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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 01, 2019


How the Aztecs could improve modern urban farming
Highly intensive production systems with low resource demand are a strategic goal of urban agriculture developers.
Disordered proteins become stable, 'super-sticky' materials
Biomedical engineers from Duke University have demonstrated that they can create stable materials from engineered disordered proteins by altering the environmental triggers that cause them to undergo phase transitions.
Quality over quantity! Interval walking training improves fitness and health in elderly individuals
Interval Walking Training is a method that is effective in increasing overall fitness and decreasing healthcare costs associated with lifestyle-related diseases of the middle-aged and elderly.
NASA finds Tropical Storm Maha's heavy rain potential over Lakshadweep
Tropical Cyclone Maha continued to move north along the southwestern coast of India when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and analyzed the cloud top temperatures.
Low blood oxygen strongly increases sick children's risk of death
Low blood oxygen is more common in sick children than previously thought, and strongly increases children's risk of death, Australian-led research has found.
Moffitt researchers identify a mechanism controlling tumor cell recognition by immune cells
Immunotherapy has become a standard treatment approach for several types of cancer, including melanoma.
Reversed halo signs manifest in septic pulmonary embolism due to IV drug use
According to an article published ahead-of-print in the January 2020 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), reversed halo signs were frequently observed on the chest CT scans of patients with IV substance use disorder-related septic pulmonary embolism.
Study shows media overlook best practices when reporting a celebrity suicide death
A study published today in JAMA Network Open by researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined suicide reporting guideline adherence by the media for the suicide deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain.
Black and elderly patients less likely to receive lung cancer treatments
Only about 6 in 10 lung cancer patients in the United States receive the minimal lung cancer treatments recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
Value chain collaboration in new product development yields innovativeness and performance
Businesses looking for a cutting edge in new products find greater innovativeness and better performance of both product and company overall when working with other firms in the same value chain.
Food waste in tourism is a bigger issue than previously thought
There are major gaps in how food waste in tourism is understood and calculated, according to researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Southern California.
Four decades of data sounds early warning on Lake George
Although concentrations of chemicals and pollutants like salt and nutrients have increased in the deep waters of Lake George, they're still too low to harm the ecosystem at those depths, according to an analysis of nearly 40 years of data published Thursday in Limnology and Oceanography.
Researchers engineer insulin-producing cells activated by light for diabetes
Researchers have transplanted engineered pancreatic beta cells into diabetic mice, then caused the cells to produce more than two to three times the typical level of insulin by exposing them to light.
A new spin on life's origin?
University of Tokyo researchers used a rotary evaporator to coax non-chiral molecules to form supermolecules of a specific helicity.
Science snapshots from Berkeley Lab
New at Berkeley Lab: Gamers can help speed up biomedical research by designing protein structures with a shape modeling game called Foldit, experiments show dramatic changes in the gut microbiome after switching between raw and cooked foods, and a new porous material can pull an industrial pollutant from the air.
A new material for regenerative medicine capable to control cell immune response
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Montana (USA) proposed a new promising material for regenerative medicine for recovery of damaged tissues and blood vessels.
Here's something that will raise your blood pressure
The apelin receptor (APJ) has been presumed to play an important role in the contraction of blood vessels involved in blood pressure regulation.
'Transformative electronics systems' to broaden wearable applications
A research team at KAIST says their new platform called 'Transformative Electronics Systems' will open a new class of electronics, allowing reconfigurable electronic interfaces to be optimized for a variety of applications.
One in four oncologists fails to mention cost when discussing genomic testing
Nearly one in four oncologists discussing genomic testing with their patients rarely or never discusses the costs of testing, according to a new study led by American Cancer Society investigators.
Living skin can now be 3D-printed with blood vessels included
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a way to 3D print living skin, complete with blood vessels.
ADHD across racial/ethnic groups
This study of patients from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds who received care at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California health system looked at how common attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses were over a 10-year period across seven racial/ethnic groups.
Best of frenemies: Unexpected role of social networks in ecology
Social networking, even between competing species, plays a much bigger role in ecology than anyone previously thought, according to three biologists at UC Davis.
Heavy smoking can have a damaging effect on facial ageing, study shows
Heavy smoking may have a causal effect on facial ageing, according to new research led by the University of Bristol.
NASA satellite imagery finds Rebekah now post-tropical
NASA's Terra Satellite provided a visible image of Post-Tropical Cyclone Rebekah as it continued moving in an easterly direction through the North Atlantic Ocean.
Rice yields plummet and arsenic rises in future climate-soil scenarios
Research combining future climate conditions and arsenic-induced soil stresses predicts rice yields could decline about 40 percent by 2100, a loss that would impact about 2 billion people dependent on the global crop.
Worldwide observations confirm nearby 'lensing' exoplanet
Researchers using telescopes around the world confirmed and characterized an exoplanet orbiting a nearby star through a rare phenomenon known as gravitational microlensing.
Fluorescent probes offer fuller view of drug delivery in cells
Selecting the most effective molecules for drug delivery is often a trial-and-error process, but Cornell engineers are providing some precision thanks to a technique that reveals the performance of those molecules inside living cells.
Dartmouth engineers develop new way to know liars' intent
Dartmouth engineering researchers have developed a new approach for detecting a speaker's intent to mislead.
Hindu children more apt to echo propaganda that 'Indian equals Hindu'
When it comes to the question of who is a true Indian, Hindu children in the world's largest secular democracy are more likely than their Muslim peers to connect their faith to their national identity, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.
Chemotherapy sometimes set the stage for drug-resistant leukemia at relapse
An international collaboration has identified therapy-induced, drug-resistance mutations in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse.
Estrogen's opposing effects on mammary tumors in dogs
Estrogen's role in canine mammary cancer is more complex than previously understood, according to new research led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.
The last Neanderthal necklace
For the first time, researchers found evidence of the ornamental uses of eagle talons in the Iberian Peninsula.
What Reddit's basketball fans can tell us about online discourse
New research dives deep into Reddit's r/nba discussion platform, providing a new window on an enduring sports tradition: trash talk.
Lymphatic system found to play key role in hair regeneration
To grow new hair, stem cells throughout the skin must work in sync.
New research explains why people with Down syndrome have spatial memory problems
Professor Juan Lerma's group, from the UMH-CSIC Institute of Neurosciences, in Alicante (Spain), has identified the gene called GRIK1, fundamental in the balance between excitation and inhibition in the brain, as one of the causes for people with Down syndrome having spatial orientation problems.
Cage molecules act as molecular sieves for hydrogen isotope separation
In a new study published in Science, researchers at the University of Liverpool's Materials Innovation Factory have created hybrid porous organic cages capable of high-performance quantum sieving that could help advance the deuterium/hydrogen isotope separation technologies needed for fusion power.
Helping hands from within: Live-in bacteria protect plants against infections
Micro-organisms living inside plant roots team up to boost the plant's growth and tolerance to stress.
Being physically active can lower older adults' risk for dying
A team of researchers looked more carefully at the relationship between death and physical exercise among older adults in Brazil (where the number of older adults grew 40 percent between 2002 and 2012).
New study sheds light on conditions that trigger supernovae explosions
For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate the process of detonation formation using both experiments and numerical simulations carried out on supercomputers.
The secret behind crystals that shrink when heated
Scientists at Brookhaven Lab have new experimental evidence and a predictive theory that solves a long-standing materials science mystery: why certain crystalline materials shrink when heated.
Online tool speeds response to elephant poaching by tracing ivory to source
A new tool uses an interactive database of geographic and genetic information to quickly identify where the confiscated tusks of African elephants were originally poached.
New printer creates extremely realistic colorful holograms
Researchers have developed a new printer that produces digital 3D holograms with an unprecedented level of detail and realistic color.
Harvesting genes to improve watermelons
An international team of researchers has taken a comprehensive look at the genomes of all seven species of watermelon, creating a resource that could help plant breeders increase the domestic fruit's quality and ability to thrive during an era of climate change.

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