Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 20, 2019
Metabolic disturbance in the brain exacerbates, may forewarn Alzheimer's pathology
A better understanding of the metabolic processes in the brain -- specifically disturbances resulting from neurodegenerative diseases -- has important implications for potential treatments.

Archaeologists uncover 2,000-year-old street in Jerusalem built by Pontius Pilate
An ancient walkway most likely used by pilgrims as they made their way to worship at the Temple Mount has been uncovered in the 'City of David' in the Jerusalem Walls National Park.

Many women and health care providers assume CBD safe during pregnancy despite lack of research
While most women of childbearing age understand drinking alcohol while pregnant is harmful, they may be less skeptical about the safety of cannabidiol (CBD), even though there is no evidence to support that belief, suggests a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting.

Autism spectrum disorder risk linked to insufficient placental steroid
A study led by Children's National Hospital and presented during Neuroscience 2019 finds that loss of allopregnanolone, a key hormone supplied by the placenta, leads to long-term structural alterations of the cerebellum -- a brain region essential for smooth motor coordination, balance and social cognition -- and increases the risk of developing autism.

Opioids often prescribed after cesarean delivery even when not needed
Nearly 90% of women who did not use opioids in the hospital after cesarean delivery were nonetheless discharged with a prescription for opioids, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting.

One-third of children having tonsillectomies benefitted from opioid-free surgery and recovery
Nearly one-third of children who had surgery to remove their tonsils did not need opioids to get adequate pain relief during and after surgery, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting.

Resistance to antibiotics doubles in 20 years, new study finds
The study analyzed 1,232 patients from 18 countries across Europe and investigated resistance to antibiotics regularly taken for H. pylori infection.

Laughing gas helpful for labor pain, but epidural still top choice
Women report being very satisfied with nitrous oxide (laughing gas) to manage labor pain, experiencing no adverse side effects to the baby, although over half of the women ultimately opted for an epidural or other pain management technique, suggests a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting.

Neural-digital interface advances raise ethical and social issues
Human-machine interfaces raise important ethical and social issues. These technological innovations have the potential to restore, alter, or enhance cognitive or physical function in humans, but also may exacerbate existing social tensions around equality, identity, security, privacy, and access.

FMT is effective in IBS, but having a 'super-donor' is essential, new study finds
The study reported today, which involved a large cohort of patients with various subtypes of IBS, used several enhanced methodologies, and highlighted the importance of donor selection for optimizing the effectiveness of FMT as a treatment for IBS.

New haptic arm places robotics within easy reach
Imagine being able to build and use a robotic device without the need for expensive, specialist kit or skills.

Preliminary medical marijuana research shows promise in lessening opioid
Medical marijuana shows early promise to lessen opioid use and potential abuse, suggests a systematic review of published studies being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting.

Toad disguises itself as deadly viper to avoid attack -- world-first study reports
The first study of a toad mimicking a venomous snake reveals that it likely imitates one of Africa's largest vipers in both appearance and behaviour, according to results published in the Journal of Natural History.

Plant-based foods and Mediterranean diet associated with healthy gut microbiome
The results identified 61 individual food items associated with microbial populations and 49 correlations between food patterns and microbial groups.

Prevention better than cure at preventing young users from getting involved in cybercrime
Highly-targeted messaging campaigns from law enforcement can be surprisingly effective at dissuading young gamers from getting involved in cybercrime, a new study has suggested.

IBD prevalence three times higher than estimates and expected to rise, new study reveals
The new evidence demonstrates that IBD prevalence is three times higher than previously reported, with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease prevalence increasing by 55% and 83% respectively between 2000 and 2017.

Space and place in alcohol research
A new article by scientists at the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation and colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh, Columbia, and Ohio State tackles the problems researchers must address to fully understand the effects of physical and social environments on drinking patterns and problems.

'Instant liver, just add water'? Not quite, but a better way to grow multiple organs
Pluripotent stem cells can be used to make experimental models of organ systems, but current techniques often produce models that bear limited resemblance to true organs.

GAS7 protein allows cells to eat
Phagocytosis can be viewed as a primitive immune system used by all cells.
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