-vision automation and parallelization to simultaneously produce globally aligned, single-wall carbon nanotubes using pressure-driven filtration.
Ludwig researchers develop machine learning tool to refine personalized immunotherapy
Ludwig Cancer Research scientists have developed a new and more accurate method to identify the molecular signs of cancer likely to be presented to helper T cells, which stimulate and orchestrate the immune response to tumors and infectious agents.
Controlling the charge state of organic molecule quantum dots in a 2D nanoarray
Australian researchers have fabricated a self-assembled, carbon-based nanofilm where the charge state (ie, electronically neutral or positive) can be controlled at the level of individual molecules.
The brain does not follow the head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes.
Using AI to screen for diabetic eye disease feasible in the real world
New research shows that an automated, artificial intelligence (AI) screening system accurately detects diabetic retinopathy 95.5 percent of the time.
Steroid injections of hip and knee may damage joints
Corticosteroid injections used to treat osteoarthritis pain in the hip and knee may be more dangerous than previously thought, according to a new special report.
A mathematical model reveals long-distance cell communication mechanism
An interdisciplinary collaborative team at KAIST has identified how a large community can communicate with each other almost simultaneously even with very short distance signaling.
New survey confirms muscadine grapes are affected by parasitic nematodes
Muscadines are also known for being hearty grapes, with a tough skin that protects them from many fungal diseases.
FSU research: Strong storms generating earthquake-like seismic activity
A Florida State University researcher has uncovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can spark seismic events in the nearby ocean as strong as a 3.5 magnitude earthquake.
Airborne chemicals instantly identified using new technology developed at NTU Singapore
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a device that can identify a wide range of airborne gases and chemicals instantly.
From ribbon to scroll: Gaining shape control by electrostatics
New insights into how the molecular organization of charged molecules can be regulated to transform large-scale structures from ribbons to scroll-like cochleate structures could inform future drug-delivery strategies.
Plotting air raids on Britain: Map shows devastating impact of WWII Luftwaffe strikes
The interactive map uses wartime data from The National Archives to pinpoint more than 30,000 locations that were struck in the UK over the course of the war -- including the first ever attack on British shores on October 16, 1939.
On the causes of regional haze
In recent years, the rampant haze in some cities and regions has attracted great attention, and people usually pay attention to the microscopic mechanism of its chemical process.
Super light dampers for low tones
A team of Empa acoustic researchers has built macroscopic crystal structures that use internal ro-tation to attenuate the propagation of waves.
RUDN University veterinarians developed a way to protect carp from the harmful effects of ammonia
Veterinarians from RUDN University have developed a way to increase the resistance of carp, the most common fish in fish farms, to the harmful effects of ammonia, which is found in almost all water bodies.
Pro-science vs anti-science debates
Recent attacks on 'grievance' studies have occasioned renewed attention to the politics of knowledge in the academy.
Natural loss of foot muscle in rodents shares mechanisms often associated with disease and injury
New insight on how the natural loss of foot muscles occurred in rodents and other species during their evolution has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.
Rare 'itinerant breeding' behavior revealed in California bird
Only two bird species have ever been shown to undertake what scientists call 'itinerant breeding': nesting in one area, migrating to another region, and nesting again there within the same year, to take advantage of shifting food resources.
Painless tape strips used to detect molecular changes in skin of children with eczema
In a study using non-invasive tape strips in young children with eczema (or atopic dermatitis), researchers found many molecular signs of immune dysfunction and skin changes that relate to disease activity.
AI could offer warnings about serious side effects of drug-drug interactions
Researchers at Penn State have developed a machine learning system that may be able to warn doctors and patients about possible negative side effects that might occur when drugs are mixed.
New findings about mechanisms regulating brain inflammation
These new findings about mechanisms regulating brain inflammation open a new pathway in the field of neuroinflammation.
Global trial is first clear evidence that widely available drug reduces head injury deaths
A low cost and widely available drug could reduce deaths in traumatic brain injury patients by as much as 20%, depending on the severity of injury, according to a major study led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and published in The Lancet.
'Whoa, I didn't expect that'
Babies seek to understand the world around them and learn many new things every day.
Scientists develop cell-material feedback platform for small-scale biologics production
YOU Lingchong, a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Duke University, and Associate Professor DAI Zhuojun at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a concise platform to achieve versatile production together with analysis and purification of diverse proteins and protein complexes by exploiting cell-material feedback.
New method for quicker and simpler production of lipidated proteins
The new method developed at TU Graz and the University of Vienna is leading to a better understanding of natural protein modifications and improved protein therapeutics.
Mindfulness may reduce opioid cravings, study finds
People suffering from opioid addiction and chronic pain may have fewer cravings and less pain if they use both mindfulness techniques and medication for opioid dependence, according to Rutgers and other researchers.
Genetic differences in the immune system shape the microbiome
Genetic differences in the immune system shape the collections of bacteria that colonize the digestive system, according to new research by scientists at the University of Chicago.
Research highlights importance of religious vote amid changing social landscape
Canadians who consider religion to be important in their lives were still more likely to vote for the Conservative Party in 2015, finds new research from the University of Waterloo.
Startled fish escape using several distinct neuronal circuits
A fast knee-jerk 'ballistic' escape response and a more considered 'delayed' escape response are mediated by distinct and parallel neuronal pathways in zebrafish, according to a study published October 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Harold Burgess of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and colleagues.
Protein misfolding as a risk marker for Alzheimer's disease
In symptom-free individuals, the detection of misfolded amyloid-β protein in the blood indicated a considerably higher risk of Alzheimer's disease -- up to 14 years before a clinical diagnosis was made.
Quantum paradox experiment may lead to more accurate clocks and sensors
More accurate clocks and sensors may result from a recently proposed experiment, linking an Einstein-devised paradox to quantum mechanics.
Both Democrat and Republican likely voters strongly support sex education in schools
Democrats and Republicans disagree on many policies but not on sex education for teenagers, a Rutgers-led national survey finds.
Did early mammals turn to night life to protect their sperm?
Humans are diurnal -- we are active in the day and sleep at night.
NASA provides a farewell infrared view of extra-tropical storm Melissa
NASA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over North Atlantic Ocean on Oct.
Factors that predict obesity by adolescence revealed
Three simple factors that predict whether a healthy weight child will be overweight or obese by adolescence have been revealed in a new study led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI).
Making conservation 'contagious'
New research reveals conservation initiatives often spread like disease, a fact which can help scientists and policymakers design programs more likely to be taken up.
Creating miracles with polymeric fibers
Mohan Edirisinghe leads a team at University College London studying the fabrication of polymeric nanofibers and microfibers -- very thin fibers made up of polymers.
First smart speaker system that uses white noise to monitor infants' breathing
University of Washington researchers have developed a new smart speaker skill that lets a device use white noise to both soothe sleeping babies and monitor their breathing and movement.
Mindfulness meditation training alters how we process fearful memories
Participating in an eight-week mindfulness meditation program appears to alter how the brain processes fear memories.
Increased risk of tularemia as the climate changes
Researchers at Stockholm University have developed a method for statistically predicting impacts of climate change on outbreaks of tularemia in humans.
RUDN University soil scientists found out how abandoned arable land restores
Soil scientists from RUDN University have found that the rate of accumulation of organic carbon in wild, cultivated, and abandoned soils depends mainly on the type and composition of the soil, and, to a lesser extent, on the time elapsed since it was no longer cultivated.
Chemists create self-assembling material with suite of new properties
Chemists from Trinity College Dublin have created a new material that self-assembles into 2D networks in a predictable and reproducible manner.
Receptor complexes on the assembly line
Researchers decipher assembly of glutamate receptors and its importance for memory formation.
Researchers describe a survival strategy in living corals which was only seen in fossil records
Some corals can recover after massive mortality episodes caused by the water temperature rise.
Analysis of Galileo's Jupiter entry probe reveals gaps in heat shield modeling
The entry probe of the Galileo mission to Jupiter entered the planet's atmosphere in 1995 in fiery fashion, generating enough heat to cause plasma reactions on its surface.
The Physiological Society urges Government step change to meet its own Ageing Society target
The UK Government is at risk of missing its target to increase healthy life expectancy by five years by 2035, according to a new report, Growing Older, Better, published by The Physiological Society on Tuesday Oct.
To reduce gun violence, lift roadblocks to firearm data
While gun violence in America kills more than 35,000 people a year and as calls for policies to stem the crisis grow, University of Washington researchers point out in a new analysis that barriers to data stand in the way of advancing solutions.
US green economy worth $1.3 trillion per year, but new policies needed to maintain growth
The US green economy is estimated to generate over $1.3 trillion in revenue per year, representing 16.5% of the global green economy, according to a new study by UCL.
Putting the power of a film director in an autonomous drone
Commercial drone products can tackle some automated tasks, but one thing those systems don't address is filming artistically.
Urbanisation costs Edinburgh over 11 hectares of green land each year
Edinburgh is losing the equivalent of around 15 football pitches of green land each year, much of which is due to private garden areas being paved over or built on, according to a new report by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology.
NYU Abu Dhabi researchers release a new genome sequence of the date palm
Researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi's Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (NYUAD CGSB) and the UAEU Khalifa Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (KCGEB), working with other institutions, have developed an improved assembly of the genome for the date palm using long-read sequencing technology.
Heron survey fishes out detail in ghostly galaxy outskirts
Astronomers have completed the largest survey to date of the faint outskirts of nearby galaxies, successfully testing a low-cost system for exploring these local stellar systems.
New DNA 'clock' could help measure development in young children
Scientists have developed a molecular 'clock' that could reshape how pediatricians measure and monitor childhood growth and potentially allow for an earlier diagnosis of life-altering development disorders.
Researchers discover potential therapy to treat detrimental effects of marijuana
A University of Maryland School of Medicine study using a preclinical animal model suggests that prenatal exposure to THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis, makes the brain's dopamine neurons (an integral component of the reward system) hyperactive and increases sensitivity to the behavioral effects of THC during pre-adolescence.
Osteoarthritis can increase your risk for social isolation
In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers examined information from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) study.
Genetics to feed the world
A study, published in Nature Genetics, demonstrated the effectiveness of the technology known as genomic selection in a wheat improvement program.
Tissue damage caused by a heart attack to be reduced by 30%?
A heart attack is caused by a clot that blocks the artery blood flow.
Changes associated with Alzheimer's disease detectable in blood samples
Researchers have discovered new changes in blood samples associated with Alzheimer's disease.
Brain networks more stable in individuals with higher cognitive abilities
Brain imaging study investigates why cognitive abilities differ between individuals.
New treatment combination could work against broader array of cancer cells, study finds
In continuing efforts to find novel ways to kill cancer cells, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have identified a new pathway that leads to the destruction of cancer cells.
Targeting deeply held values crucial for inspiring pro-environmental behavior
Given the alarming pace of climate change, it is increasingly important to understand what factors motivate people to take action - or not - on environmental issues.
Chains of atoms move at lightning speed inside metals
A phenomenon that has previously been seen when researchers simulate the properties of planet cores at extreme pressures has now also been observed in pure titanium at atmospheric pressure.
Diversity may be key to reducing errors in quantum computing
In quantum computing, as in team building, a little diversity can help get the job done better, computer scientists have discovered.
'I predict your words': that is how we understand what others say to us
We are at a fun but noisy party: how can we understand the words someone is saying to us despite the background music and voices?
Solving the mystery of quantum light in thin layers
Tungsten diselenide emits light with very special properties. Nobody could tell why -- but now, scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have solved the riddle: a combination of atomic defects in the material and microscopic distortion is responsible for the remarkable effect.
NASA's Terra satellite catches a glimpse of a fleeting Ema
Tropical Storm Ema had a very short life, but NASA's Terra satellite caught a glimpse of the storm before it dissipated in the Central Pacific Ocean.
Frailty: The rising global health burden for an aging society
Despite the evidence on risk factors for frailty, and the substantial progress that has been made in frailty awareness, the biological mechanisms underlying its development are still far from understood and translation from research to clinical practice remains a challenge.
Women get half the number of heart attack treatments as men
Women receive poorer heart attack treatment than men, even when rates of diagnosis are the same, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
New class of drugs could stop cancers developing treatment resistance
Scientists at Massey University in New Zealand have taken the first step towards a new class of drug that could stop cancer from becoming resistant to treatment.
Calcium batteries: New electrolytes, enhanced properties
Calcium-based batteries promise to reach a high energy density at low manufacturing costs.
Geologists reveal anoxia caused loss in biodiversity in ancient seas
Since 2016 the researchers of the Department of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology have been engaged in a research project analysing the causes of Silurian biodiversity crisis.
Physicists shed new light on how liquids behave with other materials
Using a range of theoretical and simulation approaches, physicists from the University of Bristol have shown that liquids in contact with substrates can exhibit a finite number of classes of behavior and identify the important new ones.
More aggressive blood pressure control benefits brains of older adults
The UConn Health study followed 199 hypertension patients 75 years of age and older for 3 years.
Dynamic pattern of Skyrmions observed
Tiny magnetic vortices known as skyrmions form in certain magnetic materials, such as Cu2OSeO3.
Piranha fish swap old teeth for new simultaneously
With the help of new technologies, a team led by the University of Washington has confirmed that piranhas lose and regrow all the teeth on one side of their face multiple times throughout their lives.
Novel technique helps explain why bright light keeps us awake
Researchers at the Salk Institute and UC San Diego are reporting a novel technique for tracing the activity of individual nerve fibers known as axons, and determining how neurons communicate.
Weight-loss surgery cuts risk of birth defects
Children born to women who underwent gastric bypass surgery before becoming pregnant had a lower risk of major birth defects than children born to women who had severe obesity at the start of their pregnancy.
Inactive receptor renders cancer immunotherapies ineffective
The aim of immunotherapies is to enable the immune system once again to fight cancer on its own.
Monkeys can also thank their body for vocal development, not only their brain
Development of vocal behavior during maturation is typically attributed to the brain.
Drug-light combo could offer control over CAR T-cell therapy
UC San Diego bioengineers are a step closer to making CAR T-cell therapy safer, more precise and easy to control.
Inside the fuel cell -- Imaging method promises industrial insight
Hydrogen-containing substances are important for many industries, but scientists have struggled to obtain detailed images to understand the element's behavior.
Drug discovery platform may provide new options for treating mental health illnesses
Purdue University scientists have created a platform focused on finding new medication options for people dealing with mental illnesses.
Frontotemporal dementia is associated with alterations in immune system function
Recent research from the University of Eastern Finland revealed increased inflammatory activity in a subgroup of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD).
Researchers of the UMA analyze the role of kinesiophobia in individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain
Finding out how kinesiophobia -- unreasonable fear of movement -- may affect individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain is the aim of a research group of the University of Malaga, which recent studies have been published in the scientific journal British Journal of Sports Medicine, the world's No.

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