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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 12, 2019


Penn team discovers epigenetic pathway that controls social behavior in carpenter ants
Researchers discovered that a protein called CoRest, a neural repressor that is also found in humans, plays a central role in determining the social behavior of ants.
Last Arctic ice refuge is disappearing
The oldest and thickest Arctic sea ice is disappearing twice as fast as ice in the rest of the Arctic Ocean, according to new research.
Beware probiotics in ICU patients
A collaborative study published in Nature Medicine sounds a note of caution in using probiotics in the ICU.
New material points toward highly efficient solar cells
A new type of material for next-generation solar cells eliminates the need to use lead, which has been a major roadblock for this technology.
Cats of the sea offer insights into territorial behavior of wild fishes
Researchers carrying out regular monitoring of a Marine Protected Area off the UK coastline noticed species of wrasse demonstrating almost cat-like behaviour as they chased lasers shone onto the seabed.
Contraceptive drug shows promise for preventing and regressing cervical cancer
A new study in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, reports that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), the active ingredient in the common contraceptive injection Depo-Provera, was effective in preventing the development of cervical cancer in mice with precancerous lesions.
New spin directions in pyrite an encouraging sign for future spintronics
An Australian study revealing new spin textures in pyrite could unlock these materials' potential in future spintronics devices.
Nitrous oxide emissions set to rise in the Pacific Ocean
The acidification of the Pacific Ocean in northern Japan is increasing the natural production rate of N2O, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas.
Using sound waves to remotely target drugs to tumors
The lack of a clinically viable method to track and direct cancer drugs to tumors is a big problem for targeted therapeutics.
Finding out the factors that most influence the steel corrosion in reinforced concrete
This process causes structures to deteriorate internally and can even cause buildings to collapse.
Antimicrobial resistance poses significant risk to people, the economy
CCA expert panel study provides new data on potential impact of antimicrobial resistance in Canada.
Superconducting wind turbine chalks up first test success
A superconducting rotor has been successfully tested on an active wind turbine for the first time.
The thrust of the problem
For decades, scientists have debated the structure of the Main Himalayan Thrust -- the fault responsible for a 2015 earthquake that killed nearly 9,000 people, injured 22,000, and destroyed 600,000 homes in Gorkha, Nepal.
Gender quotas in business -- how do Europeans feel?
Despite years trying to bring more women to the top boards of business, the proportion of women on the committees of companies is tiny.
Hospitals given latitude to select transplant candidates don't prioritize sickest patients
Analysis of more than 29,000 adults listed on the national heart transplant registry from 2006 to 2015 shows how rules that give hospitals discretion in determining who gets a transplant result in large discrepancies in how sick patients are when they receive heart transplants at hospitals across the United States.
Delivering large genes to the retina is problematic
A new study has shown that a commonly used vector for large gene transfer can success-fully deliver genes to retinal cells in the laboratory, but when injected subretinally into rats it provokes a robust and acute inflammatory response.
Researchers find new way to target childhood cancer
An Australian-led international research effort has broken fresh ground in the race to find more effective treatments for the childhood cancer neuroblastoma, by uncovering a new and as-yet unexploited target in cancer cells that therapeutic drugs can be aimed at.
Maritime continent weakens Asian Tropical Monsoon rainfall through Australian cross-equatorial flows
A new study reveals how maritime continent weakens Asian tropical monsoon rainfall through Australian Cross-equatorial Flows.
Good noise, bad noise: White noise improves hearing
Noise is not the same as noise -- and even a quiet environment does not have the same effect as white noise.
New diagnostic criteria proposed for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
More than 100 of the nation's leading pulmonologists have proposed new criteria for diagnosing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
WPI researchers discover vulnerabilities affecting billions of computer chips
Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) security researchers Berk Sunar and Daniel Moghimi led an international team of researchers that discovered serious security vulnerabilities in computer chips made by Intel Corp. and STMicroelectronics.
Meal-detection technology brings 'artificial pancreas' one step closer to reality
A.I. researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a system that can detect when a person is eating and calculate how many carbohydrates they are consuming with unprecedented accuracy and speed.
New collection showcases cutting-edge techniques in insect morphology and systematics
In the last 20 years, the study of the form and function of insects has been revitalized by modern technologies and genetic research methods.
Does blue light therapy help acne? Efficacy and evidence is lacking
Conclusions about the effectiveness of blue light therapy for acne are limited.
Magnetic skin ensures the force is with you
A magnetic skin that is safe and comfortable to wear could open the door to a wide range of wireless, remotely controlled applications.
Why only some post-stroke survivors can 'copy what I say'
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and elsewhere report in Brain that the left lateral temporal cortex must be intact in stroke patients with aphasia if they are to have their speech entrained.
Cardiac resynchronization therapy benefits cancer survivors with heart failure
A pacemaker-like device restored heart function in a group of cancer survivors -- mostly women with breast cancer -- who had suffered from heart failure as a result of chemotherapy treatment, a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reports.
Knowledge of the origin of the food makes it taste better
Food we are familiar with tastes the best, but if we know where the food comes from and how it is made, it actually gets better, even if we don't think the taste is spot on.
Spray painting fiber bandages onto wounds
Researchers at Montana Technological University have developed a portable electrospinning device with a confined electric field that can safely deposit bandages and drugs directly onto biological surfaces, using air to spray the fibers out onto the surface, like a can of spray paint.
Perspectives and suggestions in caring for high-need, complex patients
High-need high-cost patients, many of whom are experiencing poverty, use a large portion of health care resources.
Listening to music while driving reduces cardiac stress
A study by Brazilian researchers suggests that cardiac overload due to the stress of driving in heavy traffic can be attenuated by listening to instrumental music.
Army researcher promotes cooperation between humans, autonomous machines
The trust between humans and autonomous machines is a top priority for Army researchers -- as machines become integral to society, it is critical to understand the impact on human decision-making.
The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology publish new joint 2019 Clinical Performance and Quality Measures for Adults with High Blood Pressure
Outlines 22, 2019 new measures for the diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure (HBP), including 6 performance measures, 6 process quality measures and 10 structural quality measures.
New exploration method for geothermal energy
Where to drill? This is the basic question in the exploration of underground energy resources, such as geothermal energy.
Getting cancer drugs to the brain is difficult -- but a new 'road map' might make it easie
Purdue University scientists have provided the first comprehensive characterization of both the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers in brain metastases of lung cancer, which will serve as a road map for treatment development.
Half of Piedmont drinking wells may exceed NC's hexavalent chromium standards
A new study which combines measurements from nearly 1,400 drinking water wells across North Carolina estimates that more than half of the wells in the state's Piedmont region contain levels of cancer-causing hexavalent chromium in excess of state safety standards.
University of Florida scientists advance citrus greening research efforts
To facilitate the scientific community's ability to use L. crescens in citrus greening research, University of Florida Department of Plant Pathology scientists have published an article in Phytopathology that outlines, step-by-step, highly reproducible and detailed protocols that they have standardized for culturing L. crescens.
Boosting host immune defenses to treat tuberculosis
A study in iScience suggests a new approach that might help treat Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis: making people's cells better at killing Mtb by harnessing RNA sensors in our cells, which detect the RNA of invading pathogens.
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades.
Stalled weather patterns will get bigger due to climate change
Climate change will increase the size of stalled high-pressure systems that can cause heat waves, droughts and other extreme weather, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.
Vaccine reduces likelihood of severe pneumonia
A new study has found severe pneumonia decreases by 35 per cent in children who receive a vaccine against a pneumonia-causing bacteria.
A fast and precise look into fiber-reinforced composites
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have improved a method for small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to such an extent that it can now be used in the development or quality control of novel fiber-reinforced composites.
Harvard study shows where global renewable energy investments have greatest benefits
New study finds that the amount of climate and health benefits achieved from renewable energy depends on the country where it is installed.
Scientists identify immune cells linked to malaria-induced anaemia through autoantibody production
An autoimmune attack on uninfected red blood cells likely contributes to anaemia -- a shortage of red blood cells -- in people with malaria, according to a new study published in eLife.
Cells control their dance of death
La Trobe University researchers have revealed for the first time how white blood cells control the final moments of their death, helping their own removal from the human body.
What future do emperor penguins face?
Emperor penguins establish their colonies on sea ice under extremely specific conditions.
Program linking patients to community resources shows no significant impact on well-being
A social prescribing initiative, designed to improve patients' well-being and quality of life by connecting them to non-medical resources, did not prove effective overall.
With Mars methane mystery unsolved, curiosity serves scientists a new one: Oxygen
For the first time in the history of space exploration, scientists have measured the seasonal changes in the gases that fill the air directly above the surface of Gale Crater on Mars.
Severity of earthquake impact may change with the seasons, study shows
The devastating impact caused by earthquakes on the local communities and environment could differ in severity depending on the season a pioneering new study on two historic earthquakes in Kazakhstan has suggested.
Innovations in treatment of traumatic injuries with severe bleeding are saving lives
Deaths from severe bleeding after major trauma have been reduced by 40% over the last decade through a programme of research and innovation led by Queen Mary University of London, Barts Health NHS Trust and NHS Blood and Transplant.
Etalumis 'reverses' simulations to reveal new science
A multinational collaboration using computing resources at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center has developed the first probabilistic programming framework capable of controlling existing simulators and running at large-scale on HPC platforms.
Larger than life: Augmented ants
The first app of its kind allows users to interact with biodiversity research through augmented reality.
Using cardiac-specific biomarkers to predict cardiovascular disease risk early
A new review article provides valuable insights into how traditional and emerging cardiac-specific biomarkers and their associated cardiovascular disease risk factors may help point to effective preventive interventions in high-risk obese populations starting at an early stage of disease development.
Capacity to address patient social needs affects primary care clinician burnout
Clinicians noted the importance of social needs interventions being timely, accessible and tailored to each individual patient, while being responsive to patient feedback.
Deep neural networks speed up weather and climate models
A team of environmental and computation scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are collaborating to use deep neural networks, a type of machine learning, to replace the parameterizations of certain physical schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model, an extremely comprehensive model that simulates the evolution of many aspects of the physical world around us.
How artificial intelligence can transform psychiatry
Scientists have developed a new mobile app that categorizes mental health status based on speech patterns.
Trauma and kids: The role of the early childhood teacher
New research from the University of South Australia, has explored the growing uncertainty faced by children aged 0-8 years in disaster zones, such as bushfires, finding that early childhood teachers hold a vital role in supporting children dealing with trauma.
Some hoppy news: Hops don't need to go dormant in order to flower
In a study that wraps up three years and 13 growth cycles of several popular hop varieties, CSU's Bill Bauerle is upending conventional wisdom hop growers have followed for decades to coax their plants to flower.
Depression linked to nutrition in middle-aged and older Canadians
Your diet can put you at risk of depression, according to a new study.
At the heart of regeneration: Scientists reveal a new frontier in cardiac research
Researchers at CHLA uncover mechanisms in zebrafish heart regeneration that could lead to better treatments for babies in need of heart repair.
New SLAS Technology auto-commentary released
November's SLAS Technology Auto-Commentary, ''On the Way to Efficient Analytical Measurements: The Future of Robot-Based Measurements,'' highlights potentially suitable replacement measurement systems and processes as outlined in the book, Automation Solutions for Analytical Measurements: Concepts and Applications.
Drug dust
Researchers at Harvard University and the Drug Enforcement Administration have designed a promising new tool that can identify smaller concentrations of drug powders than any other device.
Low-cost, portable system takes OCT beyond ophthalmology
Researchers have developed a way to perform optical coherence tomography (OCT) in hard-to-reach areas of the body such as joints.
ICU survivors commonly experience job loss after critical illness, study confirms
National attention has been drawn to the plight of patients who have experienced the unintended side effects of prolonged ICU care such as memory loss and muscle weakness.
At future Mars landing spot, scientists spy mineral that could preserve signs of past life
Using orbital instruments to peer into Jezero crater, the landing site for NASA's Mars 2020 rover, researchers found deposits of hydrated silica, a mineral that's great at preserving microfossils and other signs of life.
Flame-retardant exposure increases anxiety, affects social behaviors in prairie vole
New research shows that early life exposure to a commonly used flame-retardant mixture increases anxiety and affects socioemotional behaviors in prairie voles, particularly in females.
Microplastics found in oysters, clams on Oregon coast, PSU study finds
Tiny threads of plastics are showing up in Pacific oysters and razor clams along the Oregon coast -- and the yoga pants, fleece jackets, and sweat-wicking clothing that Pacific Northwesterners love to wear are a source of that pollution, according to a new Portland State University study.
WSU study shows insulin can increase mosquitoes' immunity to West Nile virus
A discovery by a Washington State University-led research team has the potential to inhibit the spread of West Nile virus as well as Zika and dengue viruses.
Contacts with primary care physicians did not increase after the Affordable Care Act
At the same time the Affordable Care Act increased the number of insured Americans, analysis of health care industry data shows a continued decline in contact with primary care physician services.
Young male cancer survivors may benefit from testosterone replacement
In young male cancer survivors with low testosterone levels, testosterone replacement therapy is associated with an improvement in body composition, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Richard Ross of University of Sheffield, UK, and colleagues.
Wildlife in Catalonia carry bacteria resistant to antimicrobials used in human health
A study performed in Catalonia by IRTA-CReSA, UAB and Torreferrussa Wildlife Center demonstrates that the enteric bacteria of wildlife origin in Catalonia exhibits a high prevalence and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes.
Practice characteristics and job satisfaction among GPs in 11 countries
Organizational and functional features of general practitioner practices in 11 countries were studied in search of underlying reasons for job dissatisfaction.
Defining a new approach to treating Parkinson's disease
Scientists from the University of Cologne have contributed to identifying Cav2.3 as a new target for a promising specific therapy.
New research shows the more women on a company's board, the more market value is lost
A company with a gender-diverse board of directors is interpreted as revealing a preference for diversity and a weaker commitment to shareholder value, according to new research in the INFORMS journal Organization Science.
Deep learning assists in detecting malignant lung cancers
Radiologists assisted by deep-learning based software were better able to detect malignant lung cancers on chest X-rays, according to new researched.
Bacteria may contribute more to climate change as planet heats up
As bacteria adapt to hotter temperatures, they speed up their respiration rate and release more carbon, potentially accelerating climate change.
Individual climate models may not provide the complete picture
Equilibrium climate sensitivity -- how sensitive the Earth's climate is to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide -- may be underestimated in individual climate models, according to a team of climate scientists.
First evidence of feathered polar dinosaurs found in Australia
A cache of 118 million-year-old fossilized dinosaur and bird feathers has been recovered from an ancient lake deposit that once lay beyond the southern polar circle.
New research suggests robots appear more persuasive when pretending to be human
Recent technological breakthroughs in artificial intelligence have made it possible for machines, or bots, to pass as humans.
Complementary and alternative therapies to treat colic
A review of the evidence on the use of complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies to treat babies with colic has shown some that some treatments -- including probiotics, fennel extract and spinal manipulation -- do appear to help, but that overall the evidence on the use of these therapies is limited so should be treated with caution.
Research points to possible target to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or IPF
In a study of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or IPF, recruited monocyte-derived macrophages with increased flux in their mevalonate pathway were able induce lung fibrosis in a mouse model without prior lung injury.
Engineers help with water under the bridge and other tough environmental decisions
From energy to water to food, civil engineering projects greatly impact natural resources.
A national decline in primary care visits associated with more comprehensive visits and electronic follow-up
The number of primary care visits may be declining nationally, but analysis reveals that in-person visits have become more comprehensive and follow-up care has moved online.
Magnetic tuning at the nanoscale
Physicists from the German research center Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) are working to produce engineered magnetic nanostructures and to tailor material properties at the nanoscale.
Higher education holds key to more age-friendly society, publication says
The age-friendly movement is an ideal means of embracing demographic shifts in higher education and society at large, according to the latest issue in the What's Hot newsletter series from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), titled 'Higher Education and Aging: The Age-Friendly Movement -- Building a Case for Age Inclusivity.' Support for the publication was provided by AARP.
New chip for waking up small wireless devices could extend battery life
A new power saving chip could significantly reduce or eliminate the need to replace batteries in Internet of Things (IoT) devices and wearables.
A milestone in ultrashort-pulse laser oscillators
With the demonstration of a sub-picosecond thin-disk laser oscillator delivering a record-high 350-W average output power, physicists at ETH Zurich set a new benchmark and pave the path towards even more powerful lasers.
AI-driven single blood cell classification
For the first time, researchers from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University Hospital of LMU Munich show that deep learning algorithms perform similar to human experts when classifying blood samples from patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
New Pitt research finds carbon nanotubes show a love/hate relationship with water
New research in the journal Carbon reveals that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a coating can both repel and hold water in place, a useful property for applications like printing, spectroscopy, water transport, or harvesting surfaces.
Satellite and reanalysis data can substitute field observations over Asian water tower
Satellite data sets are found reliable to reproduce the total column water vapor characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau.
Epigenetic switch found that turns warrior ants into forager ants
In 2016, researchers observed that they could reprogram the behavior of the Florida carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus.
SMAD2 and SMAD3, two almost identical transcription factors but with distinct roles
Both transcription factors regulate the expression of genes involved in embryo development, among other functions, although they exert very different roles.
What leads citizens to vote for 'anti-establishment' parties?
An article by Danilo Serani, a researcher with the Department of Political and Social Sciences at UPF, analyses the impact of the economic crisis on the electoral preferences of European citizens.
Protein could offer therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer
A protein that drives growth of pancreatic cancer, and which could be a target for new treatments, has been identified by researchers at the Crick.
UTSA researchers discover new pathways in brain's amygdala
The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) researchers are pioneering an innovative brain study that sheds light on how the amygdala portion of the brain functions and could contribute to a better understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression and Alzheimer's disease.
Mothers' pregnancy-related anxiety may alter how infants' brains respond to sad speech
Study shows correlation between mothers' self-reported pregnancy-related anxiety, and babies' blood flow to brain areas responsible for emotional responses when listening to sad speech
Carbon dots make calcium easier to track
Prof. DONG Wenfei's research group from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology (SIBET) has developed a new type of fluorescent carbon dot that can effectively detect calcium levels in cells.
Researchers develop a new home-based app to better monitor Parkinson's disease
In order to optimally treat motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), it is necessary to have a good understanding of their severity and daily fluctuations.
This is what the monsoon might look like in a warmer world
In the last interglacial period on Earth about 125,000 years ago, the Indian monsoon was longer, more extreme and less reliable than it is today.
An additional component can triple vaccine efficiency, and scientists explained how
A team of Russian scientists carried out a study on the cell immunity level and found out how an adjuvant called azoximer bromide increases the immunogenicity of the anti-flu vaccine.
Iron-based solar cells on track to becoming more efficient
An international study led from Lund University in Sweden shows that 30% of the energy in a certain type of light-absorbing iron molecule disappears in a previously unknown manner.
Is virtual reality the next big thing in art therapy?
Researchers from Drexel University's College of Nursing and Health Professions in the Creative Arts Therapies Department conducted a study to see if virtual reality can be used as an expressive tool in art therapy.
Study reveals breach of 'dancing' barrier governs crystal growth
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago used computer-based simulations to analyze how atoms and molecules move in a solution and identified a general mechanism governing crystal growth that scientists can manipulate when developing new materials.
Drexel's MXene materials help photodetectors see the light
Using a special type of two-dimensional material, researchers at Drexel University have developed a new way to make light sensors that improves their sensitivity and could allow manufacturers to keep up with the growing demand for their use in devices ranging from television remotes to fiber optic receivers in data centers, and light detecting and ranging systems (LiDAR) in autonomous vehicles.
Anthrax may be the next tool in the fight against bladder cancer
Researchers at Purdue University have come up with a way to combine the anthrax toxin with a growth factor to kill bladder cancer cells and tumors.
Deep learning expands study of nuclear waste remediation
A research collaboration between Berkeley Lab, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Brown University, and NVIDIA has achieved exaflop performance with a deep learning application used to model subsurface flow in the study of nuclear waste remediation.
NASA finds heavy rain in Tropical Storm Fengshen
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring within the newly developed Tropical Storm Fengshen.
Ant expert discovers newly emergent species in his backyard
Jack Longino is a global ant expert and has traveled the world documenting and discovering ant species.
Scientists crack rabies virus weaponry
Researchers from Monash University and the University of Melbourne have found a way to stop the rabies virus shutting down the body's immune defence against it.
Study reveals 'bug wars' that take place in cystic fibrosis
Scientists have revealed how common respiratory bugs that cause serious infections in people with cystic fibrosis interact together, according to a new study in eLife.
Massive photons in an artificial magnetic field
An international research collaboration from Poland, the UK and Russia has created a two-dimensional system -- a thin optical cavity filled with liquid crystal -- in which they trapped photons.
7T MRI offers new insights into multiple sclerosis
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have completed a new study using 7 Tesla (7T) MRI -- a far more powerful imaging technology -- to further examine LME in MS patients
Preterm children have similar temperament to children who were institutionally deprived
A child's temperament is affected by the early stages of their life.
Whale shark hot spot offers new conservation insights
An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the USA, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency in the Red Sea, offering insights for conservation.
Chronic adversity dampens dopamine production
People exposed to a lifetime of psychosocial adversity may have an impaired ability to produce the dopamine levels needed for coping with acutely stressful situations.
Prosthetic joint infections missed in patients with rheumatic diseases
Standard diagnostic methods are not adequate to identify prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) in patients with rheumatic diseases, according to findings from a new study by researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City.
A runaway star ejected from the galactic heart of darkness
Astronomers have spotted an ultrafast star, traveling at a blistering 6 million km/h, that was ejected by the supermassive black hole at the heart at the Milky Way five million years ago.
Ancient rain gauge: New evidence links groundwater, climate changes in deep time
Changes in groundwater millions of years ago created alternating layers of vivid yellow and brown in the mineral sphalerite, and those variations align with movements in Earth's orbit that impacted climate in the deep past, Penn State scientists found.
More Americans struggle to fall asleep, stay asleep
If you have trouble sleeping, you're not alone. New research from Iowa State University finds more Americans have trouble falling asleep and staying asleep.
Scientists shed new light on neural processes behind learning and motor behaviours
Researchers have provided new insight into the neural processes behind movement and learning behaviours, according to a study published today in eLife.
Associations between burnout and practice organization in family physicians
With the rate of burnout as high as 63% among family physicians, it is important to identify risk factors for physician burnout.
Polygenic risk score improves psychosis risk prediction
A new study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found that that using a polygenic risk score (PRS) based on data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) improves psychosis risk prediction in persons meeting clinical high-risk criteria.
Researchers strengthen weakest link in manufacturing strong materials
Industrial and automotive machinery, such as automotive engine parts, contain materials that are, heat-, wear-, and corrosion-resistant.
Universal guideline for treating mucormycosis developed
'One World -- One Guideline': Researchers at the University of Cologne and Cologne University Hospital have launched an initiative to significantly reduce the mortality rate of the rare fungal disease mucormycosis, which afflicts 7,000 people worldwide every year.
Study: 'Pre-habilitation' by peer coaches before knee replacement may improve outcomes
HSS researchers launched a study to see if a 'pre-habilitation'' program - counseling by a peer coach who has already had knee replacement - could empower and inform patients scheduled for the surgery and lead to better outcomes.
Long-term blood pressure variation and risk of dementia
In a new research study published in the open access journal PLOS Medicine, Albert Hofman and colleagues at Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands and Harvard T.H.
Getting glued in the sea
New bio-inspired hydrogels can act like superglue in highly ionic environments such as seawater, overcoming issues in currently available marine adhesives.
Mount Sinai researcher's examine the metabolic effects of an oral blood cancer drug
Recent study found that an effective blood cancer treatment was associated with weight gain, obesity, and increased systolic blood pressure.
The environmental cost of cryptocurrency mines
Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin and Monero - the names of digital-based 'cryptocurrencies' are being heard more and more frequently.
Esports gamers face same level of psychological pressure as pro-athletes, study finds
Videogamers competing in major esports tournaments are under as much pressure and stress as professional athletes.
Forget the Chardonay, pass me the grape stems! Anti-tumor activity in prostate cancer cells
Grape stems are discarded en masse during the production of wine.
Small RNAs link immune system and brain cells
A collaborative study carried out by the Institute of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy at Goethe University (Professor Jochen Klein) and the Institute of Neurosciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Professor Hermona Soreq) shows sex-specific biases in disease-specific changes in brain cells, as well as in cellular control mechanisms based on endogenous short ribonucleic acid (RNA) chains.
Scientists explore Egyptian mummy bones with x-rays and infrared light
Experiments at Berkeley Lab are casting a new light on Egyptian soil and ancient mummified bone samples that could provide a richer understanding of daily life and environmental conditions thousands of years ago.
Rocky Mountain not-so high: Oil, gas wells drive down Colorado home values, reveals WVU research
Heather Stephens, assistant professor of resource economics and management at West Virginia University, found that shale development negatively impacts house prices, particularly for houses with private water and close proximity to the mountains.
Healthy mangroves help coral reef fisheries under climate stress
Healthy mangroves can help fight the consequences of climate change on coral reef fisheries, according to a University of Queensland-led study.

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