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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | October 21, 2019


Studies of autism spectrum disorder reveal new avenues of neuroscience research
Advances in the study of cognitive disorders, including Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), may pave the way for future treatments.
Using the gut-brain connection to impact brain health and disease
Research on gut-brain communication via the immune system may help in the development of novel treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.
Exercise capacity may affect cognitive health of survivors of childhood leukemia
A new study found a link between reduced exercise capacity and neurocognitive problems in survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer.
Dartmouth lab introduces the next wave of interactive technology
The next-generation technology from Dartmouth's XDiscovery Lab brings humans even closer to the devices that they rely on for everyday work and play.
Listening in to how proteins talk and learning their language
A research team led by George Church, Ph.D. at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has created a third approach to engineering proteins that uses deep learning to distill the fundamental features of proteins directly from their amino acid sequence without the need for additional information.
Impact: 60 years of shock wave research at Sandia National Laboratories
Sandia National Laboratories physicists Mark Boslough and Dave Crawford predicted the Hubble Space Telescope would see a rising vapor plume as the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet crashed into the far side of Jupiter in 1994.
Mayo Clinic study: 20% of patients are prescribed opioids after cardiac device implantation surgery
One in five patients is prescribed opioids after having a pacemaker or similar device implanted, according to a large US study conducted at Mayo Clinic published in HeartRhythm.
Magneto-inertial fusion experiment nears completion
The Plasma Liner Experiment will soon test the potential for a novel plasma fusion concept, while offering insights into the physics of colliding plasma jets.
Humpback whale population on the rise after near miss with extinction
A new study finds that the western South Atlantic humpback population has grown to 25,000 whales.
BU researchers identify unique brain changes in people with Huntington's disease
The part of the brain that selectively degenerates in people with Huntington's disease (HD), called the striatum, is almost entirely destroyed in the late stages of the disease.
Resistance to last resort drug arose in patient over 3 weeks
French investigators have described development of resistance to one of the last resort therapies used to treat extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
No link found between youth contact sports and cognitive, mental health problems
Adolescents who play contact sports, including football, are no more likely to experience cognitive impairment, depression or suicidal thoughts in early adulthood than their peers, suggests a new University of Colorado Boulder study of nearly 11,000 youth followed for 14 years.
Study suggests a new way to think about the brain's link to postpartum depression
Chronic stress during pregnancy triggers an immune response in the brain that has potential to alter brain functions in ways that could contribute to postpartum depression, new research in animals suggests.
'Missing' virus detected in dozens of children paralyzed by polio-like illness
A UCSF-led research team has detected the immunological remnants of a common seasonal virus in spinal fluid from dozens of patients diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) -- a polio-like illness that causes permanent, sometimes life-threatening paralysis in young children.
HPV immunization program cuts pre-cancer rates by more than half
A school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program in British Columbia, Canada, is dramatically reducing rates of cervical pre-cancer in B.C. women, according to a new study.
Mayo Clinic researchers find dairy products associated with higher risk of prostate cancer
The researchers reviewed 47 studies published since 2006, comprising more than 1,000,000 total participants, to better understand the risks of prostate cancer associated with plant- and animal-based foods.
One in three pain patients suffer side effects after ketamine infusion therapy
As the opioid epidemic continues to devastate the United States, ketamine use has grown as a pain management alternative, yet more than one in three patients may experience side effects such as hallucinations and visual disturbances, suggests new research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting.
Episiotomy may be beneficial in reducing severe perineal tears among forceps and vacuum deliveries
The use of episiotomy during childbirth has declined in Canada, although its benefit in births assisted by forceps or vacuum merits reconsideration of this practice, according to a large study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Researchers identify a new way to target treatment-resistant cancers
An international team of researchers has found a different way cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, suggesting a new target for drugs.
Amazon's white bellbirds set new record for loudest bird call
Biologist Jeff Podos at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with Mario Cohn-Haft at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Brazil, report that they have recorded the loudest bird calls ever documented, made by dove-sized male white bellbirds as part of their mating rituals in the mountains of the northern Amazon.
Research reveals how migration affects DNA patterns in the UK
A major new study reveals how socio-economic migration within the UK has affected the geographic distribution of human DNA linked to traits such as education levels and health.
Overshadowed
Local researchers from sub-Saharan Africa studying the health of their own countries are often overshadowed when they work with prominent international collaborators on scientific papers, according to a new analysis by investigators at Harvard Medical School with collaborators spanning five countries.
Clinical trial in Japan focuses on avoiding cow's milk formula to supplement breastfeeding
A randomized clinical trial in Japan with about 300 newborns looked at whether avoiding cow's milk formula to supplement breastfeeding would decrease risks of sensitization to cow's milk protein or food allergy, including cow's milk allergy.
Making connections: Bringing astrophysical processes down to Earth
Magnetic reconnection, a process in which magnetic field lines tear and come back together, releasing large amounts of kinetic energy, occurs throughout the universe.
Researchers watch quantum knots untie
After first reporting the existence of quantum knots, Aalto University & Amherst College researchers now report how the knots behave.
Deepest look yet at brewer's yeasts reveals the diversity harnessed by humans
In the deepest look yet at the diversity of these yeasts, scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveal the dizzying complexity found in bottles of beer, wine and cider.
Toll roads are good for the environment, Russian scientists confirm
A team of researchers from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) developed a method to calculate the number of stops trucks make along their routes.
'Artificial leaf' successfully produces clean gas
A widely-used gas that is currently produced from fossil fuels can instead be made by an 'artificial leaf' that uses only sunlight, carbon dioxide and water, and which could eventually be used to develop a sustainable liquid fuel alternative to petrol.
New insights could help tame speedy ions in fusion plasmas
To create a practical fusion energy reactor, researchers need to control particles known as fast ions.
Lead poisoning reduced with safer mining practices
We report on an extremely successful and novel project to reduce lead poisoning among artisanal gold miners in Nigeria.  This report highlights the success of OK International in partnership with Doctors Without Borders to introduce safer mining practices in an area where thousands are severely lead poisoned and where hundreds of deaths have been recorded from acute poisoning.
Fathers are 'cautionary tales' about health for some adults
Some adults see their mothers and fathers as still influencing their own health -- but in very different ways, according to a new study.
How rat-eating monkeys help keep palm oil plants alive
Found as an ingredient in many processed and packaged foods, palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil.
Breaking the stroma barrier: Study shows a new way to hit cancer with radiation
Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are commonly used to treat cancer, but are not always effective and can have toxic side effects.
Ceramic industry should use carbon reducing cold sintering process says new research
A new techno-economic analysis, by a team led by a researcher from WMG at the University of Warwick, shows that the energy intensive ceramic industry would gain both financial and environmental benefits if it moved to free the cold sintering process from languishing in labs to actual use in manufacturing everything from high tech to domestic ceramics.
Preventing cyber security attacks lies in strategic, third-party investments, study finds
Companies interested in protecting themselves and their customers from cyber-attacks need to invest in themselves and the vendors that handle their data, according to new research from American University.
Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
The identification of new chemical bonds is crucial for the design of new material structures.
Gimme six! Researchers discover aye-aye's extra finger
The world's weirdest little primate has gotten even weirder, thanks to the discovery of a tiny extra digit.
Taking a new tangent to control pesky waves in fusion plasmas
Fusion combines light elements in the form of plasma -- the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei -- to generate massive amounts of energy.
How the mouse X and Y chromosomes compete with each other to control offspring
New research presents the first demonstration of a specific difference in sperm function associated with sex ratio skewing.
A cavity leads to a strong interaction between light and matter
Researchers have succeeded in creating an efficient quantum-mechanical light-matter interface using a microscopic cavity.
Consumers: Online restaurant reviews are not all equal
Mobile reviews were associated with 10 to 40% less likes than the reviews generated on laptop or desktop computers.
Replacing coal with gas or renewables saves billions of gallons of water
The transition from coal to natural gas in the US electricity sector is reducing the industry's water use, Duke University research finds.
Advances in transcriptomics give single cell views of brain development and disease
Advances in high-throughput RNA sequencing technologies are opening windows into how normal and pathological brain processes develop at the single cell level.
Lead pollution from Native Americans attributed to crushing galena for glitter paint
A new study of Native American use of galena increases understanding of how they were using the land and its resources.
Defining the centromere
Centromeres are the chromosomal domains at which the kinetochore, a protein complex required for the correct separation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis, is assembled.
Plant physiology will be major contributor to future river flooding, UCI study finds
In a study published today in Nature Climate Change, Universithy fo California, Irvine researchers describe the emerging role of ecophysiology in riparian flooding.
NASA finds Typhoon Bualoi rapidly intensified
Typhoon Bualoi rapidly intensified over 24 hours and quickly developed an eye and powerful thunderstorms.
Gravity crystals: A new method for exploring the physics of white dwarf stars
Grab a mixing bowl from your kitchen, throw in a handful of aluminum balls, apply some high voltage, and watch an elegant dance unfold where particles re-arrange themselves into a distinct 'crystal' pattern.
The art of cancer caregiving: How art therapies benefits those caring for cancer patients
A recent Drexel University study showed coloring and open-studio art therapy benefits stressed caregivers of cancer patients.
Clay minerals call the shots with carbon
Clay minerals suspended in seawater binds sedimentary organic carbon to their mineral surfaces.
Find FH® machine learning model flags individuals with FH for first time at national level
The FH Foundation announced that a machine learning algorithm effectively identified individuals with probable familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) for the first time at a national scale through its FIND FH initiative.
Colorectal and pancreatic cancer rates up 10% in last 30 years, reveals major study
The results of a major study across 195 countries, presented today at UEG Week Barcelona 2019, indicate that global death rates for pancreatic cancer and incidence rates for colorectal cancer both increased by 10% between 1990 and 2017.
Insects share the same signaling pathway to form their 3-dimensional body
Zoologist shows that beetles, bugs and crickets control their body shape through Fog signalling / publication in 'eLife'.
National poll: Half of parents have declined kids' play date invites
Parents' top concerns about playdates include children being unsupervised, hearing inappropriate language, getting into medications and harmful substances, and getting injured.
Real texture for lab-grown meat
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have grown rabbit and cow muscles cells on edible gelatin scaffolds that mimic the texture and consistency of meat, demonstrating that realistic meat products may eventually be produced without the need to raise and slaughter animals.
Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer
A high-resolution bioprinting process has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna): Cells can now be embedded in a 3D matrix printed with micrometer precision -- at a printing speed of one meter per second, orders of magnitude faster than previously possible.
Repurposing heart drugs to target cancer cells
This study has highlighted a novel senolytic drug - drug that eliminates senescent cells -- that are currently being used to treat heart conditions that could be repurposed to target cancer cells, and a range of other conditions.
Symbol of change for AI development
Bridging the knowledge gap in artificial intelligence requires an embedding function that helps step between different types of 'thinking.'
Closures affect 1 in 8 pharmacies in the US
Despite an overall increase in the number of pharmacies in the U.S. from 2009 to 2015, one in eight pharmacies, or 9,654, had closed during this period.
Changes in microglia impact neuroinflammation and disease pathology
Advances in research about the brain's immune system have helped uncover the underlying foundations of neuroinflammation.
It really was the asteroid
Fossil remains of tiny calcareous algae not only provide information about the end of the dinosaurs, but also show how the oceans recovered after the fatal asteroid impact.
Male deer stain their bellies according to their competitive context
The Fish and Game Resources Research Unit at the University of Cordoba connects different chemicals on deer's ''dark bellies'' to the level of competition among the population
Silencing RNA nanotherapy shows promise against pancreatic cancer
Despite advances in cancer survival, more than 90% of people with pancreatic cancer die within five years.
The brain's favorite type of music
People prefer songs with only a moderate amount of uncertainty and unpredictability, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.
The secret of classic Belgian beers? Medieval super yeasts!
An international team of scientists, led by Prof. Kevin Verstrepen (VIB-KU-Leuven) and Prof.
Large-scale afforestation of African savannas will destroy valuable ecosystems
In a technical comment, published in Science, a group of 46 scientists from around the world argue that the suggested afforestation of large areas of Africa to mitigate climate change will destroy valuable ecological, agricultural, and tourist areas, while doing little to reduce global CO2 levels.
Twin study shows what's good for the heart is good for the brain
Emory University researchers are giving us double the reasons to pay attention to our cardiovascular health - showing in a recently published study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease that good heart health can equal good brain health.
Porous polymer coatings dynamically control light and heat
Columbia Engineers have developed dynamic porous polymer coatings that enable inexpensive and scalable ways to control light and heat in buildings.
GenBank can be trusted
Smithsonian scientists and colleagues working to identify coral reef organisms analyzed more than 4.7 million animal DNA sequences from GenBank, the most commonly used tool used to identify environmental DNA, and discovered that animal identification errors are surprisingly rare--but sometimes very funny.
Island retreat: Fuel injection helps reduce magnetic island instabilities
Fusion is a non-carbon-based process for energy production, where lighter atoms fuse into heavier ones.
Analysis of US pharmacy closures
This research letter reports on pharmacy closures in the United States and risk factors associated with closure.
New deep-water coral discovered
A new octocoral species was recently discovered in a biodiversity hotspot and World Heritage Site in Pacific Panama.
Exploring the effect of fasting on age-related diseases
There are many indications that fasting promotes longevity. In recent years, much attention has been devoted to so-called caloric restriction mimetics (CMRs), substances that simulate the health-promoting effects of fasting without the need of life-style change.
No place like home: Species are on the move, but many have nowhere to go
Since the 1970s, insects in the warmer half of Britain have been flying, hopping and crawling northwards at an average rate of around five metres per day.
New framework makes AI systems more transparent without sacrificing performance
Researchers are proposing a framework that would allow users to understand the rationale behind artificial intelligence (AI) decisions.
Your healthcare provider's expectations on whether a treatment works may impact its effectiveness
If a doctor expects a treatment to be successful, a patient may experience less pain and have better outcomes, according to a new Dartmouth study published in Nature Human Behaviour.
JILA team demonstrates model system for distribution of more accurate time signals
JILA physicists and collaborators have demonstrated the first next-generation 'time scale' -- a system that incorporates data from multiple atomic clocks to produce a single highly accurate timekeeping signal for distribution.
Catastrophic events carry forests of trees thousands of miles to a burial at sea
While studying sediments in the Bay of Bengal, an international team finds evidence dating back millions of years that catastrophic events likely toppled fresh trees from their mountain homes on a long journey to the deep sea.
California's crashing kelp forest
First the sea stars wasted to nothing. Then purple urchins took over, eating and eating until the bull kelp forests were gone.
Is cigarette type associated with lung cancer outcomes?
An association between lung cancer outcomes and the filter status of cigarettes, their tar level and menthol flavor was examined using data from more than 14,000 participants in a lung screening trial who completed detailed questionnaires about smoking.
Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide
Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location, a new study from EPFL finds.
Women with anemia twice as likely to need transfusion after cesarean delivery
Pregnant women with anemia are twice as likely to need blood transfusions after a cesarean delivery, as those without the condition, according to a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting.
Forests on the radar
With freely available radar data from satellites, biodiversity in forests can be analysed very well.
Northern peatlands may contain twice as much carbon as previously thought
Northern peatlands may hold twice as much carbon as scientists previously suspected, according to a study published today in Nature Geoscience.
New CRISPR genome editing system offers a wide range of versatility in human cells
A team from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has developed a new CRISPR genome-editing approach by combining two of the most important proteins in molecular biology -- CRISPR-Cas9 and a reverse transcriptase -- into a single machine.
Volcanic ash sparks a new discovery
Imagine you're getting ready to fly to your favorite vacation destination when suddenly a volcano erupts, sending massive amounts of volcanic ash into the atmosphere, and forcing the cancellation of your flight.
Waste plastic converted into filtration membranes
Discarded PET bottles could find a new life in the chemical industry.
Argonne multidisciplinary team develops probe for battery research: Strength in numbers
An Argonne team has developed a powerful technique for probing in three dimensions the nanostructure for cathode materials of next-generation batteries.
Stanford researchers create new catalyst that can turn carbon dioxide into fuels
A new process shows promise in turning the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into usable fuels, and yields 4 times as much fuel as previous approaches.
If your health care provider is nice, you'll feel less pain
Study finds courtesy during blood draws provides nearly 400% benefit
Lonesome no more: White sharks hang with buddies
White sharks form communities, researchers have revealed. Although normally solitary predators, white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) gather in large numbers at certain times of year in order to feast on baby seals.
A technology to transform 2D planes into 3D soft and flexible structures
DGIST Professor Sohee Kim's Team developed a technology to produce 3D soft and flexible devices by blowing balloons made of polymeric thin films.
Scientists pioneer new way of finding cancer-causing germs
University of East Anglia scientists are pioneering a new way of finding cancer-causing germs.
A climate model developed by ISGlobal provides long-term predictions of 'El Niño' events
For the first time, a tool can predict episodes up to two-and-a-half years in advance.
Mystery solved: Ocean acidity in the last mass extinction
A new study led by Yale University confirms a long-held theory about the last great mass extinction event in history and how it affected Earth's oceans.
Composite metal foam outperforms aluminum for use in aircraft wings
The leading edges of aircraft wings have to meet a very demanding set of characteristics.
Uncovering the principles behind RNA folding
Using high-throughput next-generation sequencing technology, Professor Julius Lucks found similarities in the folding tendencies among a family of RNA molecules called riboswitches, which play a pivotal role in gene expression.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia offers help and cure for picky eaters
Families dealing with the stress and frustration of their child's overly picky eating habits may have a new addition to their parental toolbox.
Novel method turns any 3D object into a cubic style
Computer scientists from the University of Toronto have developed a computational method to quantify an abstract cubic style.
International research community calls for recognition of forests' role in human prosperity
What if more people around the world could be paid to keep forests healthy and intact?
Antarctic ice cliffs may not contribute to sea-level rise as much as predicted
In a paper published in Geophysical Research Letters, researchers report that in order for a 90-meter ice cliff to collapse entirely, the ice shelves supporting the cliff would have to break apart extremely quickly, within a matter of hours -- a rate of ice loss that has not been observed in the modern record.
A complex marriage arrangement: New insights and unanswered questions in plant heterostyly
This special issue of New Phytologist explores the ecology, evolution and genetics of plant reproductive systems, an area of research championed and developed by Prof.
It takes two -- a two-atom catalyst, that is -- to make oxygen from water
The search for sustainable approaches to generating new fuels has brought scientists back to one of the most abundant materials on Earth -- reddish iron oxide in the form of hematite, also known as rust.
New therapeutic strategy may help reverse autism behavioral abnormalities
Mutations in specific genes, such as PTEN, can explain many autism cases.
Vaginal tearing: Why are episiotomies down despite some benefits?
In Canada, the rate of episiotomy during childbirth has declined in recent years, but when it comes to births assisted by forceps or vacuum, this downward trend warrants a closer look, suggests new UBC research.
Computer science classes break down cultural barriers, study shows
Computational education can break down and expose cultural barriers in unexpected ways, a new study from Cornell University researchers has found.
Transient and long-term disruption of gut microbes after antibiotics
Antibiotic treatment is known to disrupt the community structure of intestinal microbes -- the 500 to 1,000 bacterial species that have a mainly beneficial influence in humans.
Gene variants influence size of brainstem, other structures
Three-hundred researchers from 3 large consortiums, including researchers from UT Health San Antonio, identified 48 common genetic variants that are associated with the size of the brainstem and other subcortical structures deep within the brain.
NASA catches short-lived Tropical Storm Priscilla's landfall in Mexico
Tropical Storm Priscilla was short-lived because it formed on Sunday, Oct.
AI rivals expert radiologists at detecting brain hemorrhages
An algorithm developed by scientists at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley did better than two out of four expert radiologists at finding tiny brain hemorrhages in head scans -- an advance that one day may help doctors treat patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI), strokes and aneurysms.
World record acceleration: Zero to 7.8 billion electron volts in 8 inches
To understand the fundamental nature of our universe, scientists would like to build particle colliders that accelerate electrons and their antimatter counterparts (positrons) to extreme energies (up to tera electron volts, or TeV).
White bellbirds in Amazon shatter record for loudest bird call ever measured
Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Oct. 21 have captured the loudest bird calls yet documented.
DNA-reeling bacteria yield new insight on how superbugs acquire drug-resistance
A study from Indiana University has revealed a protein's role in helping bacteria 'reel in' DNA from their environment to acquire new traits, such as antibiotic resistance.
A star is born: Using lasers to study how star stuff is made
On a typical day at the world's biggest laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in Livermore, California, you can find scientists casually making star-like conditions using 192 high-powered lasers.
Protein in blood protects against neuronal damage after brain hemorrhage
Patients who survive a cerebral hemorrhage may suffer delayed severe brain damage caused by free hemoglobin, which comes from red blood cells and damages neurons.
Taking new angle to enable more efficient, compact fusion power plants
Researchers at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in San Diego have demonstrated a new approach for injecting microwaves into a fusion plasma that doubles the efficiency of a critical technique that could have major implications for future fusion reactors.
Cell stiffness may indicate whether tumors will invade
Engineers at MIT and elsewhere have tracked the evolution of individual cells within an initially benign tumor, showing how the physical properties of those cells drive the tumor to become invasive, or metastatic.
American Indians may have a higher risk for irregular heartbeat
Atrial fibrillation, also known as irregular heartbeat, occurred more often among American Indians than among other racial and ethnic groups, according to new research.
The night gardeners: Immune cells rewire, repair brain while we sleep
Science tells us that a lot of good things happen in our brains while we sleep -- learning and memories are consolidated and waste is removed, among other things.
NASA finds a transitioning Tropical Storm Neoguri
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Oct.
Family members can assist in preventing post-operative delirium by as much as 16.8%
In a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers reported that training family members in delirium prevention approaches can significantly reduce the incidence of post-operative delirium by up to 16.8 percent within seven days after surgery.
Images offer most detailed glimpse yet into how skin senses temperature
Columbia University researchers have captured new images of a temperature-sensing molecule in its open, intermediate, and closed states.
Stem cell research leads to insights into how Huntington's disease develops
Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal hereditary disease for which there is no cure.
How the brain dials up the volume to hear someone in a crowd
Our brains have a remarkable ability to pick out one voice from among many.
Research improves understanding of mechanism of atrial fibrillation
Mouse model studies show that noncoding DNA regions linked to atrial fibrillation risk can display long-range regulatory functions directed at Pitx2 gene and in this way predispose to the condition.
Immune reaction causes malaria organ damage
Immune cells can be the body's defenders and foes at the same time
Assessing the benefits and risks of land-based greenhouse gas removal
IIASA researchers collaborated with colleagues at a number of international institutions to assess the benefits and risks associated with six different land-based greenhouse gas removal options in light of their potential impacts on ecosystems services and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.
Yale study shows class bias in hiring based on few seconds of speech
Candidates at job interviews expect to be evaluated on their experience, conduct, and ideas, but a new study by Yale researchers provides evidence that interviewees are judged based on their social status seconds after they start to speak.
Widespread drying of European peatlands in recent centuries
Researchers led by the University of Leeds examined 31 peatlands across Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia and continental Europe to assess changes in peatland surface wetness during the last 2,000 years.
Climate warming promises more frequent extreme El Niño events
New research, based on 33 historical El Niño events from 1901 to 2017, show climate change effects have shifted the El Niño onset location from the eastern Pacific to the western Pacific and caused more frequent extreme El Niño events since the 1970's.
Pinpointing biomolecules with nanometer accuracy
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) demonstrate a new approach in fluorescence microscopy that can be used to locate individual biomolecules in 3D space with nanometer-scale precision.
New lightweight, portable robotic suit to increase running and walking performance
A new study presenting a revolutionary robotic mobility-assistance suit was published in the journal Science this August.
Schools of molecular 'fish' could improve display screens
Researchers are using a type of material called liquid crystals to create incredibly small, swirling schools of 'fish.'
OU-led study reveals dry season increase in photosynthesis in Amazon rain forest
A University of Oklahoma-led study demonstrated the potential of the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument on board the Copernicus Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite to measure and track chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis of tropical forests in the Amazon.
Much of the earth is still wild, but threatened by fragmentation
Half of the Earth's land surface not covered with ice remains relatively wild -- but many of these 'low human-impact' areas are broken into small, isolated pieces, threatening their future.

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