Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 18, 2019
Electric cloth
Evening gowns with interwoven LEDs may look extravagant, but the light sources need a constant power supply from devices that are as well wearable, durable, and lightweight.

Increase health benefits of exercise by working out before breakfast -- new research
Exercising before eating breakfast burns more fat, improves how the body responds to insulin and lowers people's risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Lifestyle is a threat to gut bacteria: Ötzi proves it
The evolution of dietary and hygienic habits in Western countries is associated with a decrease in the bacteria that help in digestion.

University of Hawaii team unravels origin, chemical makeup of Titan's dunes
The UH Manoa team exposed acetylene ice--a chemical that is used on Earth in welding torches and exists at Titan's equatorial regions -- at low temperatures to proxies of high-energy galactic cosmic rays.

Why the flu is more deadly in those with diabetes
Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have demonstrated in a new study, published earlier this week, how diabetes contributes to mortality from MERS-CoV infections, and the finding could shed light on why other respiratory illnesses like the flu or pneumonia might strike those with diabetes more severely.

Wind turbine design and placement can mitigate negative effect on birds
Wind energy is increasingly seen as a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, as it contributes to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

Can the design of a building improve the creative output of its occupants?
A study published in Creativity Research Journal found creativity increased in an architecture and engineering firm's employees after moving into a building designed according to Maharishi Vastu® architecture.

Deep learning method that transforms shapes to be presented at SIGGRAPH Asia
Called LOGAN, the deep neural network, i.e., a machine of sorts, can learn to transform the shapes of two different objects, for example, a chair and a table, in a natural way, without seeing any paired transforms between the shapes.

UK veterinary profession simply not ready for 'no deal' Brexit
The UK veterinary profession is simply not prepared for a 'No Deal' Brexit, warns the editor of Vet Record.

SNAP provides a model for ensuring a right to food
Alleviating food insecurity is often seen as one of the fundamental roles a country should fulfill.

Nobel Laureate Prof. John B. Goodenough discusses lithium-ion batteries in Science China Chemistry
Prof. Goodenough recently published a perspective article entitled 'A Perspective on the Li-Ion Batteries' in Science China Chemistry and discussed the history, current challenges, and promising research directions of lithium-ion batteries, the ubiquitous energy-storage devices in electronics.

Candidate Ebola vaccine still effective when highly diluted, macaque study finds
A single dose of a highly diluted VSV-Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine -- approximately one-millionth of what is in the vaccine being used to help control the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo -- remains fully protective against disease in experimentally infected monkeys, according to NIH scientists.

Paving a way to achieve unexplored semiconductor nanostructures
A research team of Ehime University paved a way to achieve unexplored III-V semiconductor nanostructures.

Researchers quantify Cas9-caused off-target mutagenesis in mice
Scientists are finding new ways to improve the use of the CRISPR enzyme Cas9 and reduce the chances of off-target mutations in laboratory mice, according to new results from a research collaboration.

Stress in the powerhouse of the cell
University of Freiburg researchers discover a new principle -- how cells protect themselves from mitochondrial defects.

NASA-NOAA satellite finds Tropical Storm Neoguri consolidating
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center with a visible image of Tropical Storm Neoguri that showed it had become more organized over the previous 24 hours.

NASA-NOAA satellite observes development of Tropical Storm Octave
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided infrared data that showed the development of Tropical Storm Octave in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

'Flamenco dancing' molecule could lead to better-protecting sunscreen
A molecule that protects plants from overexposure to harmful sunlight thanks to its flamenco-style twist could form the basis for a new longer-lasting sunscreen, chemists at the University of Warwick have found, in collaboration with colleagues in France and Spain.

Croissant making inspires renewable energy solution
The art of croissant making has inspired researchers from Queen Mary University of London to find a solution to a sustainable energy problem.

Is exposure to disinfectants, cleaning products at work associated with COPD among female nurses?
This observational study investigated an association between exposure to disinfectants and cleaning products at work and risk of new cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among a large group of female nurses.

Atmospheric pressure impacts greenhouse gas emissions from leaky oil and gas wells
Fluctuations in atmospheric pressure can heavily influence how much natural gas leaks from wells below the ground surface at oil and gas sites, according to new University of British Columbia research.

A new stable form of plutonium discovered at the ESRF
An international team of scientists, led by the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), have found a new compound of plutonium with an unexpected, pentavalent oxidation state, using the ESRF, the European Synchrotron., Grenoble, France This new phase of plutonium is solid and stable, and may be a transient phase in radioactive waste repositories.

Limiting mealtimes may increase your motivation for exercise
Limiting access to food in mice increases levels of the hormone, ghrelin, which may also increase motivation to exercise, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology.

All plastic waste could become new, high-quality plastic through advanced steam cracking
A research group at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has developed an efficient process for breaking down any plastic waste to a molecular level.

Ugandans and Kenyans in cities happy to pay for food that is more nutritious
Ugandans and Kenyans in poor urban households are willing to pay a premium for more nutritious flour, new research shows.

Development and analytical validation of a next-generation sequencing based microsatellite instabili
The assay has a clinically relevant 5-day turnaround time and can be conducted on as little as 20 ng genomic DNA with a batch size of up to forty samples in a single run.

Why modified carbon nanotubes can help the reproducibility problem
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) conducted an in-depth study on how carbon nanotubes with oxygen-containing groups can be used to greatly enhance the performance of perovskite solar cells.

Energy flow in the nano range
It is crucial for photovoltaics and other technical applications, how efficiently energy spreads in a small volume.

Mars once had salt lakes similar to Earth
Mars once had salt lakes that are similar to those on Earth and has gone through wet and dry periods, according to an international team of scientists that includes a Texas A&M University College of Geosciences researcher.

New polysomnography electrode set enables easy at-home assessment of sleep bruxism
An easy-to-use electrode set can assess sleep bruxism severity as well as a conventional polysomnography, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

A new discovery: How our memories stabilize while we sleep
Scientists at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CNRS/Collège de France/INSERM) have shown that delta waves emitted while we sleep are not generalized periods of silence during which the cortex rests, as has been described for decades in the scientific literature.

Rapid increase in naloxone distribution after kits became available at Ontario pharmacies
The distribution of naloxone kits in Ontario increased rapidly after they were made available free of charge through community pharmacies and reached almost 68,000 people in a two-year period.

NASA-NOAA satellite finds overshooting tops, gravity waves in Tropical Storm Nestor
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided night-time and infrared views of developing Tropical Storm Nestor in the Gulf of Mexico and found over-shooting cloud tops and gravity waves.

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed ultrasensitive nanoscale optical probes to monitor the bioelectric activity of neurons and other excitable cells.

NIH pairs cutting-edge neuroethics with ground-breaking neurotechnologies
With support from the National Institutes of Health's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies® (BRAIN) Initiative, scientists are developing powerful new devices and technologies to monitor and regulate brain activity.

Newly discovered virus infects bald eagles across America
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown virus infecting nearly a third of America's bald eagle population.

Discovery raises hopes of preventing streptococci infections
Researchers at the University of Dundee have discovered an enzyme they believe could be key to preventing Group A Streptococcus infections that cause more than 500,000 deaths worldwide each year.

A compound effective to chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells identified
A compound effective in killing chemotherapy-resistant glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) has been identified, raising hopes of producing drugs capable of eradicating refractory tumors with low toxicity.

Land management practices to reduce nitrogen load may be affected by climate changes
Nitrogen from agricultural production is a major cause of pollution in the Mississippi River Basin and contributes to large dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico.

Whole genome sequencing could help save pumas from inbreeding
The first complete genetic sequences of individual mountain lions point the way to better conservation strategies for saving threatened populations of the wild animals.

Nitrogen-embedded polycyclic compound with strong antiaromaticity and stability
Nitrogen-embedded polycyclic compounds with strong antiaromaticity and stability were synthesized and isolated for the first time using pyrrole as a key unit.

Potato as effective as carbohydrate gels for boosting athletic performance, study finds
Consuming potato puree during prolonged exercise works just as well as a commercial carbohydrate gel in sustaining blood glucose levels and boosting performance in trained athletes, scientists report.

Creatine powers T cells' fight against cancer
The study, conducted in mice, is the first to show that creatine uptake is critical to the anti-tumor activities of killer T cells, the foot soldiers of the immune system.

Genes linked to sex ratio and male fertility in mice
Michigan Medicine researchers find genes that help maintain the 50-50 balance between male and female offspring in mice--and that have major implications for male infertility.

'I Snapchat and drive!'
Researchers from the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety-Queensland (CARRS-Q) at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) surveyed drivers aged 17 to 25 and found one in six used the social app Snapchat while behind the wheel.

New diagnostic method finds aggressive tumors
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new cheap method that can identify highly heterogeneous tumors that tend to be very aggressive, and therefore need to be treated more aggressively.

Negative news coverage empowers collective action in minorities
When minorities perceive negative news about their racial ethnic groups as inaccurate, some believe they have the power to enact change.

Make some noise: How background noise affects brain activity
Have you ever found it difficult to focus on a task due to background noise?
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