Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 05, 2019


Zooming into cilia sheds light into blinding diseases
A new study reveals an unprecedented close-up view of cilia linked to blindness.
Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant meso
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system.
Talk to the hand
Fans of the blockbuster movie 'Iron Man 3' might remember the characters step inside the digital projection of a 'big brain' and watch as groups of neurons are 'lit up' along the brain's neural 'map' in response to physical touch.
New transmission model for Ebola predicted Uganda cases
A new risk assessment model for the transmission of Ebola accurately predicted its spread into the Republic of Uganda, according to the Kansas State University researchers who developed it.
Cleveland Clinic develops calculator to estimate 10-year risk of diabetes complications
Patients struggling with type 2 diabetes and obesity are faced with the decision of whether to receive usual medical care or undergo weight-loss surgery.
XenonPy.MDL -- Comprehensive library of pre-trained models for materials properties
A joint research group consisting of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics (ISM) and the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) has developed approximately 140,000 machine learning models capable of predicting 45 different types of physical properties in small molecules, polymers and inorganic materials.
Behavioral therapy for insomnia shows benefit for children with autism and their parents
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders have found cognitive behavioral therapy can improve child and parent sleep, child behavior and parent fatigue.
Nanoparticle orientation offers a way to enhance drug delivery
MIT engineers have shown that they can enhance the performance of drug-delivery nanoparticles by controlling an inherent trait of chemical structures, known as chirality -- the 'handedness' of the structure.
HKU astronomy research team unveils one origin of globular clusters around giant galaxies
A study led by Dr Jeremy Lim and his Research Assistant, Miss Emily Wong, at the Department of Physics of The University of Hong Kong (HKU), utilizing data from the Hubble Space Telescope, has provided surprising answers to the origin of some globular clusters around giant galaxies at the centers of galaxy clusters.
'Big data' for life sciences
Scientists have produced a co-regulation map of the human proteome, which was able to capture relationships between proteins that do not physically interact or co-localize.
Changes in high-altitude winds over the South Pacific produce long-term effects
In the past million years, the high-altitude winds of the southern westerly wind belt, which spans nearly half the globe, didn't behave as uniformly over the Southern Pacific as previously assumed.
NASA's TESS presents panorama of southern sky
The glow of the Milky Way -- our galaxy seen edgewise -- arcs across a sea of stars in a new mosaic of the southern sky produced from a year of observations by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).
Scientists studied the reasons for plant extinction in different world regions
A team of Russian researchers from Tyumen State University together with foreign colleagues studied the cases of plant extinction in world biodiversity hotspots and coldspots.
Study: A mother's warmth, sensitivity can mitigate obesity risk factors in infants
An ongoing longitudinal University at Buffalo study being presented Nov.
The truth behind the Paris Agreement climate pledges
The Truth Behind the Climate Pledges, a report by world-class scientists including former IPCC chair Sir Robert Watson, says almost three-fourths of 184 voluntary pledges made under the 2016 Paris agreement are inadequate to slow climate change.
Scientists declare climate emergency, establish global indicators for effective action
A global coalition of scientists says 'untold human suffering' is unavoidable without deep and lasting shifts in human activities that contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and other factors related to climate change.
The most spectacular celestial vision you'll never see
Contrary to previous thought, a gigantic planet in wild orbit does not preclude the presence of an Earth-like planet in the same solar system - or life on that planet.
Black holes sometimes behave like conventional quantum systems
A group of Skoltech researchers led by Professor Anatoly Dymarsky have studied the emergence of generalized thermal ensembles in quantum systems with additional symmetries.
Health care, mass shootings, 2020 election causing Americans significant stress
A year before the 2020 presidential election, Americans report various issues in the news as significant sources of stress, including health care, mass shootings and the upcoming election, according to this year's Stress in America™ survey by the American Psychological Association (APA).
Quality of life changes after weight loss
Obesity increases a number of adverse health consequences including reduced health-related quality of life.
An NJIT engineer proposes a new model for the way humans localize sounds
One of the enduring puzzles of hearing loss is the decline in a person's ability to determine where a sound originates, a key survival faculty that allows animals to pinpoint the location of danger, prey and group members.
Birth control options out of reach for many low-income women
Young, low-income women in Canada are less likely to use more effective methods of birth control like the pill, and more likely to use no contraception or condoms only, according to new UBC research.
Substance use, misuse and dependence: A PLOS Medicine special issue
This week sees publication of the first research papers that will form part of PLOS Medicine's latest Special Issue, which is devoted to understanding the substantial challenges caused by substance use and misuse and seeking to inform responses in the health sector and beyond.
Web-based calculator predicts risk of death, complications from diabetes and obesity
A new web-based risk calculator can accurately predict the likelihood a patient with type 2 diabetes and obesity will die or develop serious complications including a heart attack, heart failure and diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy) within the next 10 years depending on whether they have metabolic (bariatric) surgery or continue with standard medical treatment, according to a new study presented today by Cleveland Clinic researchers at the 36th American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) Annual Meeting.
Study reports high use of electronic cigarettes among US students in 2019
About 1 in 4 high school students and 10% of middle school students in 2019 reported current use of electronic cigarettes based on nationally representative survey data from US students in grades six to 12.
Obesity embargo alert for November 2019 issue
This alert contains a list of papers in the November 2019 issue of Obesity.
Study offers data-driven definition of unhealthy yet pervasive 'hyper-palatable' foods
New research published in Obesity and presented at the 7th Annual Obesity Journal Symposium offers specific metrics that might qualify foods as hyper-palatable -- and finds most foods consumed in the United States meet these criteria.
Blocking cannabinoid receptors affects zebrafish development, study shows
Disrupting natural cannabinoid receptors has a detrimental effect on the development of zebrafish, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.
Are students getting enough air?
Roughly 85 percent of recently installed HVAC systems in K-12 classrooms investigated in California did not provide adequate ventilation, according to a study from the University of California, Davis, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Clemson research indicates abundance of microbe diversity key to healthy coastal ecosystem
Symbiotic bacteria that live inside the gill cells of Lucinidae clams located in coastal seagrass meadows play a crucial role in the clam's survival while also contributing to the overall health of the seagrass in which the clams live.
Does climate change affect real estate prices? Only if you believe in it
A new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business shows that at-risk homes sell for more in areas where people don't believe in climate change.
Blood cancers: New generation stem cell transplant significantly reduces complications for patients
In a Phase One-Two clinical trial, the great majority of patients with blood cancers are on the road to recovery, thanks to the UM171 molecule, discovered at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) of the Université de Montréal.
Feast or famine: Scientists find key bio 'switch' that helps cells adapt
Scientists, in a study published in Molecular Cell, found that a chemical mark on histones - a key protein involved in the function of our DNA - occurs naturally under nutrient-limited conditions as cells change the way they make energy, and serves to repress genes that would otherwise drive cell growth.
Study reveals that humans migrated from Europe to the Levant 40,000 years ago
Researchers from Tel Aviv University, the Israel Antiquities Authority, and Ben-Gurion University now report that Aurignacians, culturally sophisticated yet mysterious early humans, migrated from Europe to the Levant some 40,000 years ago, shedding light on a significant era in the region's history.
'Fake news' isn't easy to spot on Facebook, according to new study
With the presidential election season moving into high gear, campaign messaging will soon begin increasing dramatically.
Risk factors of MA in patients treated with therapeutic hyperthermia after cardiac arrest
Researchers showed that 20-50% of patients developed an irregular heartbeat that required defibrillation during the active cooling phase of therapeutic hypothermia following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
Straight from the source
Arpita Bose, assistant professor of biology in Arts & Sciences, has published new work that reveals how one kind of bacteria 'eats' electricity by pulling in electrons straight from an electrode source.
Study shows bariatric surgery's impact on diabetic kidney disease in severely obese teens
Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado have found that severely obese teens with type 2 diabetes experienced a dramatic decrease in the rate of diabetic kidney disease, among other benefits, after bariatric surgery when compared to those who received medical treatment alone.
NRRI scientist sheds light on complexity of biodiversity loss
University of Minnesota Duluth Natural Resources Research Institute limnologist Chris Filstrup is the lead author on a paper published in the journal Ecology Letters this month, that suggests that species richness -- the number of different species in a given ecological community -- is not the only, nor necessarily the best, way to measure biodiversity impacts on ecosystems.
Teen vapers prefer mint flavored e-cigarettes, USC study shows
A new USC study shows that mint was the most popular flavor of e-cigarettes used by US teens in 2019, a finding that could impact proposed federal regulations intended to rein in soaring e-cig use among youth.
Scientists identify new puberty-promoting genes
A team of neuroscientists led by Professor Christiana Ruhrberg (UCL, UK) and Professor Anna Cariboni (University of Milan, Italy) have found two molecules that work together to help set up the sense of smell and pave the way to puberty in mice.
Potential drug targets for glioblastoma identified
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified 10 tumour-specific potential drug targets for the brain tumour glioblastoma.
Planning to avoid temptations helps in goal pursuit
Proactively planning to manage temptations may be more effective than simply responding to temptation when it arises, University of Wyoming researchers say.
NASA finds thick ring of powerful storms around Super Typhoon Halong's eye
Typhoon Halong continued to strengthen and has become a super typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
Cannabis could help alleviate depression and suicidality among people with PTSD
Cannabis may be helping Canadians cope with the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), new research suggests.
Helpful insects and landscape changes
We might not notice them, but the crops farmers grow are protected by scores of tiny invertebrate bodyguards.
On the road to Paris: The shifting landscape of carbon dioxide reduction
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have found that current forecasts call for the US electric power sector to meet the 2020 and 2025 CO2 reduction requirements in the Paris Agreement--even though the US has announced its withdrawal--and also meet the 2030 CO2 reduction requirements contemplated by the Clean Power Plan--even though it has been repealed.
When managing a company, less is more
New branding research from Michigan State University offers strategies for companies to increase market share -- revealing who's doing it right and who needs to make a change.
Childhood chores not related to self-control development
A University of Houston psychologist is reporting that although assigning household chores is considered an essential component of child-rearing, it turns out they might not help improve children's self-control.
NASA looks at Tropical Cyclone Maha's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Maha.
Red deer are evolving to give birth earlier in a warming climate
Red deer living on the Isle of Rum, on the west coast of Scotland, have been giving birth earlier and earlier since the 1980s, at a rate of about three days per decade.
Jaw-some wombats may be great survivors
Flexible jaws may help wombats better survive in a changing world by adapting to climate change's effect on vegetation and new diets in conservation sanctuaries.
Physical activity may protect against new episodes of depression
Increased levels of physical activity can significantly reduce the odds of depression, even among people who are genetically predisposed to the condition.
School-based telehealth program reduces ED visits by pediatric asthma patients
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina found that children with asthma who had access to school-based telehealth were 21% less likely to visit the emergency department than those without access to telehealth.
Marker reveals if benign-appearing meningiomas are perilous
A modified protein in benign-appearing meningiomas can reveal which are truly benign and which are more dangerous and require more aggressive treatment, researchers have discovered.
New research tool for studying mitochondrial disorders and aging
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new research tool for studying how mitochondrial protein synthesis is affected by disease, pharmaceuticals, ageing and different physiological situations such as exercise and diet.
Declaration of a climate emergency and next steps for action
Scientific consensus concerning climate change is well established, but action has been slow to follow.
Conservatives more likely to support climate policy if they report harm due to extreme weather
People who identify as politically conservative are more like to support climate change mitigation policies if they have report experiencing personal harm from an extreme weather event such as a wildfire, flood or tornado, a new study indicates.
China meets ultra-low emissions in advance of the 2020 goal
Scientists from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), along with other collaborators, recently revealed that China's coal-fired power plants met ultra-low emission (ULE) standards ahead of schedule and also achieved substantial emission reductions between 2014 and 2017.
Will college job market continue its decade-long growth?
Despite fears about a recession, the job market is strong for college graduates -- for the 10th consecutive year, according to Michigan State University's Recruiting Trends, the largest annual survey of employers in the nation.
Infectious cancer in mussels spread across the Atlantic
An infectious cancer that originated in 1 species of mussel growing in the Northern Hemisphere has spread to related mussels in South America and Europe, says a new study published today in eLife.
New 'bike helmet' style brain scanner used with children for first time
A new wearable 'bike helmet' style brain scanner, that allows natural movement during scanning, has been used in a study with young children for the first time.
Calcium added to acidified prepartum diets for dairy cows benefits future reproduction
Achieving an appropriate calcium balance in dairy cows is critical near calving, but not only to ensure a healthy transition to lactation.
World scientists declare climate emergency
A global coalition of scientist from more than 153 countries has declared a global climate emergency and outlined six clear steps to reduce the impact of climate change.
Mutations linked to expression of genes associated with complex traits
Hard-to-study mutations in the human genome, called short tandem repeats, known as STRs or microsatellites, are implicated in the expression of genes associated with complex traits including schizophrenia, inflammatory bowel disease and even height and intelligence.
Learning is optimized when we fail 15% of the time
If you're always scoring 100%, you're probably not learning anything new.
Palm oil: Less fertilizer and no herbicide but same yield?
Environmentally friendlier palm oil production could be achieved with less fertilizer and no herbicide, while maintaining profits.
Measuring cell-cell forces using snapshots from time-lapse videos of cells
A new computational method can measure the forces cells exert on each other by analyzing time-lapse videos of cell colonies.
Achilles heel of tumor cells
In almost all cases of colon cancer, a specific gene is mutated -- this offers opportunities to develop broadly effective therapeutic approaches.
E. coli gain edge by changing their diets in inflammatory bowel disease
In a new paper in Nature Microbiology, Michigan Medicine researchers describe how bad bacteria gain a foothold over good bacteria in IBD and how something as simple as a diet change might reverse it.
Why myelinated mammalian nerves are fast and allow high frequency
Researchers have achieved patch-clamp studies of an elusive part of mammalian myelinated nerves called the Nodes of Ranvier.
NASA tracking remnants of Tropical Cyclone Matmo
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Matmo in the Arabian Sea is it headed north toward Bangladesh.
Physics of windshield-cracking raindrops could demolish kidney stones
A plane has to be going pretty fast for a mere raindrop to crack its windshield, but it can happen.
Australia's rural doctors speak up to boost regional health services
A national study has found that longer rural doctor postings and more rural training positions are needed to provide regional areas with the right doctor, at the right time and in the right place.
Biliary complication rates similar for kids and adults after weight-loss surgery
Adolescents and teens experience biliary side effects after weight-loss surgery at about the same rate as adults.
3D-printed plastics with high performance electrical circuits
Rutgers engineers have embedded high performance electrical circuits inside 3D-printed plastics, which could lead to smaller and versatile drones and better-performing small satellites, biomedical implants and smart structures.
Study examines effect of Universal Studios Park on crime rates in Orlando neighborhoods
By examining crime patterns near Universal Studios Florida, a new study found that the location of the theme park was associated with an uneven distribution of crime in Orlando, with nearby facilities (e.g., bars, hotels, restaurants) that generated crime playing a role.
ER focus on immediate medical issues can miss the bigger picture
Frequent visitors to emergency departments often have complex social needs, such as homelessness, substance abuse, unemployment and mental illness, yet both medical providers and policy makers tend to focus on their immediate or recent medical issues without examining such other factors.
BU researchers design 'intelligent' metamaterial to make MRIs affordable and accessible
Boston University researchers have developed a new, 'intelligent' metamateria l-- which costs less than ten bucks to build -- that could revolutionize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), making the entire MRI process faster, safer, and more accessible to patients around the world.
Wild animals evolving to give birth earlier in warming climate
Red deer on a Scottish island are providing scientists with some of the first evidence that wild animals are evolving to give birth earlier in the year as the climate warms.
Scientists identify circuit responsible for building memories during sleep
Neuroscientists at the University of Alberta have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study.
Cooperating may result in better self-driving experience
To better understand and predict the outcomes of the steering wheel control dilemma, contrary to many previous studies, in a paper published in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, Dr.
To save biodiversity, scientists suggest 'mega-conservation'
While the conservation of charismatic creatures like pandas, elephants and snow leopards are important in their own right, there may be no better ecological bang-for-our-buck than a sound, science-based effort to save widespread keystone systems.
Your dog might be hiding its true colors
New research from Purdue University's College of Veterinary Medicine shows that some breeds of dogs have hidden coat colors -- and in some cases, other traits -- that have been lurking all along.
Weight-loss surgery may counter genetic risk for developing breast cancer
Women with a genetic predisposition for breast cancer were 2.5 times more likely to develop a malignancy than women with the same genetic risk who underwent bariatric or weight-loss surgery, according to a new study* presented today by Cleveland Clinic Florida researchers at the 36th American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2019.
SMART discovers breakthrough way to look at the surface of nanoparticles
Researchers at SMART have discovered a way for scientists to study the properties of a nanoparticle without damaging it -- something that is not possible with widely used chemical processes today.
Metabolic surgery cuts likelihood of recurrent and fatal heart attacks
Metabolic surgery patients with a history of coronary artery disease were about two times less likely to have a recurrent and fatal heart attack or develop systolic heart failure compared to closely matched patients who did not have the surgery, according to a new study from Cleveland Clinic Florida researchers who presented their findings* today at the 36th American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2019.
CBD, THC use during early pregnancy can disrupt fetal development
A new study published in Scientific Reports, a Nature Research journal, shows how a one-time exposure during early pregnancy to cannabinoids (CBs) -- both synthetic and natural -- can cause growth issues in a developing embryo.
Discovered a new process of antitumor response of NK cells in myeloma
The stem cell transplant and cell immunotherapy group of the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute reveals how NK cells activate a set of actions that promote their antitumor capacity in the presence of myeloma cells.
Satellite tracking shows how ships affect clouds and climate
By matching the movement of ships to the changes in clouds caused by their emissions, researchers have shown how strongly the two are connected.
Persistent drizzle at sub-zero temps in Antarctica
When the temperature drops below freezing, snow and ice are expected to follow.
Study calculates links between prescription medications and risk for suicide
A review of 922 prescription medications taken by almost 150 million people over an 11-year period shows that just 10 of these drugs were associated with an increased rate of suicide attempts.
Cancer metastasis: tumor plasticity counts
Publication in Cell Reports: Researchers at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) uncover the importance of tumor plasticity for cancer metastasis.
Octapharma USA sponsors ASA Symposium on fibrinogen supplementation in surgical patients
Octapharma USA sponsored a scientific symposium, 'Fibrinogen Supplementation in Surgical Patients - New Perspectives in Acquired Fibrinogen Deficiency,' at the recent American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting.The clinical trials discussed at ASA include: FORMA-05: Fibrinogen Concentrate vs.
AI blood test can spot signs of brain tumor to speed up diagnosis
Chemical analysis of blood samples, combined with an artificial intelligence program, could speed up the diagnosis of brain tumors, according to research presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference.
Critical protein that could unlock West Nile/Zika virus treatments identified
A team of Georgia State scientists has identified a protein that is critical in controlling replication of West Nile and Zika viruses -- and could be important for developing therapies to prevent and treat those viruses.
Identical twin kidney transplants warrant gene sequencing, researchers say
Using US transplant registry data, clinical researchers at the University of Pittsburgh found that kidney transplants between identical twins have high success rates, but also surprisingly high rates of immunosuppressant use.
High waist circumference associated with elevated risk of obesity-related dementia
Waist circumference is a more accurate indicator of abdominal visceral fat level than body mass index (BMI) in the elderly, according to a report published in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society.
Why is ice so slippery
The answer lies in a film of water that is generated by friction, one that is far thinner than expected and much more viscous than usual water through its resemblance to the 'snow cones' of crushed ice we drink during the summer.
STD crowd-diagnosis requests on social media
Online postings seeking information on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) on the social media website Reddit were analyzed to see how often requests were made for a crowd-diagnosis and whether the requested diagnosis was for a second opinion after seeing a health care professional.
Paid sick leave and flextime benefits result in significantly more retirement savings
Researchers found that workers with flexible work time enjoyed a 24.8 percent increase in retirement savings compared to those without the benefit; workers with paid sick leave had retirement savings 29.6 percent higher than those workers who lacked paid sick leave benefits; and workers with six to 10 paid sick leave days and workers with more than 10 paid sick leave days annually had a statistically and significantly higher amount in their retirement savings (30.1 percent and 40.7 percent, respectively).
New assessment could identify risks of frailty
Signs of frailty, and the risks it brings, could be identified in young and old people alike through a new assessment developed in a study led by researchers at the University of Strathclyde.
To monitor cancer therapy, Penn researchers tag CAR T cells with imaging markers
The researchers genetically engineered CAR T cells with molecular tags, which they were able to monitor in an animal model using position emission tomography (PET) imaging.
What we can learn from Indigenous land management
First Nations peoples' world view and connection to Country provide a rich source of knowledge and innovations for better land and water management policies when Indigenous decision-making is enacted, Australian researchers say.
New study challenges decades-old patient eligibility criteria for weight-loss surgery
Weight-loss surgery has been shown to improve or resolve diabetes, reduce heart attacks and produce significant weight loss, but the operation has generally been restricted by health insurers to people with severe obesity.
Mind-body therapies alleviate pain in people prescribed opioids
A new study published Nov. 4, 2019, in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine details the first comprehensive look across the scientific literature at the role of mind-body therapies in addressing opioid-treated pain.
Study shows invasive blue catfish can tolerate high salinities
A new study by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science warns that blue catfish -- an invasive species in several Chesapeake Bay tributaries -- tolerate salinities higher than most freshwater fishes, and thus may be able to expand their range downstream into mainstem Chesapeake waters, and from there into new Bay tributaries and even Delaware Bay.
Perovskite solar cells get an upgrade
Rice University materials scientists find inorganic compounds quench defects in perovskite-based solar cells and expand their tolerance of light, humidity and heat.
Popular flavors of JUUL electronic cigarettes used by teens
Estimating the most common JUUL electronic cigarette flavors used by US teenagers in 2019 was the focus of this study.
Ultrafast quantum motion in a nanoscale trap detected
KAIST researchers have reported the detection of a picosecond electron motion in a silicon transistor.
'Crowd-diagnosis' thousands seek out diagnoses from strangers on social media
A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds the public is increasingly turning to strangers on social media to obtain a 'crowd-diagnosis' for STDs, even posting pictures of their symptoms and sometimes to overrule a doctor's diagnosis.
Cancer risk drops in half with over 20% weight loss after bariatric surgery
Patients with severe obesity who had bariatric or weight-loss surgery and lost more than 20% of their total weight were 50% less likely to develop cancer compared to patients who did not have as much weight loss after surgery, according to a new study* presented today by Oregon Health & Science University researchers at the 36th American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2019.
Chromosomal aberrations created during in vitro fertilization do not endanger future baby
The process of in vitro fertilization (IVF) is often unsuccessful due to chromosomal changes that occur in an embryo fertilized in a test tube.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.