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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 18, 2019


Quantum computers learn to mark their own work
A new test to check if a quantum computer is giving correct answers to questions beyond the scope of traditional computing could help the first quantum computer that can outperform a classical computer to be realised.
The little duck that could: Study finds endangered Hawaiian duck endures
New research has found that the genetic diversity of the koloa is high, and conservation efforts on the island of Kauai have been successful.
Vietnam-era women veterans continue to experience wartime stress
Vietnam-era women veterans suffer with stress-related mental health conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depression and generalized anxiety disorder, more than four decades after their service.
Possible new treatment strategy against progeria
Progeria is a very rare disease that affects about one in 18 million children and results in premature aging and death in adolescence from complications of cardiovascular disease.
Opening Medicare to Americans aged 50 to 64 would cut their insurance costs
Policymakers have long discussed allowing people under the age of 65 to buy into Medicare.
UC study estimates mild cognitive impairment among diverse Latino populations at 10%
The first and largest study of its kind has estimated the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment in diverse Latino populations.
2/3 of parents cite barriers in recognizing youth depression
Telling the difference between a teen's normal ups and downs and something bigger is among top challenges parents face in identifying youth depression, a new national poll suggests.
AI could transform how we monitor the structural health of civil infrastructure
The University of Surrey and King's College London have developed a new machine learning algorithm (AI) that could transform the way we monitor major infrastructure - such as dams and bridges.
Implementing no-till and cover crops in Texas cotton systems
Healthy soil leads to productive and sustainable agriculture. Farmers who work with, not against, the soil can improve the resiliency of their land.
Screening for thyroid dysfunction in people without symptoms: Don't routinely check that box
A new guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommends against routine screening for thyroid dysfunction in nonpregnant adults without symptoms or risk factors.
Protein imaging at the speed of life
A team of physicists from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee have completed the first molecular movie of the ultrafast movement of proteins at the European XFEL facility.
Hear this: Healthful diet tied to lower risk of hearing loss
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that eating a healthy diet may reduce the risk of acquired hearing loss.
A genetic tug-of-war between the sexes begets variation
In species with sexual reproduction, no two individuals are alike and scientists have long struggled to understand why there is so much genetic variation.
Is early menopause associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease?
Whether natural premature menopause and premature menopause that results from surgery to remove a woman's ovaries before age 40 are associated with increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases was the focus of this observational study.
Heart-on-a-chip technology predicts preclinical systolic and diastolic in vivo observations for novel cardiac drug in development
MyoKardia presented data at the American Heart Association's annual meeting that showed TARA's heart-on-a-chip system was able to measure in vivo cardiac performance of its Phase 2 cardiac drug candidate.
Majority US parents cite socioeconomic factors negatively impact their families' health
Nearly two-thirds of American parents of children under 18 (65%) report at least one economic, environmental, or lifestyle factor that limits their family's ability to live a healthy life, according to a new nationwide survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Nemours Children's Health System.
HKU Engineering team invents novel Direct Thermal Charging Cell for Converting low-grade waste heat to usable electricity
Dr Tony Shien-Ping Feng of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Hong Kong (HKU) and his team invented a Direct Thermal Charging Cell (DTCC) which can effectively convert heat to electricity, creating a huge potential to reduce greenhouse effects by capturing exhaust heat and cutting down primary energy wastage.
Philadelphia had 46 neighborhood mass shootings over 10 years, Temple-led team finds
The definition of mass shooting varies widely depending upon the information sources that are used.
How religion can heighten or help with financial stress
Researchers found that some people experience financial stress due, in part, to their religion's demands on their time and money.
The measurements of the expansion of the universe don't add up
Physicists use two types of measurements to calculate the expansion rate of the universe, but their results do not coincide, which may make it necessary to touch up the cosmological model.
Patients with advanced breast cancer are being denied access to life-prolonging drug
Survival for patients with the most common forms of advanced breast cancer could be substantially improved if both younger and older patients had access to a group of anti-cancer drugs called CDK4/6 inhibitors, according to experts at the Advanced Breast Cancer Fifth International Consensus Conference (ABC5) in Lisbon today (Saturday).
Living bridges
Dense, humid broadleaf forests, monsoon-swollen rivers and deep ravines -- in the Indian state of Meghalaya wooden bridges easily decay or are washed away in floodwaters.
Among people with bipolar disorder, inflammation predicts cognitive deficits
A team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital has conducted the largest study to date of people with bipolar disorder that examined whether inflammation may play an important role in patient outcomes.
Blowing bubbles: PPPL scientist confirms way to launch current in fusion plasmas
PPPL physicist Fatima Ebrahimi has used high-resolution computer simulations to investigate the practicality of the CHI start-up technique.
Switching to renewable energy could save thousands of lives in Africa
New research from Harvard University and the University of Leicester finds that if Africa chooses a future powered by fossil fuels, nearly 50,000 people could die prematurely each year from fossil fuel emissions by 2030, mostly in South Africa, Nigeria and Malawi.
New clinical guideline for the treatment and prevention of drug-resistant tuberculosis
The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, European Respiratory Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America have published an official clinical guideline on the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in the Nov.
Can plants tell us something about longevity?
The oldest living organism on Earth is a plant, Methuselah a bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) (pictured below) that is over 5,000 years old.
Moss: a bio-monitor of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the Yangtze River Delta
The epilithic moss Haplocladium microphyllum can bio-monitor the rates and sources of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region, making up for the lack of monitoring data of N deposition.
Cancer trends in Canada from 1971 to 2015
The overall rate of new cancer cases is decreasing in men but increasing in women younger than 80 years, and obesity-related cancers are increasing in young people, according to a study on cancer trends in Canada from 1971 to 2015 published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association).
Steep energy bills can lead families into poverty, nationwide study shows
While it makes sense that families living below the poverty line have a difficult time covering their energy bills, new University of Wisconsin Oshkosh research shows the reverse to be true as well ... high energy bills can lead a household into poverty.
More children survive neuroblastoma
Both the survival rate and the incidence of neuroblastoma have increased in the last decennia in the Netherlands, as was shown by a study from the Princess Máxima Center.
Mantis shrimp vs. disco clams: Colorful sea creatures do more than dazzle
Eight years ago, Lindsey Dougherty encountered a colorful creature called a disco clam in an Indonesian reef.
Statins not associated with memory or cognition decline in elderly, may be protective in some patients
Given consumer concern that statins may be associated with memory or cognitive decline, a new study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology may offer reassurance, as no difference was found in the rate of memory or cognitive decline of elderly statin-users compared to never-users.
A century later, plant biodiversity struggles in wake of agricultural abandonment
Decades after farmland was abandoned, plant biodiversity and productivity struggle to recover, according to new University of Minnesota research.
One-two punch drug combination offers hope for pancreatic cancer therapy
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have identified a combination of two anti-cancer compounds that shrank pancreatic tumors in mice -- supporting the immediate evaluation of the drugs in a clinical trial.
'Dual login' mechanism found to resist fungal infection in cells
Indiana University researchers have identified how two immune receptors coordinate closely to trigger a powerful response against fungal invaders, which could help advance research on cancer therapies.
NASA finds light rain in fading tropical depression fengshen
A NASA analysis of rainfall rates shows that the once mighty Fengshen is now a depression devoid of heavy rainfall.
Paper: Outcomes vary for workers who 'lawyer up' in employment arbitration disputes
A worker who retains legal counsel to litigate a workplace dispute in arbitration doesn't account for the potentially countervailing effect of employers hiring their own legal counsel, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor Ryan Lamare.
Craigslist linked to 15% increase in drug abuse facilities, 6% increase in overdose deaths
New research in the INFORMS journal Management Science looks at the influence online platforms have on the rising illegal drug epidemic.
Research reveals no link between statins and memory loss
Over 6 years, researchers evaluated the cognitive effects of statins in elderly consumers, revealing no negative impact and potential protective effects in those at risk of dementia.
Bees 'surf' atop water
Ever see a bee stuck in a pool? He's surfing to escape.
New screening method identifies inhibitors of cancer cell metabolism
A new screening system developed by scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center leverages redundancy in an important component of a cell - nucleotide metabolism - to help identify new drugs that specifically and potently block processes that are essential for cancer cell growth.
Boosting wind farmers, global winds reverse decades of slowing and pick up speed
In a boon to wind farms, average daily wind speeds are picking up across much of the globe after about 30 years of gradual slowing.
How much energy do we really need?
Two fundamental goals of humanity are to eradicate poverty and reduce climate change, and it is critical that the world knows whether achieving these goals will involve trade-offs.
Should scientists change the way they view (and study) same sex behavior in animals?
In a new article, researchers from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies argue these behaviors may actually have been part of the original, ancestral condition in animals and have persisted because they have few -- if any -- costs and perhaps some important benefits.
Study measures impact of agriculture on diet of wild mammals
In an article published in PNAS, Brazilian researchers stress the need for agricultural management that favors the maintenance of wildlife.
Mechanism connects early binge drinking to adult behaviors
Intermittent exposure to high levels of alcohol in adolescent animals leads to increased levels of microRNA-137 in the brains of adults.
Army project may lead to new class of high-performance materials
Synthetic biologists working on a U.S. Army project have developed a process that could lead to a new class of synthetic polymers that may create new high-performance materials and therapeutics for Soldiers.
Potato virus Y is the most serious threat to potato -- some strains more than others
Potato virus Y (PVY) is the most serious problem facing the potato industry in the United States and is the main cause for rejection of seed potato lots.
Saving 'half Earth' for nature would affect over a billion people
Plans to save biodiversity must take into account the social impacts of conservation if they are to succeed, say University of Cambridge researchers.
NASA finds light rain in fading Tropical Depression 21E
Tropical Depression 21E never matured into a tropical storm and a NASA analysis of rainfall rates show the storm won't have that chance.
Adolescent drinking increases anxiety, alcohol abuse later in life
Adolescent binge drinking modifies gene expression in a fashion that increases susceptibility to anxiety and alcohol use disorders in adulthood, according to research in rats recently published in eNeuro.
Dozens of potential new antibiotics discovered with free online app
A new web tool speeds the discovery of drugs to kill Gram-negative bacteria, which are responsible for the overwhelming majority of antibiotic-resistant infections and deaths.
Borderline personality disorder has strongest link to childhood trauma
People with Borderline Personality Disorder are 13 times more likely to report childhood trauma than people without any mental health problems, according to University of Manchester research.
Nitrous oxide levels are on the rise
Nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas and one of the main stratospheric ozone depleting substances on the planet.
New 3D printing technique produces 'living' 4D materials
UNSW Sydney researchers have successfully merged 3D/4D printing with a chemical process to produce 'living' resin, which has huge potential for fields as diverse as recycling and biomedicine.
Balancing elementary steps for boosting alkaline hydrogen evolution
Recently, Professors Jin-Song Hu and Li-Jun Wan from Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators designed the nanocrystals with tunable Ni/NiO heterosurfaces to target Volmer and Heyrovsky/Tafel steps in the alkaline hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and discovered that such bicomponent active sites on the surface should be balanced for promoting HER performance.
Researchers bring gaming to autonomous vehicles
Researchers have designed multiplayer games occupants of autonomous vehicles can play with other players in nearby self-driving cars.
Nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, is on the rise
A new study from an international group of scientists finds we are releasing more of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide into the atmosphere than previously thought.
How gene expression noise shapes cell fate
Max Planck researcher develops a method for measuring gene expression noise across single cells in complex tissue.
Subtle changes, big effects
According to the chaos theory in mathematics, a minute change such as the 'flap of a butterfly's wing' could cause huge changes elsewhere.
Article proposes important mucin link between microbial infections and many cancers
In a review article, cancer biologists Pinku Mukherjee and Mukulika Bose argue that recent research suggests a mechanism that may implicate bacterial infections as important factors in epithelial cell cancers.
People in counties with worse economies are more likely to die from heart disease
Communities in the United States that experienced the most economic distress in the wake of the Great Recession saw a significant increase in death rates from heart disease and strokes among middle-aged people.
Shark proof wetsuit material could help save lives
A new wet suit material tested by Flinders marine researchers can help reduce blood loss caused by shark bites, to reduce injuries and prevent the leading cause of death from shark bites.
Metabolic syndrome: New use for an old drug
The discovery, described in a study by Cosbi and Cimec of the University of Trento published today in Nature Communications, confirms the effectiveness of repurposing, the new frontier of pharmacological research.
ECDC: Study shows gaps in healthcare workers' knowledge and attitudes about antibiotics
Knowledge and awareness of antibiotic resistance and related issues is generally high among European healthcare workers, according to the first European survey to examine attitudes and behaviours in relation to antibiotic resistance in this group.
Effects of HIV self-tests on testing, diagnosis
A 12-month randomized clinical trial used internet recruitment of men who have sex with men to evaluate the effects of providing self-tests for HIV to increase HIV testing and diagnosis among the men and people in their social networks.
Discovery in ferroelectric material reveals unique property, application potential
A discovery from a team of physicists and other researchers is breaking new ground in the study of ferroelectricity, a characteristic of certain dielectric materials that are used in high-technology applications.
First evidence of the impact of climate change on Arctic Terns
New study shows how changes in Antarctic sea ice is driving one of the world's smallest seabirds to forage further for food.
Quantum light improves sensitivity of biological measurements
In a new study, researchers showed that quantum light can be used to track enzyme reactions in real time.
Google's new system captures character lighting for virtually any environment
Computer scientists at Google are revolutionizing the area of volumetric capture technology with a novel, comprehensive system that is able, for the first time, to capture full-body reflectance of 3D human performances, and seamlessly blend them into the real world through AR or into digital scenes in films, games, and more.
Study of Wisconsin walleye finds recreational fishing contributes to stock declines
New research shows that shows when stocks of fish get so low that it becomes a greater challenge to catch them, many anglers step up to the challenge and continue catching fish.
Virtual 'moonwalk' for science reveals distortions in spatial memory
In order to orient ourselves in space, and to find our way around, we form mental maps of our surroundings.
New method takes analysis of genetic libraries to next level
Uppsala researchers have developed a new method for investigating dynamic processes in large genetic libraries.
Money spent on beer ads linked to underage drinking
Advertising budgets and strategies used by beer companies appear to influence underage drinking, according to new research.
A four-way switch promises greater tunability of layered materials
A scientific team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Vanderbilt University has made the first experimental observation of a material phase that had been predicted but never seen.
Personality traits affect retirement spending
How quickly you spend your savings in retirement may have as much or more to do with your personality than whether you have a lot of debt or want to leave an inheritance.
Job losses during the Great Recession may be responsible for decline in US birth rates
New research published this month in the Southern Economic Journal reveals job losses during the Great Recession (2007-2009) may be partly responsible for the recent drop in U.S. birth rates.
Gut microbiota imbalance promotes the onset of colorectal cancer
Researchers have demonstrated that an imbalance in the gut microbiota, also known as 'dysbiosis', promotes the onset of colorectal cancer.
Gene therapy: Development of new DNA transporters
Scientists at the Institute of Pharmacy at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed new delivery vehicles for future gene therapies.
New, slippery toilet coating provides cleaner flushing, saves water
In the Wong Laboratory for Nature Inspired Engineering, housed within the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Materials Research Institute, researchers have developed a method that dramatically reduces the amount of water needed to flush a conventional toilet, which usually requires 6 liters.
Disparities in care, mortality among hospitalized homeless adults with cardiovascular conditions
Disparities in hospital care as measured by procedure rates and in-hospital death rates between homeless and nonhomeless adults hospitalized for cardiovascular conditions in New York, Massachusetts and Florida were examined in this observational analysis.
Pollution from Athabasca oil sands affects weather processes
Scientists have been looking at pollution affecting the air, land and water around the Athabaska Oil Sands for some time.
Heart pumps associated with complications in some patients after heart stent procedure
In critically ill patients who require a heart pump to support blood circulation as part of stent procedures, specific heart pumps have been associated with serious complications, according to a new study led by cardiologists at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Barbra Streisand featured in JAMA podcast on heart disease in women
Oscar-winner, recording artist and filmmaker Barbra Streisand, who helped create a namesake Women's Heart Center at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, and Noel Bairey Merz, M.D., the center's director, discuss cardiovascular disease in women, which often presents differently and may not be diagnosed.
CEOs' political leanings skew firms' logic in structuring initial pay packa
Newly appointed, conservative CEOs who are naturally more risk averse receive less performance-based pay than those who are more willing to take risks, and more liberal CEOs get more performance-based pay, according to research from Timothy Hubbard.
Scientists make vampire bats 'glow' to simulate vaccine spread
University of Michigan scientists and their colleagues used glowing fluorescent gel to test the potential effectiveness of vaccines to control rabies and other diseases in wild bats.
Structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase
SciLifeLab researchers Alexander Mühleip and Alexey Amunts from Stockholm University solved the structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase with native lipids.
Get over it? When it comes to recycled water, consumers won't
If people are educated on recycled water, they may come to agree it's perfectly safe and tastes as good -- or better -- than their drinking water.
Most physicians and other faculty in large medical center experienced sexual harassment
A new study has shown that the majority of women (82.5%) and men (65.1%) working at an academic medical center reported at least one incident of sexual harassment by staff, students, and faculty during the previous year.
New finding on origin of avian predentary in Mesozoic birds
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology reported new finding on origin of avian predentary in Mesozoic birds.
Sierra Nevada has oldest underground water recharge system in Europe
Scientists from the University of Granada, the IGME, and the Universities of Cologne and Lisbon have demonstrated that the careo irrigation channels of Sierra Nevada constitute the oldest underground aquifer recharge system on the continent.
What will make grandma use her Fitbit longer?
For older adults, Fitbits and other activity trackers may be popular gifts, but they may not be used for very long.
Experimental cholesterol-lowering drug effective at lowering bad cholesterol, study shows
Twice-yearly injections of an experimental cholesterol-lowering drug, inclisiran, were effective at reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, often called bad cholesterol, in patients already taking the maximum dose of statin drugs, according to data of the ORION-10 trial presented Saturday, Nov.
Communication support technology for training surgeons has promising results
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and Anne Arundel Medical Center have conducted a study that explores how surgical trainees are experiencing a new gestural technology designed to improve communication during laparoscopic surgery.
Genetic alterations caused by cancer therapies identified
Scientists at IRB Barcelona determine the genetic alterations in the cells of cancer patients caused by the main cancer therapies.
Opioid prescription doses are increasingly being tapered, often more rapidly than recommended
Stigma and safety fears have made daily dose tapering of opioid prescriptions more common.
Antibiotics from the sea
The team led by Prof. Christian Jogler of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, has succeeded in cultivating several dozen marine bacteria in the laboratory -- bacteria that had previously been paid little attention.
Scientists and schoolkids find family soups have antimalarial properties
London schoolchildren have found that some of their families' soup recipes have antimalarial properties, with the help of Imperial scientists.
Researchers split the 'AtoM' in search of a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, disabling disease in which the joints become swollen and painfully inflamed.
Scientists uncover resistance genes for deadly ash tree disease
New research has identified the genetic basis of resistance to ash dieback in UK trees, opening up new avenues for conservation.
Unlikely wasp enemy of a serious alien pest in North America named Idris elba
Idris is a worldwide genus of microscopic, parasitic wasps. A new species of Idris from Mexico (Guanajuato) and the United States (California, New Mexico) proved to be an unlikely enemy of the invasive bagrada bug, a major pest of various crops, including cruciferous vegetables.
How to observe a 'black hole symphony' using gravitational wave astronomy
New research led by Vanderbilt astrophysicist Karan Jani presents a compelling roadmap for capturing intermediate-mass black hole activity.
Directional control of self-propelled protocells
Synthetic protocells can be made to move toward and away from chemical signals, an important step for the development of new drug-delivery systems that could target specific locations in the body.
Disease outbreaks are increasing; a Drexel study shows that legislators are taking action
Vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) outbreaks are increasing in frequency in the United States, but this trend is also met with an uptick in legislation aimed at increasing childhood vaccination in places where those epidemics occurred, according to findings published today in JAMA Pediatrics from researchers at the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel University.
Kick-starting Moore's Law? New 'synthetic' method for making microchips could help
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a new method for producing atomically-thin semiconducting crystals that could one day enable more powerful and compact electronic devices, according to their paper published today in Nature Nanotechnology.
High-protein diets may harm your kidneys
High protein intake is believed to be healthy, but it may pave the way to irreversible kidney failure.
Superbug battle: Bacteria structure may be key to new antibiotics
Cornell researchers have uncovered the structure of a regulatory mechanism unique to bacteria, opening the door for designing new antibiotics targeted to pathogens.
Platforms can't settle on 'appropriate' engagement-boosting practices
Researchers at Rutgers University say more consistent standards are needed for advertisers, journalists, influencers and marketers seeking to boost their visibility on platforms such as Google, Facebook and Instagram.
New assessment finds EU electricity decarbonization discourse in need of overhaul
It's well known that the EU is focusing its efforts on decarbonizing its economy.
SwRI Technology Today Podcast celebrates first anniversary
Southwest Research Institute's Technology Today Podcast celebrates one year of giving listeners an inside perspective on world-changing science, engineering, research and technology through informative conversations with SwRI experts.
NASA finds heavy rain potential in typhoon Kalmaegi
NASA analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Typhoon Kalmaegi using infrared light to determine the strength of the storm.
Tailored T-cell therapies neutralize viruses that threaten kids with PID
Tailored T-cells specially designed to combat a half dozen viruses are safe and may be effective in preventing and treating multiple viral infections, according to research led by Children's National Hospital faculty presented during a symposium jointly led by Children's National and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Study-Disparities in care among homeless adults hospitalized for cardiovascular conditions
In a new retrospective study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine, a team of researchers led by Rishi Wadhera, MD, MPP, MPhil, an investigator in the Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), found that there are indeed striking disparities in in-hospital care and mortality between homeless and non-homeless adults.
Vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and state legislative proposals
This study explored how health is associated with legislative activity by examining whether outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, mumps, whooping cough and chickenpox, were associated with the introduction of legislation in states to change vaccine exemption laws.
HIV drug exposure in womb may increase child risk of microcephaly, developmental delays
Children born to women on HIV therapy containing the drug efavirenz were 2 to 2.5 times more likely to have microcephaly, or small head size, compared to children born to women on regimens of other antiretroviral drugs, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Ketamine reduces drinking in male, but not female, rats
The drug ketamine decreases alcohol consumption in male, but not female, rats, according to new research published in eNeuro.
Helicopter parents and 'hothouse children' -- exploring the high stakes of family dynamics
Kristin Moilanen, associate professor of child development and family studies, said the phenomena of helicopter parenting most often occurs in middle- to upper-class families where stakes are high for parents to be able to show off their children's success.
Side effects mild, brief with single antidepressant dose of intravenous ketamine
Researchers found that a single, low-dose ketamine infusion was relatively free of side effects for patients with treatment-resistant depression.
Researchers clear the path for 'designer' plants
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia has found a way to identify gene regulatory elements that could help produce 'designer' plants and lead to improvements in food crops at a critical time.
Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs
Artificial light at night negatively impacts thousands of species: beetles, moths, wasps and other insects that have evolved to use light levels as cues for courtship, foraging and navigation.
The difference between an expert's brain and a novice's
In learning new tasks, neuron networks in the brain of mice become more refined and selective.
Ohio University research shows 'bad cholesterol' is only as unhealthy as its composition
New research at Ohio University shows that a particular subclass of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) is a much better predictor of potential heart attacks than the mere presence of LDL.
How LISA pathfinder detected dozens of 'comet crumbs'
A team of NASA scientists leveraged LISA Pathfinder's record-setting sensitivity (designed to ripples in space-time produced by, among other things, merging black holes) for a different purpose much closer to home -- mapping microscopic dust shed by comets and asteroids.
Measuring online behavioral advertising: One more step to protect users
When we search for information on the Internet, buy online or use social networks we often see ads relating to our likes or profile.
Fertilization discovery could lead to new male contraceptive, help infertile couples
An unexpected discovery about fertilization reveals new insights into how sperm and egg fuse and could have major implications for couples battling infertility -- and may lead to a future male contraceptive.
Are hyoliths Palaeozoic lophophorates?
Liu et al. describe, for the first time, the feeding apparatus of an orthothecid hyolith, Triplicatella opimus, from the Chengjiang biota in South China.
Foam offers way to manipulate light
A study by Princeton scientists has shown that a type of foam long studied by scientists is able to block particular wavelengths of light, a coveted property for next-generation information technology that uses light instead of electricity.
Uncovering the pathway to wine's acidity
University of Adelaide wine researchers say their latest discovery may one day lead to winemakers being able to manipulate the acidity of wines without the costly addition of tartaric acid.
Standard treatment programmes for OCD are not always enough
Teenagers with the contamination and washing variant of OCD are not generally more ill than children and adolescents with other forms of disabling obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviour.
New findings on the largest natural sulfur source in the atmosphere
An international research team was able to experimentally show in the laboratory a completely new reaction path for the largest natural sulfur source in the atmosphere.

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