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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | October 30, 2019


NIH-funded study suggests acetaminophen in pregnancy linked to higher risk of ADHD, autism
Exposure to acetaminophen in the womb may increase a child's risk for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality.
Land restoration in Ethiopia pays off but climate change necessitates many strategies
In the last decade, Ethiopia has invested more than US$1.2 billion annually in restoring landscapes in several regions of the country.
Sheffield scientists identify new potential treatment pathway for cardiovascular disease
Sheffield scientists identify new potential treatment pathway for cardiovascular disease.
Twisted physics
A new study in the journal Nature shows that superconductivity in bilayer graphene can be turned on or off with a small voltage change, increasing its usefulness for electronic devices.
Study shows how climate change may affect environmental conservation areas
Researchers classify 258 protected areas in Brazil as 'moderately vulnerable' and 17 as 'highly vulnerable'.
Opioid-related gifts from pharma companies linked to physician prescribing by specialty
Physicians who received gifts from pharmaceutical companies related to opioid medications were more likely to prescribe opioids to their patients in the following year, compared to physicians who did not receive such gifts.
A machine learning-based algorithm to predict which cancer patients benefit from immunotherapy
Using machine learning, researchers have built a tool that detects genetic mutations that trigger the immune system, helping identify which cancer patients are more likely to benefit from immunotherapy.
It takes more than a catchy headline for health awareness campaigns to inspire action
A Keck School of Medicine of USC study compared the Pinktober and Movember movements, showing that reach and engagement do not always lead people to research screening options.
To survive in the human gut, bacteria need genetic 'passcode'
Bacteria need an assortment of specialized genes to live in people's intestines -- and the composition of these genes varies from person to person.
Blockchain offers promise for securing global supply chain
Blockchain technology has the potential to transform the global supply chain and improve both the speed and security of handling the flow of goods at international borders.
A stretchable stopwatch lights up human skin
Imagine a runner who doesn't need to carry a stopwatch or cell phone to check her time: She could just gaze at the glowing stopwatch display on the back of her hand.
AI reveals nature of RNA-protein interactions
A deep learning tool could help in structure-based drug discovery.
Research into how to create self-cleaning surfaces via 3D printing
A research group has analyzed roughness and ability to repel water on surfaces produced by 3D printing and has created prediction models for industry implementation
In Southeast Asia, illegal hunting is a more threat to wildlife than forest degradation
A new study carried out by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in cooperation with the World Wide Fund for Nature Vietnam (WWF-Vietnam) and the Sabah Forestry Department of the Government of Malaysia suggests that for ground dwelling mammal and bird communities, illegal hunting using indiscriminate snares may be a more immediate threat than forest degradation through selective logging.
New gene therapy for epilepsy provides on-demand release of endogenous substance
A joint press release by Charité and the Medical University of Innsbruck Teams of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Medical University of Innsbruck have developed a new therapeutic concept for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy.
Paper: Firm's strategic orientation shapes how it resolves workplace disputes
When defusing workplace conflict, firms favor alternative dispute resolution practices that align with their underlying strategic bent, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor Ryan Lamare.
Immune response against skin-dwelling viruses prevents cancer
Human papillomaviruses appear to play an unwitting role in protecting us against skin cancer according to a new study published in Nature.
In and out with 10-minute electrical vehicle recharge
Electric vehicle owners may soon be able to pull into a fueling station, plug their car in, go to the restroom, get a cup of coffee and in 10 minutes, drive out with a fully charged battery, according to a team of engineers.
New technique may reveal the health of human hair follicles
A new method developed by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) recently examines the activity of hair follicles and could be useful for testing the effects of different treatments on hair growth.
Cannabis use disorder is declining among young adolescents and young adults
The prevalence of cannabis use disorder decreased in 2002 to 2016 among frequent users.
Intact forest loss 'six times worse' for climate
The impact of losing intact tropical forests is more devastating on the climate than previously thought, according to University of Queensland-led research.
Impact of water droplets on leaves quickly triggers stress responses in plants
An international study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden and The University of Western Australia shows that the pressure from water droplets on a leaf surface triggers stress hormones like jasmonic acid.
The danger of great gift expectations
A new study shows that neatly wrapped gifts can inflate expectations about what's inside, which means poorly wrapped gifts may be more pleasing to recipients.
Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains
Fossil pollen can help reconstruct the past and predict the future.
Study: To encourage healthy eating, focus on mobile produce and farmers markets
A UBuffalo Ph.D. student conducted a literature review of studies on new mobile produce markets, farmers markets and grocery stores, and how each affected a key outcome: Increasing produce consumption in under-resourced neighborhoods.
Mitochondrial activity in lung tumors predicts response to drug inhibitor
Researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new biomarker using a noninvasive imaging method that tracks mitochondrial activity in lung tumors.
A new high-resolution map of how the brain is wired
In their quest to map the millions of neural highways and connections in the brain, researchers at the Allen Institute have made a significant step forward, unveiling a new high-resolution view of the wiring diagram of the mouse brain.
Quality and use of green spaces may determine their health benefits
Two studies led by ISGlobal explore how natural spaces influence well-being.
To avoid cassava disease, Tanzanian farmers can plant certain varieties in certain seasons
A nutty-flavored, starchy root vegetable, cassava (also known as yuca) is one of the most drought-resistant crops and is a major source of calories and carbs for people in developing countries, serving as the primary food for more than 800 million people.
Patients with mood, anxiety disorders share abnormalities in brain's control circuit
New research published today in JAMA Psychiatry shows for the first time that patients with mood and anxiety disorders share the same abnormalities in regions of the brain involved in emotional and cognitive control.
Does crime increase when the moon is full?
Noting that anecdotal beliefs can affect public policies and practices, a 'pracademics' team from NYU's Marron Institute of Urban Management worked with public safety personnel to examine the commonly held axiom that crime rises with the full moon -- and found that the evidence is just not there.
Study calls for screening for drug-resistant E. coli in capsulized fecal transplants
Study recommends enhanced screening for drug-resistant E. coli in capsulized fecal transplants.
Genetic history of endangered Australian songbird could inspire an encore
The genetic history of a critically endangered songbird shows its best chance of survival is to protect its rapidly disappearing habitat.
NASA finds Tropical Storm Matmo consolidating off Vietnam coast
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Matmo as it developed in the South China Sea, off the coast of Vietnam.
Prenatal air pollution exposure linked to infants' decreased heart rate response to stress
A mother's exposure to particulate air pollution during pregnancy is associated with reduced cardiac response to stress in six-month-old infants, according to Mount Sinai research published in Environmental Health Perspectives in October.
Detection dogs and DNA on the trail of endangered lizards
Detection dogs trained to sniff out the scat of an endangered lizard in California's San Joaquin Valley, combined with genetic species identification, could represent a new noninvasive sampling technique for lizard conservation worldwide.
How are psychiatric disorders linked to infections during pregnancy?
Severe infections during pregnancy have been connected to a range of psychiatric disorders by different studies in humans and animals.
Mass General team publishes on highest resolution brain MRI scan
A new paper describes a breakthrough 100 micron resolution scan of the human brain that was created by a multidisciplinary team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers.
Microrobots clean up radioactive waste (video)
According to some experts, nuclear power holds great promise for meeting the world's growing energy demands without generating greenhouse gases.
Seizures in babies: UVA sheds light on why they have lifelong effects
A doctor at University of Virginia Children's is using an elegant new approach to mapping brain activity to shed light on what happens during seizures in newborns that can lead to behavioral issues and learning disabilities much later.
Bariatric surgery may not lead to lower health care costs
Despite helping to bring about improved survival and significant weight loss, bariatric surgery may not lead to lower health care costs in the long term, says a Veterans Affairs study.
Avocados may help manage obesity, prevent diabetes
University of Guelph researchers have shown for the first time how a compound found only in avocados can inhibit cellular processes in the pancreas that normally lead to diabetes.
Lost Lou Reed recording for Andy Warhol discovered by Cornell musicologist
Lost Lou Reed recording for Andy Warhol discovered by Cornell musicologist.
Study examines fetal exposure to acetaminophen, risk of childhood ADHD, ASD
Umbilical cord blood samples were used to examine an association between fetal exposure to acetaminophen and risk of childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities in a group of nearly 1,000 mother-child pairs.
Scientists reveal the physics of Jackson Pollock's painting technique
A study finds that Pollock's 'drip' technique was geared to avoid a classic fluid mechanical instability.
Concrete with improved impact endurance for defense structures developed at FEFU
Engineers from the Military Studies Center at Far Eastern Federal University (MSC FEFU) developed a brand-new concrete with improved impact endurance and up to 40% made of waste: rice husk cinder, limestone crushing waste, and siliceous sand.
How do you know it's perfect graphene?
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered an indicator that reliably demonstrates a sample's high quality, and it was one that was hiding in plain sight for decades.
Parasite manipulates algal metabolism for its own benefit
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and the universities of Jena and Frankfurt show that a pathogenic fungus alters the metabolism of its host unicellular algae, for its own purposes: the small bioactive substances that are formed in the process benefit the fungi's own propagation while preventing the algae from proliferating.
New evidence that bacteria drive biodiversity in the Cape Floral Region
South African botanists have found evidence that the largest Cape geophyte genus, Oxalis, has developed a unique association with the bacterial genus Bacillus, that help it to fix nitrogen from the air and to perform extraordinary feats of germination.
Study considers double-edged sword of trust in regulatory agencies' monitoring of firms
New research based on observations of auditors suggests that strong relationships and trust between auditing agencies and firms can reduce monitoring failures, such as unintended mistakes, to a point, but can also eventually lead to negligence and collusion.
Blood test can predict prognosis in deadly brain cancer
A blood test that measures the amount of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the bloodstream -- called a liquid biopsy -- correlates with how patients will progress after they are diagnosed with glioblastoma.
Study says Southern California earthquakes increased stress on major fault line
A University of Iowa-led study has found that last summer's Ridgecrest earthquakes in Southern California earthquakes increased stress on the Garlock Fault, which has been dormant for at least a century.
Is weight loss surgery associated with a reduced risk of skin cancer?
Researchers investigated the association between weight loss surgery and a subsequent diagnosis of skin cancer, including melanoma, among 4,000 obese patients in Sweden, who had the surgery or received usual treatment.
Tumors turn gut 'brain cells' into tumor growth promoters
When enteric glial cells are exposed to secretions from colon tumors, the glial cells convert into promoters of tumor growth.
For teens, multitasking makes them feel better -- and worse
Multitasking makes adolescents feel both more positively and more negatively about the main task they're trying to accomplish, a new study finds.
Visible light and nanoparticle catalysts produce desirable bioactive molecules
Northwestern University chemists have used visible light and extremely tiny nanoparticles to quickly and simply make molecules that are of the same class as many lead compounds for drug development.
Astronomers catch wind rushing out of galaxy
Study's findings provide direct evidence for the first time of the role of galactic winds -- ejections of gas from galaxies -- in creating the circumgalactic medium (CGM).
How Chlamydia gain access to human cells
Infection biologists at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and the University of Freiburg have found out how the LIPP protein discovered in Düsseldorf helps Chlamydia to infect human cells.
Intensified global monsoon extreme rainfall signals global warming -- A study
A new study reveals significant associations between global warming and the observed intensification of extreme rainfall over the global monsoon region and its several subregions, including the southern part of South Africa, India, North America and the eastern part of the South America.
Failure prognosis: Data science predicts which failures will ultimately succeed
Data science finds there is a critical threshold of lessons from failure that must be applied in order to achieve eventual success.
Carbon bomb: Study says climate impact from loss of intact tropical forests grossly underreported
A new study in the journal Science Advances says that carbon impacts from the loss of intact tropical forests has been grossly underreported.
SUTD develops syringe-injectable, self-expandable and ultraconformable magnetic nanosheets
The ultrathin films are able to be injected using minimally-invasive syringe needles and can be used as a platform to deliver molecular and cellular drugs.
Enter the exosome: WVU researcher studies how cancer and immune cells communicate
David Klinke, a researcher with the West Virginia University School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, is deciphering the contents of exosomes that cancer cells release.
Bacterial arms race may shape gut microbiome
University of Washington Researchers wanted to understand what forces drive the composition and ecology of microbes that live in people's guts.
How did weight-loss surgery affect long-term health care expenses?
This observational study of nearly 10,000 veterans with severe obesity compared health care expenditures for veterans who had weight-loss surgery with those who didn't during up to 10 years of follow-up.
Movement patterns predict frailty and disability in the elderly
Elderly people who show more random changes in daily movement tend to be at greater risk of frailty, disability and death, according to a large study involving 1,275 individuals over the course of 13 years.
Nanoceramics from the ball mill
Nanometer-sized corundum particles for automotive catalysts and particularly stable ceramics can now be produced amazingly easily.
Racial discrimination linked to suicidal thoughts in African American men
Suicide deaths among African American men have risen dramatically during the last 20 years, and racial discrimination may be a contributing factor in many cases, say University of Michigan researchers.
Cumulative environmental exposures increase diabetes risk in rural populations
Cumulative environmental exposures affect rural and urban populations differently when it comes to diabetes risk.
Predicting frailty, disability and death
In a study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, researchers analyzed patterns of movement among elderly study participants and found that irregular, spontaneous fluctuations could predict a person's risk of frailty, disability and death years later.
Bacteria and fungi show a precise daily rhythm in tropical air, finds NTU
Scientists from the Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE) at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have found that the air in the tropics is teeming with a rich and diverse range of at least 725 different microorganisms.
Insect decline more extensive than suspected
Compared to a decade ago, today the number of insect species on many areas has decreased by about one third.
Human reflexes keep two-legged robot upright
Imagine being trapped inside a collapsed building after a disaster, wondering if anybody will be brave enough to rescue you.
Efficient hydrogen conversion via PEC water splitting using hematite mesocrystals
A research group led by Associate Professor Takashi Tachikawa of Kobe University's Molecular Photoscience Research Center has succeeded in developing photocatalysts that can convert an efficient level of hydrogen from water using solar light.
NASA find Tropical Cyclone Kyarr with a cloud-filled eye
NASA satellite imagery revealed that Tropical Cyclone Kyarr has maintained its eye, although that eye has become cloud-filled.
Researchers use 3D printing to make glass optical fiber preform
Researchers have developed a way to use 3D printing to create a preform that can be drawn into silica glass optical fibers, which form the backbone of the global telecommunications network.
HIV drug stops Zika infection, strategy could halt infections caused by related viruses
In a new study published in Molecular Therapy, Temple researchers report that a drug used in the treatment of HIV also suppresses Zika virus infection.
Two million-year-old ice provides snapshot of Earth's greenhouse gas history
Two million-year old ice from Antarctica recently uncovered by a team of researchers provides a clearer picture into the connections between greenhouse gases and climate in ancient times and will help scientists understand future climate change.
News about drug delivery
Nanocontainer for drugs can have their pitfalls: If they are too heavily loaded, they will only dissolve poorly.
Building a better way to figure out how cells work
An 'elegant engineering solution to a longstanding problem.' UD researchers have created a new traction force microscopy (TFM) platform to measure the forces generated by cells on their surrounding environments.
Of all professions, construction workers most likely to use opioids and cocaine
Construction workers are more likely to use drugs than workers in other professions, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU College of Global Public Health.
World first on-the-spot test for synthetic drug 'spice' developed at University of Bath
A simple saliva test to detect if someone has recently taken the street drug ''spice'' has been developed at the University of Bath - the first such test ever created.
New research suggests proton radiation can benefit pts with challenging liver tumors
Two new studies support and inform the use of proton radiation therapy to treat patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a common but often fatal type of liver cancer for which there are limited treatment options.
Lithium ion battery design can charge an electric vehicle in 10 minutes
Scientist have developed a lithium ion battery that charges at an elevated temperature but keeps the cell cool during discharge, showing the potential to add 200 miles of driving range to an electric car in 10 minutes.
Abrupt shifts in Arctic climate projected
Researchers from McGill University project that as the permafrost continues to degrade, the climate in various regions of the Arctic could potentially change abruptly in the relatively near future.
In blacks with Alzheimer's gene, higher education may be protective
A new study from Columbia University found that a higher level of education protected against cognitive decline in black people with a gene linked to Alzheimer's disease.
Climate models and geology reveal new insights into the East Asian monsoon
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have used climate models and geological records to better understand changes in the East Asian monsoon over long geologic time scales.
Were those experiment results really so predictable? These researchers aim to find out
Stefano DellaVigna of UC Berkeley, Devin Pope of the University of Chicago's Booth School of Business, and Eva Vivalt of the Research School of Economics at Australian National University have launched a website that will allow researchers, Ph.D. students, and even members of the general public to review proposed research projects and make predictions on the outcome.
Research brief: Invention of shape-changing textiles powered only by body heat
A new study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota's Design of Active Materials and Structures Lab (DAMSL) and Wearable Technology Lab (WTL) details the development of a temperature-responsive textile that can be used to create self-fitting garments powered only by body heat.
Aircraft pilots usually cannot spot an encroaching drone, study shows
Skilled pilots approaching a runway usually can't see small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) encroaching on their airspace, and they virtually never detect motionless drones, researchers at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Oklahoma State University have reported.
Traffic exhaust at residential address increases the risk of stroke
High levels of traffic exhaust at one's residence increases the risk of stroke even in low-pollution environments, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and other universities in Sweden.
The secrets behind a creepy photographic technique
In the 1960s, a French artist named Jean-Pierre Sudre began experimenting with an obscure 19th-century photographic process, creating dramatic black-and-white photographs with ethereal veiling effects.
Coordinated brain activation supports spatial learning and decision-making
Specialized brain activation 'replays' the possible routes that rats can take as they navigate a space, helping them keep track of the paths they've already taken and choose among the routes that they can take next, according to a National Institutes of Health-funded study published in the journal Neuron.
Gallbladder removal linked to better outcomes when performed soon after hospital admission
Surgeons report a 72-hour delay increases the odds of complications and 30-day readmissions, lengthens hospital stays, and may make patients likelier to need open operations.
System provides cooling with no electricity
Imagine a device that can sit outside under blazing sunlight on a clear day, and without using any power cool things down by more than 23 degrees Fahrenheit (13 degrees Celsius).
The financial benefits of being bilingual
A new study shows that thinking in a foreign language may help people be more objective when deciding on a price to sell an item.
Double-sided tape for tissues could replace surgical sutures
Inspired by a sticky substance spiders use to catch prey, MIT engineers designed a double-sided tape that can rapidly seal tissues together.
Key gene in familial Alzheimer's disease regulates neuronal development
An international team of researchers led by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona describes a new route that promotes differentiation of neurons.
What makes the Earth's surface move?
Do tectonic plates move because of motion in the Earth's mantle, or is the mantle driven by the plates' movement?
Researchers double sorghum grain yield to improve food supply
A set of genes that make up the biosynthetic pathway controlling hormone production in sorghum plants can influence the number of flowers and seeds produced per plant.
Machine learning leads to novel way to track tremor severity in Parkinson's patients
Physical exams only provide a snapshot of a Parkinson's patient's daily tremor experience.
Research on antibiotic use desperately needed as resistance crisis looms
Overuse of antibiotics in healthcare contributes to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, resulting in 2 million infections and 100,000 deaths in the US each year, but research is lacking to inform antibiotic stewardship programs aimed at reining in unnecessary use of these powerful drugs, according to a Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) white paper published today in its journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.
Bacterial arsenic efflux genes enabled plants to transport boron efficiently
- Nodulin26-like-intrinsic-proteins (NIPs) are essential for the transport of silicon and boron in plants.
New study: 1 in 7 child deaths result from pneumonia, the flu, & other LRIs
Despite large declines since 1990 in child deaths from pneumonia and the flu, these and other lower respiratory infections (LRIs) remain a leading killer of children under age 5.
TalTech immunologists develop new leucocyte markers
An article entitled 'Human Peripheral Blood Eosinophils Express High Levels of the Purinergic Receptor P2X4' written by an international immunology research group was recently published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Immunology.
In one direction or the other: That is how DNA is unwound
DNA is like a book, it needs to be opened to be read.
Too real, or too fake? Female Instagram influencers in 'authenticity bind'
Female Instagram influencers -- whose livelihoods depend on their numbers of followers, views and likes - endure criticism and harassment both for being too real and for seeming too fake, according to a new study from Cornell University.
Artificial intelligence learns muscle anatomy in CT images
Scientists at Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Japan, report a new deep learning tool based on Bayesian U-Net architecture that can segment individual muscles from CT images.
House developers could be the secret weapon to improving air quality
House developers and urban planners could be the unlikely heroes in the battle against the 'new tobacco' -- air pollution -- say researchers from the University of Surrey.
Immune 'control switch' could prevent brain injury in premature babies
About 15 million babies are born prematurely around the world each year and many suffer brain injuries when their immune response goes into overdrive.
Researchers describe how Vitamin E works in plants under extreme conditions
Vitamin E is a strong antioxidant that could act as a sentinel in plants, sending molecular signs from chloroplast -- a cell organ -- to the nucleus under extreme environmental conditions.
First South American insect that emits blue light is discovered
Larvae of a fungus gnat found in Iporanga, São Paulo State, Brazil, have bioluminescent properties previously observed only in species native to North America, New Zealand and Asia.
Artificial networks shed light on human face recognition
Our brains are so primed to recognize faces - or to tell people apart - that we rarely even stop to think about it, but what happens in the brain when it engages in such recognition is still far from understood.
Various stearates tested for in-situ combustion process by Kazan Federal University
Thermal oil extraction gets more and more recognition in scientific circles.
Malaria pathogen under the X-ray microscope
Malaria is one of the most threatening infectious diseases in the world.
Study finds racial variation in post-op care after knee replacement surgery
A large study analyzing 107,000 knee replacement surgeries found that African Americans were significantly more likely than white patients to be discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation or skilled nursing facility rather than home care after the procedure.
NTU Singapore researchers create quantum chip 1,000 times smaller than current setups
Researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a quantum communication chip that is 1,000 times smaller than current quantum setups, but offers the same superior security quantum technology is known for.
A plethora of states in magic-angle graphene
A team of ICFO researchers uses twisted bi-layer graphene to unveil a new zoo of previously unobserved states, from superconducting to insulating to a new range of magnetic and topological states.
After mastering a movement, mice may stop relying on primary motor cortex
Scientists studying 12 mice observed that while these animals rely on the primary motor cortex to manipulate a joystick when they initially learn the task, they do not seem to use the cortex once they have mastered it.
Drones help map Iceland's disappearing glaciers
Dr. Kieran Baxter from the University of Dundee has created composite images that compare views from 1980s aerial surveys to modern-day photos captured with the help of state-of-the-art technology.
Harmful emissions from traffic, trucks, SUVs: New national air pollution report
Almost one third of Canadians live near a major road -- and this means they go about their everyday lives exposed to a complex mixture of vehicle air pollutants.
Cycles of reward: New insight into ADHD treatment
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) in collaboration with scientists at the University of Otago and the University of Auckland in New Zealand, investigated the actions of the drug in rats.
Tiny swimming donuts deliver the goods
Bacteria and other swimming microorganisms evolved to thrive in challenging environments, and researchers struggle to mimic their unique abilities for biomedical technologies, but fabrication challenges created a manufacturing bottleneck.
Research debunks myth of Super Bowl sex trafficking, improves media narrative
For years news outlets have tied major sporting events to an increase in sex trafficking, but researchers have now revealed that assumption is a myth and that misleading news stories foster distorted views and misguided interventions that do not reduce harm or protect victims.
Name that tune: Brain takes just 100 to 300 milliseconds to recognize familiar music
The human brain can recognize a familiar song within 100 to 300 milliseconds, highlighting the deep hold favorite tunes have on our memory, a UCL study finds.
Crab disease poses threat to shellfish stocks
Shore crabs carry parasites that pose a major threat to shellfish stocks.
Unexpected outcomes: Damages to Puerto Rican coffee farms from Hurricane Maria varied
University of Michigan ecologists Ivette Perfecto and John Vandermeer have studied Latin American coffee farms for a quarter century, and they tracked the recovery of tropical forests in Nicaragua following 1988's Hurricane Joan for nearly 20 years.
Simulations explain giant exoplanets with eccentric, close-in orbits
As planetary systems evolve, gravitational interactions between planets can fling some of them into eccentric elliptical orbits around the host star.
Bundlemers (new polymer units) could transform industries
From tires to clothes to shampoo, many ubiquitous products are made with polymers, large chain-like molecules made of smaller sub-units, called monomers, bonded together.
Study: Teens who have loving bond with mother less likely to enter abusive relationships
A mother's warmth and acceptance toward her teenagers may help prevent those children from being in an abusive relationship later in life, even if her own marriage is contentious, according to a new University at Buffalo study.
Using probiotics to protect honey bees against fatal disease
A group of researchers at Western and Lawson combined their expertise in probiotics and bee biology to supplement honey bee food with probiotics, in the form a BioPatty, in their experimental apiaries.
Cleveland clinic's first purely laparoscopic living donor surgery for liver transplant
Cleveland Clinic has successfully performed the Midwest's first purely laparoscopic living donor surgery for liver transplantation in an adult recipient.

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