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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 14, 2019


Global climate change concerns for Africa's Lake Victoria
UH Researcher and team developed a model to project lake levels in world's largest tropical lake
U of M research discovers subcellular computations within the brain during decision-making
New University of Minnesota Medical School research suggests that during decision-making, neurons in the brain are capable of much more complex processing than previously thought.
Discovery reveals mechanism that turns herpes virus on and off
New research from Dr. Luis M. Schang and his group at the Baker Institute for Animal Health has identified a new mechanism that plays a role in controlling how the herpes virus alternates between dormant and active stages of infection.
Bigger doesn't mean better for hatchery-released salmon
A recent study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere examines hatchery practices in regards to how Chinook salmon hatcheries in the PNW are affecting wild populations over the past decades.
Observing changes in the chirality of molecules in real time
Chiral molecules - compounds that are mirror images of each other - play an important role in biological processes and in chemical synthesis.
Parity law improved medicaid acceptance at substance use disorder treatment centers
A 2008 federal parity law succeeded in expanding Medicaid acceptance by treatment facilities for substance use disorders (SUDs), according to a study by University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers.
Direct-to-patient telemedicine cardiology follow-ups may safely save families time, cost
Health provider follow-ups delivered via computer or smartphone is a feasible alternative to in-person patient follow-ups for some pediatric cardiac conditions, according to the findings of a pilot study presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions this week.
Newly developed nanoparticles help fight lung cancer in animal model
Scientists have reported a new approach to treating lung cancer with inhaled nanoparticles developed at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health.
Going with the floe: Sea ice movements trace dynamics transforming the new Arctic
UC Riverside-led research is the first to use MODIS satellite imagery to understand long-term ocean movements from sea ice dynamics.
Smart people may learn music faster
Why do some people learn music more quickly than others?
TGen-USC researchers link sisters' paralysis to an 'extremely rare' genetic variant
Following a nearly 25-year search across three continents, parents of a pair of sisters -- who as children slowly became paralyzed from the waist down -- finally have a diagnosis, according to researchers at USC and TGen.
The invisible US Hispanic/Latino HIV crisis: Addressing gaps in the national response
Vincent Guilamo-Ramos of New York University's Silver School of Social Work unpacks the alarming rate of HIV infections among Hispanics/Latinos, in American Journal of Public Health.
Architecture of a bacterial power plant decrypted
Scientists from the Universities of Würzburg and Freiburg determined the structure of the bacterial enzyme cytochrome bd oxidase.
Get your game face on: Study finds it may help
Could putting on a serious face in preparation for competition actually impact performance?
Improved fitness can mean living longer without dementia
Staying fit or improving fitness over time should be a goal for anyone who wants to reduce the likelihood of getting dementia.
Alpine rock axeheads became social and economic exchange fetishes in the Neolithic
The mechanical capacity to resist successive transformation processes gave these rocks an exceptional exchange value that favoured the formation of long-distance exchange networks in Western Europe, according to a study led by the UAB that integrates petrography, materials science and paleoeconomics.
A one-way street for light
Light can be directed in different directions, usually also back the same way.
Flawless films of alumina glass flex without fracturing at room temperature
Aluminum oxide glass can be rapidly deformed like metal -- folded, twisted and stretched -- without shattering, according to a new study, which evaluates this phenomenon at a small scale.
NASA Sending solar power generator developed at Ben-Gurion U to space station
'These results lay the groundwork for future space microconcentrator photovoltaic systems and establish a realistic path to exceed 350 w/kg specific power at more than 33% power conversion efficiency by scaling down to even smaller microcells,' the researchers say.
Parents want mental health support to reduce stress of children's hospitalizations
Parents of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) want individualized, formal psychosocial support during their children's in-hospital stays, according to a new study published in the Journal of Pediatrics.
Researchers generate terahertz laser with laughing gas
Researchers from MIT, Harvard University, and the U.S. Army have built a compact device, the size of a shoebox, that produces a terahertz laser whose frequency they can tune over a wide range.
Unhealthy habits can start young: Infants, toddlers, and added sugars
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that nearly two-thirds of infants (61%) and almost all toddlers (98%) consumed added sugars in their average daily diets, primarily in the form of flavored yogurts (infants) and fruit drinks (toddlers).
What felled the great Assyrian Empire? A Yale professor weighs in
The Neo-Assyrian Empire, centered in northern Iraq and extending from Iran to Egypt -- the largest empire of its time -- collapsed after more than two centuries of dominance at the fall of its capital, Nineveh, in 612 B.C.E.
Earthquake-like brain-wave bursts found to be essential for healthy sleep
New research in rats shows that cortical arousals and brief awakenings during sleep exhibit non-equilibrium dynamics and complex organization across time scales necessary for spontaneous sleep-stage transitions and for maintaining healthy sleep.
Two ocean studies look at microscopic diversity and activity across entire planet
Two Cell papers use samples and data collected during the Tara Oceans Expedition to analyze current ocean diversity across the planet, providing a baseline to better understand climate change's impact on the oceans.
Yale study: Doctors give electronic health records an 'F'
The transition to electronic health records (EHRs) was supposed to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare for doctors and patients alike -- but these technologies get an 'F' rating for usability from health care professionals, and may be contributing to high rates of professional burnout, according to a new Yale-led study.
Breakthrough in malaria research
An international scientific consortium led by the cell biologists Volker Heussler from the University of Bern and Oliver Billker from the Umeå University in Sweden has for the first time systematically investigated the genome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium throughout its life cycle in a large-scale experiment.
Home-visits before and after birth can benefit caregiving in low- and middle-income settings
A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that home-visiting by trained community workers during and after pregnancy can improve mother-child interactions in the first years of life.
Stanford researchers explore how citizens can become agents of environmental change
Some programs work better than others when it comes to involving citizens in preserving the environment.
State prescription drug monitoring programs: The rise and fall in heroin fatalities
A new study found a consistent association between the adoption of state Prescription Drug Monitoring programs (PDMP) and death rates from heroin poisoning.
Genetic variation in individual brain cell types may predict disease risk
Researchers identified non-coding regions of the human genome that control the development and function of four brain cell types and mapped genetic risk variants for psychiatric diseases.
Rollercoaster weight changes can repeat with second pregnancy, especially among normal-weight women
Everyone knows that gaining excess weight during one pregnancy is bad, but clinicians rarely consider weight gains and losses from one pregnancy to the next -- especially in normal-weight women.
Restoring protein homeostasis improves memory deficits in Down syndrome model
Researchers found that that defects in a conserved stress pathway known as the 'integrated stress response,' or ISR, could explain the cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Down syndrome.
Catchment geology rules freshwater plant communities
Whether freshwater plant communities use carbon dioxide or bicarbonate for photosynthesis is largely related to the bicarbonate concentration in their local environment, according to a new study, the first global evaluation of bicarbonate use among aquatic plants.
'Nudging' heart patients to take their statins leads to better adherence and better outcomes
In a new study presented to heart specialists from around the world, researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City found that simple 'nudges' in the form of texts, emails and phone calls, not only help patients fill that first statin prescription, but also continue to help them take their medications over the long term.
Lifelike chemistry created in lab search for ways to study origin of life
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have cultivated lifelike chemical reactions while pioneering a new strategy for studying the origin of life.
Antibody injection stops peanut allergy for 2 to 6 weeks, Stanford-led study shows
One injection of an antibody treatment let people with severe peanut allergies eat a nut's worth of peanut protein two weeks later, a small, Stanford-led pilot study showed.
Inoculating against the spread of viral misinformation
In the first study of public health-related Facebook advertising, newly published in the journal Vaccine, researchers at the University of Maryland, the George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University show that a small group of anti-vaccine ad buyers has successfully leveraged Facebook to reach targeted audiences and that the social media platform's efforts to improve transparency have actually led to the removal of ads promoting vaccination and communicating scientific findings.
NASA-NOAA satellite finds displaced power in Tropical Cyclone Kalmaegi
Tropical Cyclone Kalmaegi is still experiencing wind shear and those winds have continued to displace the strongest storms north of the cyclone's center.
Researchers block metastasis-promoting enzyme, halt spread of breast cancer
In a breakthrough with important implications for the future of immunotherapy for breast cancer, UC San Francisco scientists have found that blocking the activity of a single enzyme can prevent a common type of breast cancer from spreading to distant organs.
Diverging trends: Binge drinking and depression
Binge drinking among U.S. adolescents precipitously declined from 1991 to 2018, according to a new study at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
MicroRNA comprehensively analyzed
Messenger RNA transmits genetic information to the proteins, and microRNA plays a key role in the regulation of gene expression.
Injection drug use: a new study shows a mixed Canadian portrait
In Canada, 171,900 people injected drugs in 2016, up from 130,000 in 2011.
Scientists close in on malaria vaccine
Scientists have taken another big step forward towards developing a vaccine that's effective against the most severe forms of malaria.
New research quantifies how much speakers' first language affects learning a new language
Linguistic research suggests that accents are strongly shaped by the speaker's first language they learned growing up.
Study dissects attitudes on short-term vacation rentals
Feelings of neighborhood pride, interactions with tourists and a community's laws can all influence how neighbors feel about short-term vacation rentals.
Inflammatory bowel disease appears to impact risk of Parkinson's disease
Amsterdam, NL, November 14, 2019 - Relatively new research findings indicating that the earliest stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) may occur in the gut have been gaining traction in recent years.
Human-machine interactions: Bots are more successful if they impersonate humans
Study examines humans' willingness to cooperate with bots
ASU study shows some aquatic plants depend on the landscape for photosynthesis
ASU researchers found that not only are freshwater aquatic plants affected by climate, they are also shaped by the surrounding landscape.
Turning 'junk' DNA into gold
Mining the rich uncharted territory of the genome or genetic material of a cancer cell has yielded gold for Princess Margaret scientists: new protein targets for drug development against prostate cancer.
Findings could identify aggressive breast cancers that will respond to immunotherapy
UNC Lineberger researchers discovered a biological signature that could help identify which triple negative breast cancers might respond to immunotherapy and other treatments.
FEFU scientists obtained new compounds with potential antitumor effect from sea sponge
Chemists from Far Eastern Federal University's School of Natural Sciences (SNS FEFU) developed a new method to synthesize biologically active derivatives of fascaplysin -- cytotoxic pigment of a sea sponge.
Is opioid treatment available to those who need it most?
The US opioid epidemic is still raging -- it's particularly pronounced in low-income areas and in those where people lack access to health care services, which includes cities in Michigan and across the Rust Belt.
Research reveals new state of matter: a Cooper pair metal
In a finding that reveals an entirely new state of matter, research published in the journal Science shows that Cooper pairs, electron duos that enable superconductivity, can also conduct electricity like normal metals do.
The ways astronauts prep for spaceflight could benefit cancer patients, say researchers
During spaceflight, astronauts experience similar physical stress as cancer patients undergoing treatments such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy.
New research examines how drug promotion rules impact physician prescribing practices
Findings from a new study led by researchers at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine show that the way in which pharmaceutical companies are permitted to share information about their drugs can influence physician prescribing practices.
Women most affected by vascular complications of diabetes
Women are most affected by the vascular complications of diabetes -- a situation likely to escalate in the coming decades, reports a paper published on World Diabetes Day in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
NIST-led team develops tiny low-energy device to rapidly reroute light in computer chips
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have developed an optical switch that routes light from one computer chip to another in just 20 billionths of a second -- faster than any other similar device.
For some urban areas, a warming climate is only half the threat
A new study from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies projects that the growth of urban areas in the coming decades will trigger ''extra'' warming due to a phenomenon known as the urban heat island effect (UHI).
What vision do we have for the deep sea?
The ocean hosts an inconceivable wealth of marine life, most of which remains unknown.
Scientists design built-in controls for mini-chemical labs on a chip
In a miniaturized laboratory, microfluidic systems can conduct chemical experiments on a chip through a series of small connected tubes the size of a hair.
Master regulator in mitochondria is critical for muscle function and repair
New study identifies how loss of mitochondrial protein MICU1 disrupts calcium balance and causes muscle atrophy and weakness.
Study reveals urban hotspots of high-schoolers' opioid abuse
A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that in several cities and counties the proportion of high-schoolers who have ever used heroin or misused prescription opioids is much higher than the national average.
Stress, plastic additives in late pregnancy raise risk of premature birth
Women exposed simultaneously to stress and plastic additives late in pregnancy are at increased risk for premature birth, according to a study by Rutgers and other institutions.
Bisphenol-a structural analogues may be less likely than BPA to disrupt heart rhythm
Some chemical alternatives to plastic bisphenol-a (BPA), which is still commonly used in medical settings such as operating rooms and intensive care units, may be less disruptive to heart electrical function than BPA, according to a pre-clinical study that explored how the structural analogues bisphenol-s (BPS) and bisphenol-f (BPF) interact with the chemical and electrical functions of heart cells.
Design flaw could open Bluetooth devices to hacking
Mobile apps that work with Bluetooth devices have an inherent design flaw that makes them vulnerable to hacking, new research has found.
UNH researchers find climate change and turf seaweed causing 'patchy' seascape
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire find environmental developments caused by climate change are contributing to the transformation of the seafloor to a lower, more patchy seascape dominated by shrub-like seaweed which could impact species habitats and the structure of the food web.
Typhoons and marine eutrophication are probably the missing source of organic nitrogen in ecosystems
Atmospheric nitrogen deposition has a significant impact on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and alterations in its level will significantly affect the productivity and stability of an ecosystem.
FSU researchers develop thin heat shield for superfast aircraft
The world of aerospace increasingly relies on carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites to build the structures of satellites, rockets and jet aircraft.
NTU scientists discover new way to promote insulin production in pre-diabetes phase
NTU Singapore scientists have discovered that a type of immune cell known as 'pancreatic islet macrophages' is capable of promoting insulin production during the pre-diabetes phase.
Blood test for deadly eye melanoma
A simple blood test could soon become the latest monitoring tool for the early detection of melanoma in the eye.
Chemists use light to build biologically active compounds
Many biologically active molecules, including synthetic drugs, contain a central, nitrogen-containing chemical structure with a three-dimensional shape.
In Down Syndrome mouse model, scientists reverse intellectual deficits with drugs
In a surprising finding using the standard animal model of Down syndrome (DS), scientists were able to correct the learning and memory deficits associated with the condition -- the leading genetic cause of cognitive disability and the most frequently diagnosed chromosomal disorder in the US -- with drugs that target the body's response to cellular stresses.
Seeing past the stigma
Plants of the genus Erythroxylum are mainly known due to their use either in Coca Cola or as the drug cocaine.
Zika virus can cause immune and brain abnormalities in asymptomatic pig offspring
Zika virus infection in the womb produces altered immune responses and sex-specific brain abnormalities in apparently healthy pig offspring, according to a study published Nov.
How Crohn's disease-associated bacteria tolerate antibiotics
Bacteria associated with Crohn's disease rely on multiple stress responses to survive, multiply, and tolerate antibiotics within white blood cells called macrophages, according to a study published November 14, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Olivier Espéli of the College de France and PSL Research University in Paris, France, and colleagues.
Storing energy in hydrogen 20 times more effective using platinum-nickel catalyst
Catalysts accelerate chemical reactions, but the widely used metal platinum is scarce and expensive.
Here's how you help kids crack the reading code
Some children learn to read early. Others need more time.
Study: Multidisciplinary transplantation evaluation shows promise for older adults
Older adults with blood cancers can benefit from a team-based, holistic evaluation before undergoing transplantation, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances.
How maternal Zika virus infection results in newborn microcephaly
Researchers have discovered that the Zika virus protein NS4A disrupts brain growth by hijacking a pathway that regulates the generation of new neurons.
Spin doctors: Astrophysicists find when galaxies rotate, size matters
The direction in which a galaxy spins depends on its mass, researchers have found.
New laser opens up large, underused region of the electromagnetic spectrum
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), in collaboration with MIT and the US Army, have developed a compact, room temperature, widely tunable terahertz laser.
Magnetic reconnection on sun's surface launches solar spicules
New observations of solar spicules, ubiquitous jet-like plasma features that punctuate the sun's atmosphere, suggest they are generated by the energy released as the two disparate magnetic fields snap back into alignment near the solar surface.
A potential new way to diagnose male infertility and pharmaceutical treatment options
Washington State University-led research has discovered infertile men have identifiable patterns of epigenetic molecules or biomarkers attached to their sperm DNA that aren't present in fertile men.
There are variations in plankton biodiversity and activity from the equator to the poles
New results from the Tara Oceans expedition, led by a collaboration between the Tara Ocean Foundation and teams from the CNRS, EMBL, CEA, Sorbonne Université and Université Paris Science Lettres between 2009 and 2013 show that the diversity and functions of planktonic species in the global ocean change dramatically according to latitude.
Revised criteria lead to more accurate screening for eye disease in premature infants
A multicenter group of 41 hospitals led by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has confirmed that an improved method for predicting retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a leading cause of blindness in children, was able to reduce the number of babies having invasive diagnostic examinations by nearly a third, while raising disease detection up to 100 percent.
WPI engineers creating miniaturized, wireless oxygen sensor for sick infants
Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) are developing a sensor the size of a Band-Aid that will measure a baby's blood oxygen levels, a vital indication of the lungs' effectiveness and whether the baby's tissue is receiving adequate oxygen supply.
Future rainfall could far outweigh current climate predictions
Scientists from the University of Plymouth analysed rainfall records from the 1870s to the present day with their findings showing there could be large divergence in projected rainfall by the mid to late 21st century.
Nearly half of accused harassers can return to work
What happens behind the scenes when employees are accused of harassment?
Computer scientists develop new tool that generates videos from themed text
A global team of computer scientists, from Tsinghua and Beihang Universities in China, Harvard University in the US and IDC Herzliya in Israel, have developed ''Write-A-Video'', a new tool that generates videos from themed text.
New method described for quantifying antisense oligonucleotides in nuclei
A novel method uses subcellular fractionation to quantify label-free antisense oligonucleotides (AONs)- designed to silence targeted genes - that have crossed into the nucleus of a cell, where they can exert their effects.
Drexel researchers create and stabilize pure polymeric nitrogen using plasma
Researchers at Drexel University's C&J Nyheim Plasma Institute have reported the production of the first pure polymeric nitrogen compound at near-ambient conditions.
Americans maintain high levels of trust in science
A new report analyzing decades of public opinion surveys reveals that the public's trust in scientists has remained stable and high over decades.
Simulation reveals how bacterial organelle converts sunlight to chemical energy
Scientists have simulated every atom of a light-harvesting structure in a photosynthetic bacterium that generates energy for the organism.
Turning waste heat into hydrogen fuel
Hydrogen as an energy carrier can help us move away from fossil fuels, but only if it is created efficiently.
Sugar binges increase risk of inflammatory bowel disease, study suggests
Short-term increases in sugar consumption could increase the risk of inflammatory bowel disease and have a significant impact on our health, a new study out of the University of Alberta suggests.
'Are we alone?' Study refines which exoplanets are potentially habitable
Researchers are first to combine 3D climate modeling with atmospheric chemistry to explore the habitability of planets around M dwarf stars, which comprise about 70% of the total galactic population.
Space-based radar suggests North Korean nuke equivalent to '17 Hiroshimas'
A team of scientists at the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) have used satellite data to augment measurements of North Korean nuclear tests on the ground.
Two cosmic peacocks show violent history of the magellanic clouds
Two peacock-shaped gaseous clouds were revealed in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by observations with ALMA.
Protecting native vegetation on rural properties yields Brazil USD 1.5 trillion per year
Paper endorsed by 407 scientists in Brazil estimates the value of ecosystem services linked to nature conservation, such as pollination, pest control and water security.
Researchers develop a faster, stronger rabies vaccine
Every year, more than 59,000 people around the world die of rabies and there remains no cheap and easy vaccine regimen to prevent the disease in humans.
Genes borrowed from bacteria allowed plants to move to land
Natural genetic engineering allowed plants to move from water to land, according to a new study by an international group of scientists from Canada, China, France, Germany, and Russia.
Sexual minorities continue to face discrimination, despite increasing support
Despite increasing support for the rights of people in the LGBTQ+ community, discrimination remains a critical and ongoing issue for this population, according to researchers.
Link between hearing and cognition begins earlier than once thought
A new study finds that cognitive impairment begins in the earliest stages of age-related hearing loss -- when hearing is still considered normal.
Bottlebrushes rise up to control coatings
A microscopic polymer in the form of a common kitchen implement, the bottlebrush, could give industry exquisite control over the properties of surface coatings.
Multiple change factors across the globe push soil ecosystems to their limit
A new experimental approach that accounts for a larger number of environmental variables can better capture how soil ecosystems around the world may respond to anthropogenic pressures.
We know we're full because a stretched intestine tells us so
We commonly think a full stomach is what tells us to stop eating, but it may be that a stretched intestine plays an even bigger role in making us feel sated, according to new laboratory research led by UC San Francisco neuroscientist Zachary Knight, Ph.D.
Is evolution predictable?
An international team of scientists working with Heliconius butterflies at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama was faced with a mystery: how do pairs of unrelated butterflies from Peru to Costa Rica evolve nearly the same wing-color patterns over and over again?
Tailor-made carbon helps pinpoint hereditary diseases and correct medication dosage
Researchers can now obtain more accurate information than ever before on the structure and surface chemistry of carbon.
New material breaks world record turning heat into electricity
Thermoelectric materials convert heat into electrical energy. The amount of energy that can be generated is measured by the so-called ZT value.
New study dispels myths about what makes youth sports fun for kids
A new study looks at what makes organized sports fun for kids, and some of the findings might surprise you.
Bacteria in the gut may alter ageing process, finds NTU Singapore study
An international research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process, which could lead to the development of food-based treatment to slow it down.
Sociable crows are healthier -- new research
A new study has found that crows living in large social groups are healthier than crows that have fewer social interactions.
Research explores impact of racial discrimination on dating websites for gay, bisexual men
University of Illinois social work professor Ryan Wade is the co-creator of a scale that measures the impact of racialized sexual discrimination on gay and bisexual men of color who encounter it on dating websites and apps.
Efficient, but not without help
HSE University economists analyzed what banks performed best on the Russian market from 2004 to 2015 - state, private, or foreign -owned ones.
Smokers and hypertensive individuals have higher risk of sudden death from brain bleed
Contrary to the previous data, a Finnish study clarifies that smoking and high blood pressure do not protect from death in patients suffering from subarachnoid haemorrhage, the most lethal stroke subtype.
DNA data offers scientific look at 500 years of extramarital sex in Western Europe
Researchers have put DNA evidence together with long-term genealogical data to explore questions of biological fatherhood on a broad scale among people living in parts of Western Europe over the last 500 years.
Can cells collected from bone marrow repair brain damage in babies with CHD?
An upcoming clinical trial at Children's National Hospital will harness cardiopulmonary bypass as a delivery mechanism for a novel intervention designed to stimulate brain growth and repair in children who undergo cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease.
Water could modulate the activity and selectivity of CO2 reduction
A recent study compared the reaction mechanisms of CO2 hydrogenation over the stepped Cu(211) surface in the absence and presence of water by microkinetic simulations.
A step closer to cancer precision medicine
Researchers from the Faculty of Medicine and the Institute for Molecular Medicine (FIMM) at the University of Helsinki have developed a computational model, Combined Essentiality Scoring (CES) that enables accurate identification of essential genes in cancer cells for development of anti-cancer drugs.
Prostate cancer bone metastases thwart immunotherapy by producing TGF-β
Prostate cancer that spreads to the bone triggers the destruction of bone tissue that thwarts the effectiveness of immune checkpoint inhibitors.
NASA infrared data shows strength in Fengshen
Tropical Storm Fengshen's cold cloud top temperatures revealed that the storm was maintaining strength as a strong tropical storm.
Blocking a survival mechanism could tackle melanoma treatment resistance
The effectiveness of current treatments for melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, could be improved by using approaches that wipe out the 'survival system' of cancer cells according to a study published in Nature Communications today.
Advances in the detection of the postoperative progress of abdominal aortic aneurysm
A study published in Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology by a team of researchers from BCN MedTech with the VICOMTech Foundation in San Sebastian, the BioDonostia Health Research Institute and Donostia University Hospital, offers a promising methodology for post-operative CTA time-series registration and subsequent aneurysm biomechanical strain analysis, which correlates with the patient's long-term prognosis.
New study casts doubt on China's organ donation data
The Chinese government may have been systematically misreporting the number of organs it claims it has voluntarily collected since 2010, according to new research published in BMC Medical Ethics.
How HIV infection may raise the risk for sudden cardiac death: New study sheds light
The success of antiretroviral therapies has extended the lives of people living with HIV, long enough for other chronic health conditions to emerge, including a recently documented uptick in sudden death.
Researchers discover a new way in which insulin interacts with its receptor
The biological actions of insulin are mediated by its receptor--the insulin receptor -- which is localized on the cell surface.
Rubber in the environment
The tread on the tyre is worn out, new tyres are needed.
Treatments for leading cause of blindness generate $0.9 to $3 billion
A new economic study, published in JAMA Ophthalmology and conducted by USC researchers at the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics, the Ginsburg Institute for Biomedical Therapeutics, and the Roski Eye Institute, quantifies the benefits of treatment for wAMD.
Chemists map an artificial molecular self-assembly pathway with complexities of life
Two pathways diverged in a chemical synthesis, and one molecule took them both.
Is association between hearing loss, impaired cognition present earlier
Researchers in this observational study looked at whether the association between hearing loss and cognitive impairment is present at earlier levels of hearing loss than previously believed.
Near-infrared electrochromism of a new multilayered complex
A multilayer cyclometalated diruthenium complex was prepared via interfacial layer-by-layer coordination assembly of diruthenium complex with zirconium(IV) ions and exhibited reversible near-infrared electrochromism.
Researchers find new role for dopamine in gene transcription and cell proliferation
A joint group of researchers at the George Washington University and the University of Pittsburgh have found that dopamine and the dopamine D2 receptor modulate expression via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.
Gallium-based solvating agent efficiently analyzes optically active alcohols
A KAIST research team has developed a gallium-based metal complex enabling the rapid chiral analysis of alcohols.

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