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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 13, 2019


Research to make (fun) multi-player gaming an educational experience
A new video game framework brings together two well-studied approaches to educational software in order to keep multiple players engrossed in the learning experience while fostering collaboration and problem solving.
New health insurance benefit at U-M led to increased rates of IVF
In a new research letter appearing in JAMA detailing a first-of-its-kind study, a University of Michigan team compared the use of IVF among university employees before and after the addition of an insurance coverage benefit, finding a marked increase in the rate of use.
Firefighters can ease one another's job stress, but loving spouses may increase it
Strong same-sex friendships among male firefighters can help cut down on their stress -- but loving relationships with their wives may increase anxiety for those who constantly face danger, according to a Baylor University study.
Multimaterial 3D printing manufactures complex objects, fast
3D printing is super cool, but it's also super slow -- it would take 115 days to print a detailed, multimaterial object about the size of a grapefruit.
Discovery: New biomarker for cancer stem cells
A University of Houston College of Pharmacy associate professor has discovered a new biomarker in cancer stem cells that govern cancer survival and spread, and it's raising hope that drug discovery to kill cancer stem cells could follow suit.
NASA's terra satellite sees fire and smoke from devastating bushfires in Australia
The state of New South Wales (NSW) in south eastern Australia is continuing to experience devastating bushfires due to the dry tinder-like atmosphere in the territory: high winds, dry lightning and continuing heat.
Can 'smart toilets' be the next health data wellspring?
Wearable, smart technologies are transforming the ability to monitor and improve health, but a decidedly low-tech commodity -- the humble toilet -- may have potential to outperform them all.
Sex workers' preferences for HIV prevention center on convenience
Preventing HIV in sex workers is a powerful tool in lowering the worldwide burden of the disease, and a new study could help ensure that high-risk women take advantage of medical safeguards.
Dartmouth study assesses fracture risk for patients taking multiple medications
There is a strong association between the number of fracture-associated drugs (FADs) older patients receive and their risk of sustaining a hip fracture, according to a new Dartmouth study.
Microparticles could help fight malnutrition
MIT researchers have now developed a new way to fortify staple foods with these micronutrients by encapsulating them in a biocompatible polymer that prevents the nutrients from being degraded during storage or cooking.
The effects of a mock shelter environment on sleep
Toyohashi University of Technology researchers conducted an experiment on the nature of sleep in an evacuation shelter environment.
Slowing the progression of multiple sclerosis
Over 77,000 Canadians are living with multiple sclerosis, a disease whose causes still remain unknown.
Black hole mergers: Cooking with gas
Gravitational wave detectors are finding black hole mergers in the universe at the rate of one per week.
Novel mathematical framework provides a deeper understanding of how drugs interact
Researchers at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences have developed a new methodology characterizing more precisely how drugs influence each other when combined during treatment.
No deliveries: How cells decide when to accept extracellular packages
Endocytosis, a fundamental process that cells use to take in macromolecules, functions a lot like an airlock on a spaceship -- but squishier, says Dr.
Taller people have increased risk for developing atrial fibrillation
Taller people have an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AFib), an irregular and often rapid heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, according to a new Penn Medicine study.
Artificial intelligence tool predicts life expectancy in heart failure patients
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, as well as a diverse team of cardiologists and physicists, developed a machine learning algorithm to predict the life expectancy in heart failure patients.
Opioid-based plant might not be best solution to curb habitual alcohol use
A Purdue University team published a paper in the British Journal of Pharmacology examining the effects of kratom and the potential impacts on people with alcohol use disorder.
Plants might be helping each other more than thought
Contrary to the long-held belief that plants in the natural world are always in competition, new research has found that in harsh environments mature plants help smaller ones -- and thrive as a result.
Chemistry -- Five-fold boost in formaldehyde yield
Environmentally benign methods for the industrial production of chemicals are urgently needed.
Climate impact of hydropower varies widely
Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true.
Few-cycle pulses break the 300 W barrier
A team led by researchers from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), Laser-Laboratorium Goettingen (LLG) and Active Fiber Systems (AFS) has generated multi-millijoule 3-cycle pulses at 318 W average power level.
Tuna carbon ratios reveal shift in food web
The ratio of carbon isotopes in three common species of tuna has changed substantially since 2000, suggesting major shifts are also taking place in the phytoplankton populations that form the basis of the ocean's food web, according to a new international study involving Duke University researchers.
Mayo Clinic study finds differences in how men and women perceive their own health
A Mayo Clinic study published in the American Journal of Health Behavior investigates differences in how men and women perceive their own health.
How giant kelp may respond to climate change
Like someone from Minnesota being dropped into an Arizona heat wave, giant kelp living in cooler, high-latitude waters were more vulnerable to excessive heat than kelp already living in warmer, Southern California waters, according to a study of Chilean and Californian kelp.
AI to determine when to intervene with your driving
Can your AI agent judge when to talk to you while you are driving?
Use changes after recreational marijuana legalization
How the legalization of recreational marijuana in some states was associated with changes in marijuana use and cannabis use disorder compared to other states from 2008 to 2016 was the focus of this study.
Precisely poking cells en masse to cure cancer
A novel microfluidic device addresses one of the most costly steps in the engineered cell therapy manufacturing process, namely gene delivery.
Experts unlock key to photosynthesis, a find that could help us meet food security demands
Scientists have solved the structure of one of the key components of photosynthesis, a discovery that could lead to photosynthesis being 'redesigned' to achieve higher yields and meet urgent food security needs.
Study teases out factors associated with postpartum overdose
A new study in the journal Addiction that uncovers several risk factors associated with postpartum opioid overdose.
A new approach to the hunt for dark matter
A study that takes a novel approach to the search for dark matter has been performed by the BASE Collaboration at CERN working together with a team at the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU).
After decades of little progress, researchers may be catching up to sepsis
After decades of little or no progress, biomedical researchers are finally making some headway at detecting and treating sepsis, a deadly medical complication that sends a surge of pathogenic infection through the body and remains a major public health problem.
Light at the end of the nanotunnel for future catalysts
Using a new type of nanoreactor, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in mapping catalytic reactions on individual metallic nanoparticles.
Early ID of prenatal exposure to opioids, gabapentin improves timely treatment of newborns
Timely identification of newborns exposed to both opioids and gabapentin during pregnancy could mean more appropriate care for newborns experiencing withdrawal.
Cholesterol, fat profiles at birth linked to psychological health at age 5
Babies born with high levels of bad cholesterol and a certain type of fat may face a heightened risk for social and psychological problems in childhood, according to new scientific findings.
High rates of vaccine-preventable infections in pediatric transplant patients
University of Colorado researchers have found lower vaccination rates among children who receive liver transplants, increasing the risk of sickness for those children, who already face significant health issues.
Urban development reduces flash flooding chances in arid West
Urban development in the eastern United States results in an increase in flash flooding in nearby streams, but in the arid West, urbanization has just the opposite effect, according to a Penn State researcher, who suggests there may be lessons to be learned from the sharp contrast.
AI for plant breeding in an ever-changing climate
Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Dan Jacobson is currently working on numerous projects that form an integrated roadmap for the future of AI in plant breeding and bioenergy.
Visualizing heat flow in bamboo could help design more energy-efficient and fire-safe buildings
Modified natural materials will be an essential component of a sustainable future, but first a detailed understanding of their properties is needed.
Protective microparticles shield and deliver micronutrients to people
A team of scientists has created a new microparticle-based platform that can preserve, protect and deliver micronutrients such as iron to rodents and human volunteers.
Baseline predictors of LDL-cholesterol and systolic blood pressure goal attainment after one year in the ISCHEMIA trial
In this analysis of 3,984 participants from ISCHEMIA (78% of 5,179 randomized) with available data, predictors of reaching one-year goals are reported for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP).
Mechanical signaling cascade central to fibrotic scar tissue development defined
In a new study published in Science Signaling, Cleveland Clinic researchers have identified a novel target for new therapies that may help to treat or prevent a host of fibrotic conditions, which contribute to nearly half of overall mortality in the United States.
Researchers create model to predict children likely to go into septic shock
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have developed a unique model allowing them to predict which children arriving in emergency departments are most likely to go into septic shock, a life-threatening condition.
Increased problematic use of marijuana in states where recreational cannabis is legal
Cannabis use disorder among adults and youth increased after legalization of recreational marijuana use, according to a new study from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and NYU School of Medicine.
Aging experts advocate global effort to ensure health spans match life spans
Across the world, more people are living longer. But 'whether the extra years will be good ones -- and whether societies and economies will benefit as a result -- depends on the actions we take now,' states an editorial in a new supplemental issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences from The Gerontological Society of America.
Early spinal patterns may predict scoliosis in teen years
A pediatric researcher has identified patterns of spinal curvature in younger children that may be likely to develop into scoliosis by adolescence.
In states where recreational marijuana is legal, problematic use increased among adults and teens
Problematic use of marijuana among adolescents and adults increased after legalization of recreational marijuana use, according to a new study from NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
Genetics of species-specific birdsong revealed
Researchers have discovered the genetic mechanism that explains how birds sing different songs depending on their species.
Quantum transition makes electrons behave as if they lack spin
Combining experiments under extreme conditions with theoretical analysis, researchers pursue knowledge that could be used in the future to create a new generation of sustainable functional materials for use in quantum information devices or superconductors.
Theoretical tubulanes inspire ultrahard polymers
Rice University engineers print 3D blocks based on theoretical tubulanes and find they're nearly as hard as diamond.
Graphene: The more you bend it, the softer it gets
New research by engineers at the University of Illinois combines atomic-scale experimentation with computer modeling to determine how much energy it takes to bend multilayer graphene -- a question that has eluded scientists since graphene was first isolated.
Distant worlds under many suns
Astrophysicist Dr Markus Mugrauer of Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany, has discovered many new multiple star systems that contain exoplanets.
How self-reactive immune cells are allowed to develop
A research team at Lund University in Sweden has found the mechanism that controls the growth of B1-cells in mice.
Artificial intelligence to run the chemical factories of the future
A new proof-of-concept study details how an automated system driven by artificial intelligence can design, build, test and learn complex biochemical pathways to efficiently produce lycopene, a red pigment found in tomatoes and commonly used as a food coloring, opening the door to a wide range of biosynthetic applications, researchers report.
Mysteries behind interstellar buckyballs finally answered
Mimicking conditions thought to exist around dying stars, researchers discovered a mechanism that could explain why planetary nebulae are teeming with complex carbon molecules.
When bubbles bounce back
Ultrapure solvents prove there is more than meets the eye when oil and water mix.
Epitaxially-grown molybdenum oxide advances as a bulk-like 2D dielectric layer
Scalable 2D-type MoO3 nanosheets were synthesized via van der Waal epitaxy growth method.
Turning (more) fat and sewage into natural gas
NC State University researchers have developed what is, to date, the most efficient means of converting sewage sludge and restaurant grease into natural gas.
NASA finds heavy rainfall along Central Philippine Coast from Tropical Depression Kalmaegi
Tropical Depression Kalmaegi continues moving west through the Philippine Sea and toward a landfall in the east central Philippines.
New artificial intelligence system automatically evolves to evade internet censorship
UMD researchers developed a tool called Geneva (short for Genetic Evasion), which automatically learns to circumvent censorship.
New technique could optimize PSMA-targeted prostate cancer therapy
Researchers have discovered a new way to optimize results in treating patients with prostate cancer tumors while minimizing negative side effects.
Phage therapy shows promise for treating alcoholic liver disease
A team of researchers including those from King's College London and the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, have for the first time successfully applied bacteriophage (phage) therapy in mice to alcohol-related liver disease.
Evolution can reconfigure gene networks to deal with environmental change
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have unravelled the genetic mechanisms behind tiny waterfleas' ability to adapt to increased levels of phosphorus pollution in lakes.
Understanding transporter proteins at a single-molecule level
Research co-led by a St. Jude investigator and researchers from Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute reveals the mechanics of how some transporter proteins function with stunning specificity.
Rational transparent conductor design provides a boost to carbon nanotubes application
An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Laboratory of Nanomaterials at the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) have rationally designed a novel p-type flexible transparent conductor using single-walled carbon nanotubes.
Women more likely to survive stroke but have poorer recovery than men, study shows
Women are more likely to survive a stroke, but have worse disability and poorer quality of life afterwards compared to men, according to research published in the latest issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Study: Melanoma rates drop sharply among teens, young adults
Cases of melanoma among US adolescents and young adults declined markedly from 2006 to 2015 - even as the skin cancer's incidence continued to increase among older adults and the general population during the span, new research shows.
When reporting climate-driven human migration, place matters
Location matters when talking about how climate might or might not be driving migration from Central America.
Study suggests weight-loss surgery may release toxic compounds from fat into bloodstream
Toxic man-made chemicals -- such as polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides -- that are absorbed into the body and stored in fat may be released into the bloodstream during the rapid fat loss that follows bariatric surgery, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Oldest molecular information to date illuminates the history of extinct Gigantopithecus
In the study, published in Nature, the team rebuilds multiple dental enamel proteins from an approximately two million-year-old Gigantopithecus molar fossil.
Clinical trial in Australia tests effectiveness of naloxone by nose vs. injection for opioid overdose
A randomized clinical trial in Australia tested whether a dose of naloxone administered through the nose was as effective as the same dose delivered by injection to reverse opioid overdose as measured by the need for a rescue dose delivered by injection 10 minutes after the initial treatment.
Study finds no such thing as a low-risk surgery for frail patients
Even a minor surgery such as a laparoscopic gallbladder removal can prove to be a high-risk and even fatal procedure for frail patients, according to new research published in JAMA Surgery.
High expression of apoptosis protein (Api-5) in chemoresistant triple-negative breast cancers
78 TNBC biopsies from patients with different responses to chemotherapy were analysed for API-5 expression before any treatment.
Extinct giant ape directly linked to the living orangutan
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have succeeded in reconstructing the evolutionary relationship between a two million year old giant primate and the living orangutan.
Puberty may offer window to reset effects of early deprived care on stress-response system
The ability to recalibrate how children respond to stress could offer a way to promote resilience.
A new parallel strategy for tackling turbulence on Summit
A Georgia Tech team developed an algorithm for simulating turbulence on Summit, the world's most powerful and smartest supercomputer.
Study: After trade deal, unhealthy foods flowed into Central America, Dominican Republic
The study analyzes the availability of non-nutritious food in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic in the years after the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) was signed between those countries and the US, going into effect in 2006.
Study finds links between early screen exposure, sleep disruption and EBD in kids
A new study by KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH), together with National University of Singapore, has found that first exposure earlier than 18 months of age to screen devices -- such as smartphones, tablets, videogame consoles, television etc -- and the presence of multiple screen devices in the bedroom are associated with elevated sleep disruption and emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) in preschool children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs)
Even low-stress surgery can be fatal for frail patients, study finds
Frail patients were more likely to die within 30, 90 and 180 days after surgery than non-frail patients, even if the surgery was classified as low or moderate stress, according to a study that included a researcher from UT Health San Antonio.
Ancient Egyptians gathered birds from the wild for sacrifice and mummification
In ancient Egypt, sacred ibises were collected from their natural habitats to be ritually sacrificed, according to a study released Nov.
Training family doctors to better support domestic violence survivors
Women who are experiencing domestic violence feel better supported, more confident and less depressed when they are counselled by trained family doctors, according to new research.
Could cytotoxic T-cells be a key to longevity?
Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science (IMS) and Keio University School of Medicine in Japan have used single-cell RNA analysis to find that supercentenarians--meaning people over the age of 110--have an excess of a type of immune cell called cytotoxic CD4 T-cells.
Perovskite solar cells: Possible aspects of high efficiency uncovered
Using crystallographic analyses at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) synchrotron in the United Kingdom, an HZB team has demonstrated that hybrid halide perovskites crystallise without inversion centre.
First look at thermostat wars suggests women may be losing these battles
Your characterization of the thermostat war going on in your house is likely to depend at least in part on whether you're a man or a woman, new research suggests.
Study led by Tulane researchers outlines America's losing battle to lose weight
It comes as no surprise that Americans struggle with weight loss, but a new study led by researchers at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine reveals the extent to which many people try, and fail, to shed extra pounds.
Researchers capture moving object with ghost imaging
Researchers have developed a way to capture moving objects with the unconventional imaging method known as ghost imaging.
People who cannot read may be three times as likely to develop dementia
New research has found that people who are illiterate, meaning they never learned to read or write, may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write.
Something old, something new in the ocean's blue
Microbiologists at the Max Planck Institutes in Marburg and Bremen have discovered a new metabolic process in the ocean.
Inhaled immunosuppressant may increase survival, pulmonary function after lung transplant
University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers found that lung transplant recipients who had early signs of organ rejection could increase their chances of survival by inhaling a liposomal form of the immunosuppression drug cyclosporine through an investigational nebulizer.
Study raises new warnings about frail surgery patients
A Veterans Affairs study has shown that frail surgery patients may be at higher risk than previously thought, leading the researchers to conclude that 'there are no 'low-risk' procedures among frail patients.'
Modeling every building in America starts with Chattanooga
A team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently used the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's Cray XK7 Titan supercomputer to model every building serviced by the Electric Power Board of Chattanooga--all 178,368 of them--and discovered through more than 2 million simulations that EPB could potentially save $11-$35 million per year by adjusting electricity usage during peak critical times.
Spinal injuries: A new technology of electrostimulation for a more effective approach
Delivering a diversified electric message to different fibres of the injured spinal cord through a new technology able to deliver it in a targeted and independent manner.
'Give me the calcium!' Tulane virus takes over cellular calcium signaling to replicate
Researchers uncover the first piece of functional evidence suggesting that Tulane virus and human norovirus use viroporins to control cellular calcium signaling.
Talking with trained doctors can help abused women
Women who are experiencing intimate partner violence feel better supported, more confident, and less depressed when trained family doctors counsel them, according to new research in the journal Family Practice.
Diet trials often amend their outcome measures as they go
A study published today in JAMA Network Open concludes that 86 percent of diet trials amended their desired study outcomes along the way.
New RNA molecules may play a role in aging
Using a new sequencing method, this class of previously invisible RNA molecules were found to be abundantly expressed.
Elucidation of cause of electromagnetic noise allows for EM noise-less electric circuits
Researchers from Osaka University developed equations for quantifying electromagnetic interference (EM noise) and elucidated its origin, allowing for the best circuit configuration to reduce EM noise.
Yale study finds 'hyperhotspots' that could predict skin cancer risk
New research by Yale University scientists reports the discovery of 'hyperhotspots' in the human genome, locations that are up to 170-times more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation (UV) from sunlight compared to the genome average.
Driver found for more deadly prostate cancer
A transcription factor that aids neuron function also appears to enable a cell conversion in the prostate gland that can make an already recurrent cancer even more deadly, scientists say.
Teaching group work to students with autism
Communication skills and group work could be taught alongside regular curricula and a structured protocol, which promotes communication, can go a long way to help children with ASD to socialize with their peers, thereby aiding their development.
Leukaemia cells can transform into non-cancerous cells through epigenetic changes
Researchers of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute discover that a leukaemic cell is capable of transforming into a non-cancerous cell through epigenetic changes.
A study warns about the ecological impact caused by sediment accumulation in river courses
Insects, crustaceans and other water macroinvertebrates are more affected by the effect of sediment accumulation in river courses than the excess of nitrate in water environments, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE.
The smell of old books could help preserve them
Old books give off a complex mélange of odors, ranging from pleasant (almonds, caramel and chocolate) to nasty (formaldehyde, old clothes and trash).
Spot the difference: Two identical-looking bird species with very different genes
While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of China, that diverged from their Northern relatives around half a million years ago.
Improving trauma pain outcomes
A 7-year prospective cohort study from the Corporal Michael J.
Explosion in Tianjin Port enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition over the Bohai Sea
In August 2015, a serious explosion occurred in Tianjin Port, leaving at least 50 dead and hundreds injured.
Punishing pregnant women for opioid use increases risks to infants
Many states have sought to address opioid misuse during pregnancy by adopting laws that consider substance use during pregnancy to be a crime or evidence of child neglect.
Can a UNICORN outrun earthquakes?
A University of Tokyo Team transformed its UNICORN computing code into an AI-like algorithm to more quickly simulate tectonic plate deformation due to a phenomenon called a ''fault slip,'' a sudden shift that occurs at the plate boundary.
Regular use of prescription drugs for pain and sleep increases frailty risk by 95 percent
Regular use of prescription drugs for pain and sleep increases frailty risk by 95 percent among older adults.
Changing weight-loss strategies, attempts
The proportion of adults who tried to lose weight in the previous year increased from 1999 to 2016 but the findings of this observational study suggest the results may have been unsatisfactory.
Climate may have helped crumble one of the ancient world's most powerful civilizations
New research suggests it was climate-related drought that built the foundation for the collapse of the Assyrian Empire (whose heartland was based in today's northern Iraq)--one of the most powerful civilizations in the ancient world.
World's oldest glue used from prehistoric times till the days of the Gauls
By studying artefacts that date back to the first 6 centuries AD through the lens of chemistry, archaeology, and textual analysis, french researchers have discovered birch tar was being used right up to late antiquity, if not longer.
Body language key to zoo animal welfare
Watching the behavior and body language of zoo animals could be the key to understanding and improving their welfare, new research suggests.
Scientists spearhead 'major step forward' for malaria vaccine
Researchers have narrowed down the malaria proteins and disease-fighting antibodies that could be used to develop a vaccine against the most severe forms of malaria.
Chitin-binding proteins override host plant's resistance to fungal infection
A recent Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions article studies chitin-binding proteins from a soilborne fungus (Verticillium nonalfalfae) that causes vascular wilt in plants.
Phage therapy shows promise for alcoholic liver disease
UC San Diego researchers linked a gut bacteria toxin to worse clinical outcomes in patients with alcoholic liver disease, and discovered that treatment with bacteriophages clears the bacteria and eliminates the disease in mice.
System by which plants have formed secondary buds since ancient times illuminated
A collaborative research group has succeeded in identifying an important transcription factor, GCAM1, which allows liverwort plants to asexually reproduce through creating clonal progenies (vegetative reproduction).
Bowel cancer rates after colonoscopy vary by provider
A colonoscopy is the main test used to detect bowel cancer, but like most tests, it is not always 100% accurate and cancers can be missed.
Analysis of melanoma in US by age groups
This study used registry data to determine annual rates of melanoma in pediatric, adolescent, young adult and adult age groups, and the findings suggest an apparent decrease among adolescent and young adults between 2006 and 2015 but increases in older adults.
How Let's Encrypt doubled the internet's percentage of secure websites in four years
A Q&A with J. Alex Halderman, who co-founded the nonprofit organization behind what's now the world's largest certificate authority.
How everyday products are supercharging landfill gas, and what that means
Synthetic compounds increasingly used in everyday products like shampoo and motor oil are finding their way into landfills and supercharging the biogas those landfills produce, researchers at the University of Michigan have found.
ELeCt-ing a better candidate for chemo delivery
Chemo drugs are notoriously toxic, in part because so little of the drug actually gets to its target organ, requiring high doses.
New technique aims to improve imaging of cells
In research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute developed and demonstrated a new technique for fluorescence lifetime imaging of tissue and cells in a fast and comprehensive manner -- laying the groundwork for use in a clinical setting.
Crick researchers unravel protective properties of telomere t-loops
Loops at the ends of telomeres play a vital protective role preventing irretrievable damage to chromosomes, according to new research from the Crick.
Targeting alpha-synuclein in the gut may slow down Parkinson's disease
Aggregates of the protein alpha-synuclein arising in the gut may play a key role in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD).
Knowing your neighbors may shape US household yard care practices
Neighbor peer pressure may be linked to increases in yard fertilization and irrigation across several distinct climate regions of the US, according to a study published Nov.
Just what the doctor ordered: Take a yoga class and depression, anxiety improve
Scientific studies already support yoga practice as a means to reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety.
Climate change expected to shift location of East Asian Monsoons
More than a billion people in Asia depend on seasonal monsoons for their water needs.
Climate change influenced rise and fall of Northern Iraq's Neo-Assyrian Empire
Changes in climate may have contributed to both the rise and collapse of the Neo-Assyrian Empire in northern Iraq, which was considered the most powerful empire of its time, according to a new study.
How the cellular recycling system is put on hold while cells divide
Research involving several teams at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge, UK, has shown that cellular recycling (autophagy) is repressed during the process of cell division, and how repression of autophagy during mitosis utilises a different master regulator.
NASA provides an infrared analysis of Tropical Storm Fengshen
Tropical Storm Fengshen continued to strengthen in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
Eliminating common bacterial infection significantly decreases gastric cancer risk
Penn researchers are first to assess Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer risk in Americans, certain demographics and ethnic groups.
A new facial analysis method detects genetic syndromes with high precision and specificity
Developed by Araceli Morales, Gemma Piella and Federico Sukno, members of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, together with researchers from the University of Washington, which they present in a feature in the advanced online edition of Lecture Notes in Computer Science of Oct.
Pacemakers can improve heart function in patients with chemotherapy-induced heart disease
Research has shown that treating chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy with commercially available cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) delivered through a surgically implanted defibrillator or pacemaker can significantly improve patient outcomes.
Predicting evolution
A new method of 're-barcoding' DNA allows scientists to track rapid evolution in yeast.
Stretchable, degradable semiconductors
To seamlessly integrate electronics with the natural world, materials are needed that are both stretchable and degradable -- for example, flexible medical devices that conform to the surfaces of internal organs, but that dissolve and disappear when no longer needed.
Could the mysteries of antimatter and dark matter be linked?
RIKEN researchers and collaborators have performed the first laboratory experiments to determine whether a slightly different way in which matter and antimatter interact with dark matter might be a key to solving both mysteries.
Crystal coatings could help solve mystery of fracture patterns
A research group led by The University of Texas at Austin is challenging the current scientific paradigm by arguing that mechanics alone is not enough.
At what point does click-bait susceptibility become a mental health disorder?
A new study in Comprehensive Psychiatry, published by Elsevier, found that one third of a group of patients seeking treatment for buying-shopping disorder (BSD) also reported symptoms of addictive online shopping.

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