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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | October 16, 2019


Stanford study shows why even well-controlled epilepsy can disrupt thinking
A study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators may help explain why even people benefiting from medications for their epilepsy often continue to experience bouts of difficulty thinking, perceiving and remembering clearly.
3-D printed coral could help endangered reefs
Threats to coral reefs are everywhere--rising water temperatures, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, fishing and other human activities.
Mothers' behavior influences bonding hormone oxytocin in babies
A new epigenetic study now suggests that mothers' behavior can also have a substantial impact on their children's developing oxytocin systems.
New strategy to treat Parkinson's disease
Scientists have used patient-derived neurons to develop and test a new strategy to treat Parkinson's disease by mitigating the effects of harmful genetic mutations.
Distribution of highly radioactive microparticles in Fukushima revealed
New method allows scientists to create a quantitative map of radioactive cesium-rich microparticle distribution in soils collected around the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP).
Fully recyclable packaging materials
Plastics have become indispensable items in our everyday lives. But their growing production and use are threatening to pollute the entire planet, in particular the oceans, the final destination for tonnes and tonnes of plastic, a material that may take centuries to disappear.
Researchers uncover novel virus type that may shed light on viral evolution
Viruses are non-living creatures, consisting of genetic material encased in a protein coat.
How hunger makes food tastier: a neural circuit in the hypothalamus
Using optogenetic and chemogenetic techniques, researchers at the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Okazaki, Japan, identified brain circuits underlying hunger-induced changes in the preferences for sweet and aversive tastes in mice.
Are high school personality traits associated with later dementia diagnoses?
A national sample of high school students in the United States in 1960 was used in this observational study to assess whether personality traits measured in high school were associated with dementia diagnoses more than 50 years later using Medicare records.
Are we underestimating the benefits of investing in renewable energy?
Scientists have estimated the emissions intensity of carbon dioxide and other air pollutants from a major electricity distributor and highlighted key consequences - essential information for policymakers shaping decisions to reduce electricity system emissions.
UNH researchers find climate change increases risk of mercury contamination
As global temperatures continue to rise, the thawing of permafrost is accelerated and mercury trapped in the frozen ground is now being released.
'Short sleep' gene prevents memory deficits associated with sleep deprivation
The UCSF scientists who identified the two known human genes that promote 'natural short sleep' -- nightly sleep that lasts just four to six hours but leaves people feeling well-rested -- have now discovered a third, and it's also the first gene that's ever been shown to prevent the memory deficits that normally accompany sleep deprivation.
Digital breast tomosynthesis increases cancer detection over full-field mammography
An ahead-of-print article forthcoming in the March 2020 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) comparing cancer detection rates (CDR) for screening digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) versus full-field digital mammography (FFDM) found that DBT results in 'significantly increased CDR' -- irrespective of tumor type, size, or grade of cancer.
Family members' emotional attachment limits family firm growth
New research led by Lancaster University Management School's Centre for Family Business shows family-related considerations often trump a desire to grow and expand in family firms.
Bolivian forager-farmers with amazing heart health are split over what makes a good life
A small Bolivian society of indigenous forager-farmers, known for astonishingly healthy cardiovascular systems, is seeing a split in beliefs about what makes a good life.
AI system more accurately identifies collapsed lungs using chest X-rays
New assistive technology can diagnose collapsed lungs from chest X-rays with a higher degree of accuracy than radiologists.
Study finds relationship between racial discipline disparities and academic achievement gaps in US
An increase in either the discipline gap or the academic achievement gap between black and white students in the United States predicts a jump in the other, according to a new study published today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.
Competitive people are more prone to drug consumption
A Psychology research team at the University of Cordoba (Spain) studied how personality influences substance abuse among young people.
'The ethics of human genome editing' special issue published in The CRISPR Journal
The Ethics of Human Genome Editing is the subject of intensive discussion and debate in a special issue of The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
Syphilis infection rates in dialysis patients exceed general population
Syphilis rates, like other sexually transmitted disease rates in the United States, are soaring, and the first known study to examine syphilis rates in patients with kidney failure found an incidence greater than three times that of the general population.
Artificial pancreas system better controls blood glucose levels than current technology
Study based at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and other centers finds new system has safety, efficacy benefits for people with type 1 diabetes
In Baltimore, lower income neighborhoods have bigger mosquitoes
Low-income urban neighborhoods not only have more mosquitoes, but they are larger-bodied, indicating that they could be more efficient at transmitting diseases.
Livestream available: metal to metal oxide progression
Study of charge transfer allows simpler real-time observation of catalysis.
How human brain development diverged from great apes
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel, and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, present new insights into the development of the human brain and differences in this process compared to other great apes.
Sweetened drinks represented 62% of children's drink sales in 2018
Fruit drinks and flavored waters that contained added sugars and/or low-calorie (diet) sweeteners dominated sales of drinks intended for children in 2018, making up 62% of the $2.2 billion in total children's drink sales.
Ultrafast particle interactions could help make quantum information devices feasible
Research presents the detection of energy transfer from excited electrons to the crystal lattice on the femtosecond timescale.
Diabetes: A next-generation therapy soon available?
Insulin is normally produced by pancreatic β cells. In many people with diabetes, pancreatic cells are not functional, causing a chronic and potentially fatal insulin deficiency that can only be controlled through daily insulin injections.
Scientists work toward a rapid point-of-care diagnostic test for Lyme disease
A study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology describes a new rapid assay for Lyme disease that could lead to a practical test for use by healthcare providers.
Smoke signals: Study shows path linking nicotine addiction to increased risk for diabetes
Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a circuit in rats that links cigarette smoking and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study featured on the cover of the Oct.
Rice blast fungus discovery will drive crop innovation
A secret weapon used by the killer rice blast fungus to infect host plants has been discovered in new research.
Warmer nights prompt forest birds to lay eggs earlier in spring
Rising night-time temperatures are causing woodland birds to build nests and lay eggs earlier in springtime, research shows.
C-sections affect children's health less than previously assumed
A new study suggests that potentially avoidable unplanned Cesarean sections increase the risk of asthma, but not the risk of other immune-mediated disorders previously associated with C-sections.
Parental gender attitudes associated with Japanese girls' reduced university participation
Researchers in Japan have found stereotypical gender role attitudes and negative images of STEM fields of Japanese parents may be associated with girls' reduced university participation.
A highly alkaline-stable Co3O4@Co-MOF composite for high-performance electrochemical energy storage
The strategy herein is the synthesis of a highly alkaline-stable Co3O4@Co-MOF, via a controllable one-pot hydrothermal method under a highly alkaline condition.
Galapagos study highlights importance of biodiversity in the face of climate change
Study of wave turbulence suggests that highly mobile species and more diverse ecological communities may be more resilient to the effects of changing environmental conditions.
Study suggests why some US football players have higher cardiovascular risk
Research has shown that while elite athletes overall are at decreased risk of death from cardiovascular problems, a certain group of athletes -- football linemen in the United States -- actually have higher risk than the general population than other elite athletes.
Scientists discover method to create and trap trions at room temperature
A University of Maryland-led team chemically engineered carbon nanotubes to synthesize and trap trions at room temperature.
Pilot study shows even short-term 'vaping' causes inflammation in non-smokers
E-cigarette use is rising at concerning levels among both smokers and non-smokers, and new research data suggests that even short-term e-cig use can cause cellular inflammation in never-smoker adults.
A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes
University at Buffalo researchers discovered that the human diet -- a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture -- has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates.
Listening to 'noisy knees' to diagnose osteoarthritis: The first human cohort study
A new way of diagnosing and assessing knee osteoarthritis (OA) has moved a step closer with a major study paving the way for its use in research and clinical practice.
Scientists find early humans moved through Mediterranean earlier than believed
An international research team led by scientists from McMaster University has unearthed new evidence in Greece proving that the island of Naxos was inhabited by Neanderthals and earlier humans at least 200,000 years ago, tens of thousands of years earlier than previously believed.
Changes in cardiovascular risk factors among college football players
Researchers recruited 126 college football players from two programs in Georgia and South Carolina to examine over three years how cardiovascular risk factors emerged and changed, including weight, blood pressure and heart structure and function.
Hubble observes 1st confirmed interstellar comet
Hubble has given astronomers their best look yet at an interstellar visitor -- comet 2I/Borisov -- whose speed and trajectory indicate it has come from beyond our solar system.
Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change
Researchers from Princeton University affiliated with PEI reported that a bird species' ability to adapt to seasonal temperature changes may be one factor in whether it can better withstand environmental disruption.
Nanomesh drug delivery provides hope against global antibiotic resistance
Flinders University researchers and collaborators in Japan have produced a nanomesh that is capable of delivering drug treatments.
Preclinical research helps explain why fatty livers are more susceptible to cancer
Fatty liver disease is contributing to an increase in liver cancer and basic scientists at The University of Texas Health Science at Houston (UTHealth) have new insight as to why.
Report: Progress in global cancer fight is not only possible, but achievable
The Cancer Atlas, 3rd edition, a comprehensive global overview of cancer around the globe, concludes that progress in the fight against cancer is not only possible, but achievable.
Study finds brands are resilient against 'fake news' on social media
'Fake news' stories targeting corporations may be obnoxious, but a new study finds that they likely pose little threat to well-established brands.
Alfalfa and potassium: It's complicated
Expect a tradeoff between alfalfa yield and quality when fertilizing with potassium.
Exercise can now be prescribed like medicine for people with and beyond cancer
A new initiative called Moving Through Cancer -- led by Kathryn Schmitz, professor of public health sciences at Penn State College of Medicine -- is hoping to make the benefits of physical activity for people living with and beyond cancer more commonly known.
Do we trust artificial intelligence agents to mediate conflict? Not entirely
We may listen to facts from Siri or Alexa, or directions from Google Maps or Waze, but would we let a virtual agent enabled by artificial intelligence help mediate conflict among team members?
Cascades of gas around young star indicate early stages of planet formation
What does a gestating baby planet look like? New research in Nature by a team including Carnegie's Jaehan Bae investigated the effects of three planets in the process of forming around a young star, revealing the source of their atmospheres.
Cultivating joy through mindfulness: An antidote to opioid misuse, the disease of despair
New research shows that a specific mind-body therapy, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), increases the brain's response to natural, healthy rewards while also decreasing the brain's response to opioid-related cues.
Quantifying Hispanic and Latinx populations' interest in genetic research participation
Researchers are increasingly prioritizing the need for diversity in genetics and genomics research.
In a first, scientists pinpoint neural activity's role in human longevity
Researchers discover that the activity of the nervous system might influence human longevity.
Findings bridge knowledge gap between pheromone sensitivity and courtship
Neurobiologists have made a series of discoveries about fruit fly fertility and smell.
Newly identified compounds could help give fire ants their sting
Native to South America, imported fire ants have now spread to parts of North America and elsewhere around the world.
Hope for millions of IBS sufferers as research identifies cause of pain as 'gut itch'
This is big news for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients: 11% of the world's population suffers from IBS, but the fight against chronic pain has taken a major step forward with scientists identifying receptors in the nervous system which cause the condition in the hope of developing effective treatments.
Cause of drug resistance in a drug resistance in intestinal tumors identified
Researchers clarify mechanisms that allow hard-to-treat cancers to develop, and have identified strategies that could lead to new therapies.
Respiratory diseases linked with high blood pressure in lungs
Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs of both animals and people.
Hormone therapy associated with improved cognition
Estrogen has a significant role in overall brain health and cognitive function.
Strong storms can generate earthquake-like seismic activity
Researchers have discovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can produce vibrations in the nearby ocean floor as strong as a magnitude 3.5 earthquake.
How does fathers' physical and mental health status impact their children?
A new study has shown that children of fathers with poor mental health had a 2.6 times greater risk of having poor mental health.
High levels of chronic stress linked to high blood pressure in African-Americans
African-Americans who reported high levels of chronic stress developed high blood pressure more than people who reported low stress levels.
New human reference genome resources help capture global genetic diversity
Scientists have assembled a set of genetic sequences that enable the reference genome to better reflect global genetic diversity.
Bulimia nervosa and long-term risk of cardiovascular disease, death among women
Bulimia nervosa (binge eating followed by purging) is a common psychiatric disease in women.
Consumers trust influencers less when there is a variety of choices for a product
Consumers have been relying on opinion leader recommendations to make choices about product quality and purchases for a long time.
Clingfish biology inspires better suction cup
A team of engineers and marine biologists built a better suction cup inspired by the mechanism that allows the clingfish to adhere to both smooth and rough surfaces.
Examining risk of suicide and use of ACE inhibitors, ARBs
Associations between risk of suicide and medications widely used in the management of high blood pressure, chronic kidney disease, heart failure and diabetes (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers) were examined in this observational study.
New international exercise guidelines for cancer survivors
For the rising number of cancer survivors worldwide, there's growing evidence that exercise is an important part of recovery.
How partisan hate leads people to believe falsehoods
Researchers now have a better idea of why people who rely on partisan news outlets are more likely to believe falsehoods about political opponents.
NASA's Terra satellite catches end of Atlantic Tropical Depression 15
Tropical Depression Fifteen or TD15, developed off the west coast of Africa on Oct.
Computer models show clear advantages in new types of wind turbines
Researchers from Aarhus University and Durham University have modelled the fluid dynamics of multi-rotor wind turbines via high-resolution numerical simulations.
Secretive targets for CEO bonus pay signal poor performance
Investors need to pay closer attention to the non-financial measures linked to CEO cash bonuses, because targets that are not disclosed, or undefined, in annual reports are associated with worse company performance down the track, new research reveals.
X marks the spot: recombination in structurally distinct chromosomes
A recent study from the laboratory of Stowers Investigator Scott Hawley, PhD, has revealed more details about how the synaptonemal complex performs its job, including some surprising subtleties in function.
NIH scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases
National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have developed an ultrasensitive new test to detect abnormal forms of the protein tau associated with uncommon types of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies.
Study unveils the intricate way two proteins interact to promote cell movement, metastasis
When cells in our bodies need to move -- to attack an infection or heal a wound, for example -- cellular proteins send and receive a cascade of signals that directs the cells to the right place at the right time.
Recovering 'lost dimensions' of images and video
MIT researchers have developed a model that recovers valuable data lost from images and video that have been 'collapsed' into lower dimensions.
To better understand racial trauma, expert says we must also acknowledge skin tone
Antoinette Landor, assistant professor of human development and family science, and a leading expert on colorism, says discrimination based on skin tone plays a significant role in the lives of African Americans.
New augmented reality system lets smartphone users get hands-on with virtual objects
Developed at Brown University, a new augmented reality system places virtual objects within real-world backgrounds on cell phone screens and lets people interact with those object by hand as if they were really there.
Tiny particles lead to brighter clouds in the tropics
When clouds loft tropical air masses higher in the atmosphere, that air can carry up gases that form into tiny particles, starting a process that may end up brightening lower-level clouds, according to a CIRES-led study published today in Nature.
Human medicines affect fish behavior
Human medicines that act on important signal systems in the brain make fish bolder, shows a new study on three-spined sticklebacks by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden.
Do surgeons get lower patient satisfaction ratings when they prescribe fewer opioids?
A survey study of nearly 1,000 patients who underwent common outpatient surgical procedures reports no significant change in ratings for how satisfied patients were with surgeons when surgeons prescribed fewer opioids.
The moon determines when migratory birds head south
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the presence or absence of moonlight has a considerable bearing on when migratory birds take flight in the autumn.
Rapamycin for longevity -- Opinion article
The scientist discusses several reasons, including fear of the actual and fictional side effects of rapamycin, everolimus and other clinically-approved drugs, arguing that no real side effects preclude their use as anti-aging drugs today.
Premature death from cardiovascular disease
National data were used to examine changes from 2000 to 2015 in premature death (ages 25 to 64) from cardiovascular disease in the United States.
Sociodemographic factors associated with passing surgery board exams
Survey responses from general surgery trainees were used to examine the association between sociodemographic factors such as race/ethnicity, gender and family status with the likelihood of passing the American Board of Surgery board examinations.
Children are more likely to have higher blood pressure by age six if their mother used snus, a Swedish, powdered tobacco product, during pregnancy
Children exposed to Swedish snus (a moist, powdered tobacco placed between the gums and upper lip) in the womb have higher systolic blood pressure than children not exposed to nicotine products during fetal development.
Assessment of circularized E7 RNA, GLUT1, and PD-L1 in anal squamous cell carcinoma
High levels of circ E7 by quantitative RT-PCR predicted improved overall survival in ASCC and analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas sequencing from HPV-positive head and neck cancer and cervical cancer suggested high circ E7 marked improved survival in 875 subjects.
Study examines breastfeeding and risk of maternal diabetes, hypertension
To examine if breastfeeding is associated with a lower risk of maternal diabetes or hypertension, six studies with more than 200,000 participants were combined in this systematic review and meta-analysis.
Failure of mitochondrial quality control causes heart disease
Mutations in the gene that encodes a protein called ANT cause a variety of conditions, such as heart disease, but the underlying mechanism of how these mutations trigger disease has been unclear.
Psoriasis appears associated with increased risk of developing, dying of cancer
The risk of developing and dying of cancer among people with psoriasis was examined in this study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) that combined the results of 58 observational studies.
Research networks can help BRICS countries combat invasive species
BRICS countries need more networks of researchers dedicated to invasion science if they wish to curb the spread of invasive species within and outside of their borders.
Tackling inequality could save millions of children
An unprecedented study mapping child deaths over almost two decades finds that nearly half of the 5.4 million under-5 deaths in 2017 can be attributed to differences in child death rates within and across countries.
Aҫaí berry extracts fight malaria in mice
Despite humanity's best efforts to eradicate malaria, the disease struck more than 200 million people in 2017, according to the World Health Organization.
Scientists link hormone production in baby wallabies how some girls are born with 'male' genitalia
Study has made a connection between the way baby wallabies produce male hormones and how some human girls are born with genitalia that resemble those of a boy.
Reducing open-circuit voltage loss in organic solar cells
Researchers at Institute for Molecular Science in Japan report that organic solar cells (OSCs) with high mobility and highly crystalline donor (D) and acceptor (A) materials were able to reduce an open-circuit voltage (VOC) loss.
Tailings dumped into Portmán Bay continue to release metals into the sea 25 years later
The waters of the Mediterranean Sea continue to receive dissolved metals from the mining waste deposited in Portmán Bay (Murcia) 25 years after the cessation of mining activity.
New paper-based technology allows reliable, low-cost sensing of iron levels in fortified foods
A team of University of Illinois researchers has developed an affordable, reliable paper-based sensor that works with a cellphone app -- also developed at U of I -- to detect levels of iron in fortified food products.
Assembler robots make large structures from little pieces
Systems of tiny robots may someday build high-performance structures, from airplanes to space settlements.
Blood-collection device makes radiation testing quick and easy
Developed by a research team at the University of Arizona College of Medicine -- Phoenix, the self-collection device quickly can evaluate radiation exposure and help triage emergency treatment in the event of a nuclear attack or accident.
First widespread chytrid fungus infections in frogs of Peruvian Amazon rain forests
University of Michigan biologists have documented, for the first time, the widespread presence of the notorious chytrid fungus in 80 species of frogs from lowland rain forest sites in the Peruvian Amazon.
Gas 'waterfalls' reveal infant planets around young star
For the first time, astronomers using ALMA have witnessed 3D motions of gas in a planet-forming disk.
EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants
Working with clinicians from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, a team of EPFL researchers has developed a conformable electrode implant that will allow people with a dysfunctional inner ear to hear again.
Deaf infants' gaze behavior more advanced than that of hearing infants
Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult's gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences.
Mathematicians find gold in data
Russian mathematicians and geophysicists have made a standard technique for ore prospecting several times more effective.
Pioneering cell therapies for non-responders to current immunotherapies
Research led by VHIO's Alena Gros signposts a new, less invasive approach to identify killer T lymphocytes in patients with gastrointestinal tumors with low mutational burden who are refractory to approved immune-based treatments.
Study focuses on repair and reversal of damage caused by Huntington's disease
A new study examining the role that star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes play in Huntington's disease has identified a potential strategy that may halt the disease and repair some of the damage it causes.
Computational 'match game' identifies potential antibiotics
Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a software tool that can play a high-speed 'Match Game' to identify bioactive molecules and the microbial genes that produce them so they can be evaluated as possible antibiotics and other therapeutic agents.
Oxygen in hyperbaric chamber provides relief after radiotherapy
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can relieve self-reported symptoms and side-effects of radiotherapy against cancer in the pelvic region, a study shows.
Surveying solar storms by ancient assyrian astronomers
University of Tsukuba researcher finds evidence of ancient solar magnetic storms based on cuneiform astrological records and carbon-14 dating.
Making reservations on the economic hype: Pro sports have little effect on tourism dollars
Pro sports do not translate to increased tourism dollars in terms of hotel demand, based on recent findings by West Virginia University researchers who analyzed 15 years' worth of data from hotels near the Staples Center in Los Angeles.
Scientists identify genetic variation linked to severity of ALS
A discovery made several years ago in a lab researching asthma at Wake Forest School of Medicine may now have implications for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease with no known cure and only two FDA-approved drugs to treat its progression and severity.
Hubble observes new interstellar visitor
On 12 October 2019, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope provided astronomers with their best look yet at an interstellar visitor -- Comet 2I/Borisov -- which is believed to have arrived here from another planetary system elsewhere in our galaxy.
NASA-NOAA satellite catches last burst before demise of Tropical Depression 17E
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Mexico and found two small areas of very strong thunderstorms near two different coastlines.
Society is rejecting facts; medical researchers can help
Anecdotes, fake news and social media have created a skeptical and misinformed public who is rejecting the facts.
A rat's brain, on and off methamphetamine
Drug addiction is a vicious cycle of reward and withdrawal.
Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries
During Earth's last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly.
Virtual walking system for re-experiencing the journey of another person
Virtual-reality researchers have developed a virtual-walking system that records a person's walking and re-plays it with vision and foot vibrations.
What gives a 3-meter-long Amazonian fish some of the toughest scales on Earth
Arapaima gigas is a big fish in a bigger river full of piranhas, but that doesn't mean it's an easy meal.
Exploring the link between daily stress, depression, and Facebook addiction disorder
Researchers have demonstrated a close positive association between daily stress, depression symptoms, and Facebook addiction disorder.
New marker for tumor aggression in neurofibromatosis type 1
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report that their study of tumor samples from people with the rare genetic syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has uncovered novel molecular clues about which tumors are most likely to be aggressive in those with NF1.
Study reveals how age affects perception of white LED light
Although LEDs are increasingly used in low-energy lighting and displays, consumers sometimes find their light harsh or unpleasant.
Nicotine addiction linked to diabetes through a DNA-regulating gene in animal models
Researchers have discovered a mechanism in rats that links cigarette smoking and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Scientists discover skin keeps time independent of the brain
A study published Oct. 10 in Current Biology has now found that a type of opsin known as neuropsin is expressed in the hair follicles of mice and synchronize the skin's circadian clock to the light-dark cycle, independent of the eyes or brain.
Deep water sites off the US northeast coast are suitable for offshore blue mussel farms
Offshore mussel farm sites need to have the right temperature, food availability, and the right currents.

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