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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 11, 2019


How the Zika virus can spread
The spread of infectious diseases such as Zika depends on many different factors.
Cannabis may be linked to strokes and heart rhythm disturbances in young people
Young people who reported using cannabis frequently had higher risk of having a stroke, according to a Virginia study.
'Messy' production of perovskite material increases solar cell efficiency
Discovery means simpler and cheaper manufacturing methods are actually beneficial for the material's use in next-generation solar cells or LED lighting.
Stopping meth helps reverse drug-induced heart failure
Heart failure caused by methamphetamine use is a growing public health issue.
The Affordable Care Act's impact on insurance coverage & treatment in patients with HIV and cancer
A recent Cancer study reveals that, for people living with both HIV and cancer (PLWHC), implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) improved insurance coverage, both in states that expanded Medicaid coverage and those that did not.
Government should address climate change, health and taxes as one issue
Protecting our climate will protect health, and implementing evidence-based policies that consider action to meet targets on global warming, the economy, taxes and health together should be a priority for Canada's government, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Identifying the efficacy of treating encephalitis in leukemia therapy
Revealing the mechanism of glial cell activity...expected to be used for treatment of dementia
Free Internet access should be a basic human right -- study
Free Internet access must be considered as a human right, as people unable to get online -- particularly in developing countries -- lack meaningful ways to influence the global players shaping their everyday lives, according to a new study.
Heart disease and cancer risk may be linked
Having a heart attack may increase the risk of developing cancer.
UC research finds potential target for tumor-causing condition
University of Cincinnati researchers have found additional ways to target the molecular processes involved in activating a certain protein complex to potentially develop new therapies for a tumor-causing disorder.
PTSD linked to increased heart disease risk among female veterans
This news release includes updated data from the original abstract.
E-cigarettes take serious toll on heart health, not safer than traditional cigarettes
E-cigarette use has similar negative effects on cholesterol and glucose as traditional cigarettes.
Weekend sudden cardiac arrests are more deadly
People who experience cardiac arrests over the weekend are less likely to survive long enough to be admitted to a hospital, compared to those who had the same medical event on a weekday, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019 -- Nov.
Specific neurons that map memories now identified in the human brain
Columbia neuroengineers have found the first evidence that individual neurons in the human brain target specific memories during recall.
Skoltech scientists developed superfast charging high-capacity potassium batteries based on organic
Skoltech researchers in collaboration with scientists from the Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS and the Ural Federal University showed that high-capacity high-power batteries can be made from organic materials without using lithium or other rare elements.
Finding Nemo's cousins
New research reveals anemonefish can see UV light and may use it as a secret channel find their friends and food, while evading predators.
Better biosensor technology created for stem cells
A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and other neurological disorders.
Oxygen deficiency rewires mitochondria
Researchers slow the growth of pancreatic tumor cells.
Flu shots help prevent illness, death in heart disease patients
Research shows an annual flu shot is an easy and inexpensive way to prevent illness and death in people with heart disease.
Sensitivity to bitter tastes may be why some people eat fewer vegetables
A gene that makes some compounds taste bitter may make it harder for some people to add heart-healthy vegetables to their diet.
Scientists develop sensor to save children, pets left in vehicles
A small, inexpensive sensor could save lives by triggering an alarm when children or pets are left alone in vehicles.
Decline in ideal heart health begins early for teen girls
Ideal heart health declines between ages 9 and 19 for girls, particularly for black girls and girls from families with lower education and income levels.
CRISPR: More than just for gene editing?
Case Western Reserve University researchers have converted the CRISPR 'recognition induced enzymatic signal' to an electrical signal, which was then used to detect the biomarkers for viruses such as HPV or parvo.
Potential vitamin and Alzheimer's drug produced in yeast
Scientists prove that ergothioneine, an important compound that may be used to delay the onset of diseases such as Alzheimer's and dementia, can be produced in baker's yeast.
Teaching preschool caregivers healthy behaviors may promote healthier habits in high-risk groups
Study Shows Vascular Ultrasounds and Adhering to Interventional Education in Underserved Communities can Improve Health among Parents and School Staff.
Australian women turning to cannabis to treat endometriosis symptoms
A new study published today in Journal of Obstetrics Gynaecology Canada has found one in eight Australian women with endometriosis use cannabis to alleviate pain and other symptoms, rating the plant based medicine as the most effective way to self-manage the disorder.
Anticoagulant benefits for atrial fibrillation decrease with age
The net clinical benefit of anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation (AF) -- one of the most important causes of irregular heartbeats and a leading cause of stroke -- decreases with age, as the risk of death from other factors diminishes their benefit in older patients, according to a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
'Ghost' footprints from Pleistocene era revealed by radar tech
Invisible footprints hiding since the end of the last ice age -- and what lies beneath them -- have been discovered by Cornell University researchers using a special type of radar in a novel way.
What's the story, morning glory? Taxonomy, evolution and sweet potatoes
Scientists at the University of Oxford reveal that the sweet potato and its storage root originated at least 2 million years ago -- that is, not only before agriculture but also long before modern humans appeared on Earth.
Injectable, flexible electrode could replace rigid nerve-stimulating implants
By electrically stimulating nerves, neuromodulation therapies can reduce epileptic seizures, soothe chronic pain, and treat depression and a host of other health conditions without the use of conventional drugs like opioids.
Ethnic minority women face more barriers to seeing their GP
Women from ethnic minority backgrounds report around twice as many barriers than white women to seeking help for potential cancer symptoms, according to new research funded by Cancer Research UK.
Newborn baby hiccups could be key to brain development
Each time a newborn baby hiccups, it triggers a large wave of brain signals which could help the baby learn how to regulate their breathing, finds a new UCL-led study published in Clinical Neurophysiology.
Humans' ability to read dogs' facial expressions is learned, not innate
In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, a team of researchers from Germany and the United Kingdom assessed how experience with dogs affects humans' ability to recognize dog emotions.
Degradable plastic by DMDO: 'Unnecessary' component key
Associate Professor Yasuhiro Kohsaka of the Research Initiative for Supra-Materials (RISM) and 3 students at the Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University succeeded in developing a degradable plastic.
Nusinersen improves motor function in adults with spinal muscular atrophy
A study published in the Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases presents the first evidence of mild improvement or stabilization of motor and respiratory function in adults with spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (SMA3) treated with Nusinersen, which was the case even in patients who have had the disease for 20 years or more.
New vaccine protects from widespread, costly infection, mice study shows
A newly developed experimental vaccine was more than eighty percent effective in protecting mice from succumbing to Staphylococcus aureus infection.
Team plucks needle from genomic haystack, finding essential transcription factor binding sites
Using CRISPR/Cas9 knockout screens, a multi-institutional research team systematically interrogated the essentiality of more than 10,000 forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) and CTCF binding sites in breast and prostate cancer cells, finding that essential FOXA1 binding sites act as enhancers to orchestrate the expression of nearby essential genes.
Degenerative eye condition (AMD) to affect 77 million Europeans by 2050
The leading cause of irreversible blindness and severely impaired eyesight -- age-related macular degeneration, or AMD for short- - is expected to affect 77 million Europeans by 2050, reveal the latest calculations, published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.
Opioid-related cardiac arrest patients differ from other cardiac arrests
People who suffer cardiac arrest due to an opioid overdose are younger, have fewer chronic medical conditions and may be more likely to be to receive bystander CPR, according to a review of emergency response records in Maine.
How meditation can help you make fewer mistakes
New research tested how open monitoring meditation altered brain activity in a way that suggests increased error recognition.
Biomarker blood test could reveal high risk heart patients in need of treatment
Preventive cardiology researchers at UT Southwestern believe that a new blood test for protein biomarkers could identify early stage heart disease in people.
Finding common ground for scientists and policymakers on soil carbon and climate change
In an opinion published in Nature Sustainability, a group of scientists argue that public debate about the role of soil carbon in battling climate change is undermining the potential for policymakers to implement policies that build soil carbon for other environmental and agricultural benefits.
Magnets for the second dimension
ETH Zurich scientists have developed cube-shaped magnetic building blocks that can be assembled into two-dimensional shapes and controlled by an external magnetic field.
Researchers find nature's backup plan for converting nitrogen into plant nutrients
Princeton University researchers have found that nature has developed a backup method for converting atmospheric nitrogen into the nutrient form critical to plant growth and soil fertility.
Evening eating linked to poorer heart health for women
Women who consumed a higher proportion of their daily intake of calories later in the evening were more likely to be at greater risk for cardiovascular disease than women who did not.
Antibiotics: New substances break bacterial resistance
Researchers at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new, promising class of active ingredients against resistant bacteria.
Gold mining critically impairs water quality in rivers across Peruvian biodiversity hotspot
A Dartmouth study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that artisanal-scale gold mining is altering water clarity and dynamics in the Madre de Dios River watershed in Peru, a tropical biodiversity hotspot.
Research brief: Retinal imaging technology for early detection of Alzheimer's disease
Research update from the University of Minnesota Center for Drug Design on an early detection device for Alzheimer's disease.
Prey-size plastics are invading larval fish nurseries
A new study by researchers at Arizona State University's Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (GDCS) and NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center has revealed that larval fish species from various ocean habitats are now being threatened by plastic pollution that infects their nursery habitats---at levels on average, eight times higher than those recently found in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.
Legal risk of not performing CPR higher than providing lifesaving assistance
While some bystanders may fail to attempt CPR because they fear legal liability, the likelihood of facing litigation is higher for delaying or failing to intervene, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019 -- Nov.
Study: E-cigarettes may be more harmful to heart health than tobacco
A new study from researchers at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that electronic nicotine delivery systems, including devices such as e-cigarettes, may be just as harmful to the heart, if not more, than traditional cigarettes.
Cholesterol levels in American adults declining since 2013 guideline release
The implementation of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol has led to improved overall cholesterol levels for American adults, especially those on cholesterol lowering medications, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the impact of the highly anticipated guideline several years after release.
Common anti-inflammatory may increase risk of diabetes
A commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory may increase the risk of diabetes after just one week of treatment, according to new findings presented at The Society for Endocrinology Annual Conference.
New insights into cause and treatments for aggressive form of breast cancer
Potential environmental risk factors and new targets for treating an aggressive form of breast cancer have been identified, according to new data presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Brighton.
An exception to the rule: An intact sense of smell without a crucial olfactory brain structure
A handful of left-handed women have excellent senses of smell, despite lacking olfactory bulbs.
The gut may be the ticket to reducing chemo's side effects
In a new study, scientists observed several simultaneous reactions in mice given a common chemotherapy drug: Their gut bacteria and tissue changed, their blood and brains showed signs of inflammation, and their behaviors suggested they were fatigued and cognitively impaired.
Racial bias and discrimination may negatively impact heart disease care, risk factors
Two new studies illustrate that race may affect heart care for African Americans and African immigrants.
For the first time: A method for measuring animal personality
A study on mice shows animal research may need to take into account the connection between genes, behavior and personality.
What do we know about the gut microbiota in Parkinson's disease?
Since the discovery that the gut microbiome may play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), this fresh scientific approach has produced varying results.
ACP issues policy recommendations aimed at mitigating the rising costs of prescription drugs
In two new policy papers, the American College of Physicians (ACP) calls for changes aimed at mitigating the rising cost of prescription drugs.
Earliest evidence of insect-angiosperm pollination found in Cretaceous Burmese amber
Most of our food is from angiosperms, while more than 90% of angiosperms require insect pollination - making this pollination method hugely important.
Understanding how strains of flesh-eating bacteria interact may be key to treatment
A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston performed in collaboration with the University of Maryland at College Park investigated the dynamics among these strains, which may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions.
Scientists find eternal Nile to be more ancient than previously thought
The Nile's unchanging path has been a geologic mystery because long-lived rivers usually move over time.
Citizen responder CPR and defibrillation programs may improve survival and outcomes from cardiac arrests that occur at home
Implementing citizen responder programs to answer calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests may increase bystander defibrillation in private homes, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019 -- Nov.
Studies explore potential benefits and costs of increased treatment to achieve lower blood pressure
This news release contains updated and new data not in abstract MDP234.
Men who receive home care from spouse more likely to feel burdensome than women
A spouse requiring caregiving for chronic illness or a disability can create a stressful environment for married couples.
Heart-healthy lifestyle and nutrition during pregnancy helps kids develop healthy hearts
Good cardiovascular health during pregnancy -- a composite of optimal blood pressure, body mass index, blood sugar level, total cholesterol and not smoking -- increases the chance of having a child with good cardiovascular health at ages 10-14.
Hurricanes have become bigger and more destructive for USA; new study from the Niels Bohr Institute
A new study by researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Aslak Grinsted, Peter Ditlevsen and Jens Hesselbjerg shows that hurricanes have become more destructive since 1900, and the worst of them are more than 3 times as frequent now than 100 years ago.
Study: Where one lives influences post-op care and rehab after hip replacement surgery
A study finds that the socioeconomic status of one's community influences where a patient receives postoperative care and rehabilitation after elective hip replacement surgery.
Youth with abnormal heart rhythms more likely to have ADHD, anxiety, depression
Children and adolescents with abnormal heart rhythms are more likely to have ADHD, anxiety and depression compared to their counterparts with either other select chronic childhood illnesses or no chronic medical conditions, according to new research.
Middle-aged muscle mass linked to future heart disease risk
The amount of lean muscle a healthy person has in middle age is linked to their future risk of heart disease, suggests research in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
Vitamin B12 deficiency linked to obesity during pregnancy
Vitamin B12 deficiency impairs fat metabolism and may be associated with obesity during pregnancy, according to findings presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference.
Strong link found between level of depression and heart disease, stroke
There is a strong link between the level of a person's depression and their odds of having heart disease or stroke, according to new research.
Penn uncovers dose of medication more likely to put patients with pemphigus into remission
Researchers from Penn compare a lymphoma-dose regimen of rituximab to a rheumatoid arthritis regimen for the treatment of pemphigus.
Successful collaboration of community -- and state-based heart disease prevention programs focused on
A collaborative of community -- and state-based heart disease prevention programs helped states achieve major goals for eliminating health disparities, according to new research.
Quitting Facebook could boost exam results
In research that validates what many parents and educators suspect, students whose grades are below average could boost their exam results if they devoted less time to Facebook and other social networking sites.
Too much sugar doesn't put the brakes on turbocharged crops
Plants make sugars to form leaves to grow and produce grains and fruits through the process of photosynthesis, but sugar accumulation can also slow down photosynthesis.
Gimme shelter: Seven new leech species call freshwater mussels home
The frequent presence of leeches with a hidden lifestyle in the mantle cavity of freshwater mussels has been recorded since the second half of the 19th century.
Rising grain prices in response to phased climatic change during 1736-1850 in the North China Plain
The links between climatic change and grain price anomalies in the North China Plain (NCP) during the Qing Dynasty were analyzed.
Forecasting dengue: Challenges and a way forward
International collaboration is finding new ways to improve how scientists develop and test models to forecast dengue infection.
New particle analysis technique paves way for better air pollution monitoring
A new technique for continuously monitoring both the size and optical properties of individual airborne particles could offer a better way to monitor air pollution.
New catalyst efficiently produces hydrogen from seawater
Seawater is one of the most abundant resources on earth, offering promise both as a source of hydrogen and of drinking water in arid climates.
Too much ultra-processed foods linked to lower heart health
Americans get more than 50% of their daily calories from ultra-processed foods.
New findings on nitrous oxide emissions from northern trees surprised scientists
A recently published study, completed by researchers from the University of Helsinki together with Dr Katerina Machacova, a visiting scholar, demonstrates that boreal forests of the Northern Hemisphere are sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O).
Use of locum doctors rising despite limited evidence on quality and safety
There is little hard evidence to support the widely held perception that locum doctors present a greater risk of causing harm to patients, according to new research published by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.
Weight-reduction surgery may prevent strokes, lengthen lives
Obese people who undergo weight-reduction surgery live longer than obese people who do not have surgery, according to new research.
Scientists explain the origin of brain mapping diversity for eye dominance
In a recent study that will be published in the Journal of Neuroscience on November 14th, researchers found evidence that ocular dominance patterns are diverse because the amount of cortex available to represent each binocular point varies greatly across species and individual animals of the same species.
The pathway to Parkinson's takes a surprising twist
A new study finds that neurons affected in Parkinson's disease can shut down without fully dying, allowing them to also switch off neighboring cells.
Evolutionary diversity is associated with Amazon forest productivity
An international team of researchers have revealed for the first time that Amazon forests with the greatest evolutionary diversity are the most productive.
NIH funding for cardiac arrest research low compared to funding for other leading causes of death, disability
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) invests less money in cardiac arrest research compared to other leading causes of death and disability in the United States, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019 -- Nov.
Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand
Handheld electrochemical sensors have become part of the daily routine for millions of people who monitor their diabetes at home using inexpensive glucometers, but such technology has been difficult to adapt to other biomolecules.
Social support may reduce heart, stroke effects of discrimination in transgender and gender conforming
Having strong social support may help offset heart and stroke risk factors caused by discrimination in transgender and gender non-conforming adults, according to new research.
To live longer after a heart attack, keep moving
Men who regularly walk at least 30 minutes a day after having a heart attack live longer than those who don't stay as active, according to a new study.
Lasting tumor regression of leukemia and lymphoma in mouse models achieved by U-M compound
For decades, a transcription factor known as STAT3 has been a major therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer, but it has largely been considered 'undruggable' due to the difficulty of developing compounds to effectively inhibit its activity.
Life-threatening lung inflammation linked to vaping in 16-year-old
The fluid in e-cigarettes may cause a potentially life threatening lung inflammation in those who are susceptible, warn doctors in the Archives of Disease in Childhood after treating a teenage boy with respiratory failure linked to vaping.
Artificial Intelligence examining ECGs predicts irregular heartbeat, death risk
Scientists trained a computer (a neural network or artificial intelligence) to evaluate electrocardiograms (ECGs) to predict which patients are likely to develop an irregular heartbeat -- even when doctors interpreted the test results as normal.
LSU Health research discovers potential new Rx target for AMD and Alzheimer's
Research led by Nicolas Bazan, M.D., Ph.D., Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, found a new mechanism by which a class of molecules his lab discovered may protect brain and retinal cells against neurodegenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration and Alzheimer's.
Lower IQ, family history tied to treatment-resistant schizophrenia
Those with a family history of schizophrenia and men with lower IQ are more likely to struggle with treatment resistant schizophrenia than others with the mental disorder, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.
Specific jobs linked to poor heart health for women
A large study of postmenopausal women found that certain jobs, including several in health care, were linked to poor heart health for women.
New efficiency world record for organic solar modules
Researchers from Nuremberg and Erlangen has set a new record for the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic modules.
New understanding of antibiotic synthesis
Researchers at McGill University's Faculty of Medicine have made important strides in understanding the functioning of enzymes that play an integral role in the production of antibiotics and other therapeutics.
Aging in good health: The inequalities are widening
Life expectancy in Switzerland has been growing steadily for decades.
Wearable tracker study links insufficient sleep to biological aging and cardiovascular disease risk
Getting a good night's sleep is important and insufficient sleep has been linked to poor health in many studies.
Each mouse is different
Max Planck scientists map mouse personality.
Early menopause may raise the risk of several heart conditions
Women experiencing early menopause (before age 40) are at higher risk for several heart conditions, according to new research.
Hot town, springtime in the city: Urbanization delays spring plant growth in warm regions
The first appearance of bright green leaves heralds the start of spring.
DNA is only one among millions of possible genetic molecules
Biology encodes information in DNA and RNA, complex molecules finely tuned to their functions.
Drug discount cards could actually cost patients more
New research published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) reveals that brand-name drug discount cards are leading to higher health care spending in Canada -- increased costs that are ultimately passed on to patients.
Mosquito nets: Are they catching more fishes than insects?
Mosquito nets designed to prevent malaria transmission are used for fishing which may devastate tropical coastal ecosystems, according to a new scientific study.
New research explains how HIV avoids getting ZAPped
Humans have evolved dynamic defense mechanisms against the viruses that seek to infect our bodies -- proteins that specialize in identifying, capturing and destroying the genetic material that viruses try to sneak into our cells.
Putting a conservation finger on the internet's pulse
Social media is a rich vein of data for researchers to discover important trends in human environmental behaviour.
Psychological stress may increase risk for a serious cardiovascular event in women with heart disease
The way women with heart disease respond to psychological stress may increase their risk for a major cardiovascular event.
Combining satellites, radar provides path for better forecasts
Every minute counts when it comes to predicting severe weather.
Non-volatile control of magnetic anisotropy through change of electric polarization
Researchers at Kanazawa University controlled the magnetic properties of a metal layer through the electrical polarization of a neighboring metal oxide layer.
Found: Miniature fanged 'deer' rediscovered tiptoeing through Vietnam's coastal forests
Global Wildlife Conservation and partners Southern Institute of Ecology and Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research have rediscovered a species lost to science since 1990 called a silver-backed chevrotain -- a deer-like species that is the size of a rabbit, has a silver sheen, and has been hanging on in a region of Vietnam ravaged by poaching by snares.
Stress testing the healthcare system
Austrian scientists can for the first time determine the resilience of the health care system in a region.
New fossil pushes back physical evidence of insect pollination to 99 million years ago
A study co-led by researchers at Indiana University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has pushed back the first-known physical evidence of insect flower pollination to 99 million years ago, during the mid-Cretaceous period.
Large scale integrated circuits produced in printing press
Researchers at Linköping University and RISE, Campus Norrköping, have shown for the first time that it is possible to print complete integrated circuits with more than 100 organic electrochemical transistors.
Using mountains for long-term energy storage
The storage of energy for long periods of time is subject to special challenges.
Brand drug discount cards increase private insurer costs by 46%
Discount cards for brand-name drugs provided to patients increased private insurer costs by 46% and varied in their impact on out-of-pocket payments by patients, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
A cheaper way to scale up atomic layer deposition
Chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a new method for atomic layer deposition, a technique commonly used in high-quality microelectronics.
Wide-ranging gender disparities remain in pediatrics
Three commonly argued justifications for the persistent discrimination and gender bias that prevent women from rising to leadership positions in the field of pediatric medicine have been debunked by a Drexel University College of Medicine researcher and colleagues in a special article published in the November 2019 issue of the journal Pediatrics.
Fetal nicotine exposure harms breathing in infants
Exposure to nicotine during development inhibits the function of neurons controlling the tongue, according to research in newborn rats recently published in eNeuro.
HSS experts share best practices for developing and implementing educational programs
At the 2019 ACR annual meeting in Atlanta, experts from the HSS Education Institute at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) presented their method for developing and implementing effective educational programs for diverse patients with rheumatic conditions.
New way of measuring white blood cell function offers better insights to help patients with sepsis
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with colleagues at MIT, have developed a technology advance to enable measurement of the activation and function of white blood cells -- the immune system's sentinels -- from a small aliquot of blood from patients with sepsis.
Australia unprepared to move future Alzheimer's treatment into rapid clinical use
Much work has been done to try to find a treatment that can delay or prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease, but less attention has been paid to whether health systems could move a breakthrough into rapid clinical use.
Scientists study impact of sediments and nutrients from Conowingo Dam on Chesapeake Bay
A new study examines the influences of a river dam on the fate of sediments and nutrients on an estuary, using the Conowingo Dam and the Chesapeake Bay as a case study.
Fingerprint test can distinguish between those who have taken or handled heroin
A state-of-the-art fingerprint detection technology can identify traces of heroin on human skin, even after someone has washed their hands -- and it is also smart enough to tell whether an individual has used the drug or shaken hands with someone who has handled it.
Late talkers twice as likely to have severe, frequent temper tantrums
Toddler speech delays and temper tantrums have long been assumed to be linked.
Salmonella -- how the body fights back
New research shows how our immune system fights back against Salmonella infection.
Study reveals how two strains of one bacterium combine to cause flesh-eating infection
A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences used genetic analysis to reveal how two different strains of a single species of flesh-eating bacteria worked in concert to become more dangerous than either one strain alone.
Infant home visiting program linked to less child abuse
Family Connects, a nurse home visiting program for newborns and their parents, is linked to substantial reductions in child maltreatment investigations in children's earliest years, according to new research from Duke University.
Project to answer last wishes spreads successfully
Six years ago the initial Three Wishes Project began at St.
First adult molars are 'living fossils' that hold a health record dating back to the womb
Researchers at McMaster University have found that a person's first permanent molars carry a life-long record of health information dating back to the womb, storing vital information that can connect maternal health to a child's health, even hundreds of years later.
Women with preeclampsia may be at greater risk for cardiac conditions later in life
Women who have gestational hypertension or preeclampsia in at least one pregnancy will have higher cardiovascular risk than women without such a history, and that this elevated risk persists at least into their 60s.
More than half of males with lupus report feeling depressed, receive little support
HSS launched a nationwide survey to assess the needs of males with lupus.
Study investigates a critical transition in water that remains liquid far below 0 °C
The theoretical model proposed by Brazilian researchers can be applied to any system in which two energy scales coexist.
Researchers highlight progress and challenges of phloem research
A new study by researchers from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) and their collaborators brings this knowledge together.

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