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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 20, 2019


Skipping breakfast linked to lower GCSE grades
Students who rarely ate breakfast on school days achieved lower GCSE grades than those who ate breakfast frequently, according to a new study in Yorkshire.
Inflammatory processes drive progression of Alzheimer's and other brain diseases
Inflammation drives the progression of neurodegenerative brain diseases and plays a major role in the accumulation of tau proteins within neurons.
70% of teens surveyed engaged with food and beverage brands on social media in 2017
70% of teens surveyed report engaging with food and beverage brands on social media and 35 percent engaged with at least five brands, according to a new study from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity.
LGBTQ beauty vloggers draw on queer culture to stand out
New Cornell research explores how a racially diverse group of LGBTQ beauty vloggers navigates seemingly contradictory roles: masculine and feminine; authentic and heavily made up.
When grown right, palm oil can be sustainable
Turning an abandoned pasture into a palm tree plantation can be carbon neutral, according to a new study by EPFL and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL).
Breaking the limits: Discovery of the highest-energy photons from a gamma-ray burst
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are brief and extremely powerful cosmic explosions, suddenly appearing in the sky, about once per day.
Black carbon found in the Amazon River reveals recent forest burnings
International study quantified and characterized charcoal and soot produced by incomplete burning of trees and transported by river to the Atlantic.
Estimating the environmental impact of Bitcoin mining
As an alternative to government-issued money, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin offers relative anonymity, no sales tax and freedom from bank and government interference.
Probing the role of an inflammation resolution sensor in obesity and heart failure
After heart attack injury, ALX/FPR2 is activated by resolvin D1 in immune cells in the spleen and in immune cells at the heart attack site.
Neural compass
Harvard Medical School neuroscientists have decoded how visual cues can rapidly reorganize the activity of compass neurons in fruit flies to maintain an accurate sense of direction.
New hybrid device can both capture and store solar energy
Researchers have reported a new device that can both efficiently capture solar energy and store it until it is needed, offering promise for applications ranging from power generation to distillation and desalination.
Exposure to air pollutants from power plants varies by race, income and geography
Many people take electricity for granted -- the power to turn on light with the flip of a switch, or keep food from spoiling with refrigeration.
Study finds associations between rheumatoid arthritis, other diseases before and after diagnosis
A Mayo Clinic-led study involving 3,276 patients has found that people with inflammatory bowel disease, Type 1 diabetes or blood clots may be at increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.
Slowing down -- Is aging caused by decreased cellular metabolism?
University of Tsukuba researchers have uncovered new information regarding the effects of impaired expression of the gene SHMT2 in genetically modified mice.
Pregnant women with eating disorders and their children run higher risk of complications
Pregnant women with eating disorders should undergo extended pregnancy screenings considering their increased risk of complications.
Mount Sinai researchers uncover new molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease
Scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have uncovered new molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease using a sophisticated statistical technique called multiscale gene network analysis (MGNA).
Prior exposure to pollutants could underlie increased diabetes risk of Indian immigrants
In 2004, the United Nations Stockholm Convention banned the production and use of many persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).
Harvesting energy from walking human body Lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester develop
A research team led by Professor Wei-Hsin Liao from the Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has developed a lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester for scavenging energy from human motion, generating inexhaustible and sustainable power supply just from walking.
Soft skin-like robots you can put in your pocket
Stretchable skin-like robots that can be rolled up and put in your pocket have been developed by a University of Bristol team using a new way of embedding artificial muscles and electrical adhesion into soft materials.
College students may get health benefits from less than one extra hour of sleep
In a study led by Penn State, researchers found that when asked to extend their sleep, college students were able to get an additional 43 minutes of sleep per night on average.
Study: Young children can learn math skills from intelligent virtual characters
A new study examined whether young children's verbal engagement with an onscreen interactive media character could boost their math skills.
UK Study: Lack of economic support hinders cognitive abilities of children of single mothers
A new study examined how the impact of single motherhood on children's verbal cognitive abilities has changed and how the age of children when their parents separate affects those abilities.
Largest study ever finds that urban green space can prevent premature deaths
The study provides robust evidence that may help policy makers estimate the impact of increasing green space in cities.
DDT linked to higher risk of diabetes among Asian Indian immigrants to US
Previous exposure to the pollutant DDT may contribute to the risk of diabetes among Asian Indian immigrants to the United States, according to a UC Davis study.
Hubble studies gamma-ray burst with the highest energy ever seen
New observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have investigated the nature of the gamma-ray burst GRB 190114C.
Not so selfish after all--Key role of transposable elements in mammalian evolution
A scientist at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has revealed a key role for 'selfish' transposable elements in the evolution of the mammary gland, a defining feature of all mammals.
Study examines Appalachian Kentucky's breast cancer care disparities
Despite the benefits of breast reconstruction, women from Appalachia are less likely to have the surgery than non-Appalachian Kentuckians, according to a new study by the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center.
New report: The impact of energy booms on local workers
A new IZA World of Labor report publishing today finds energy booms create a broad set of benefits for local workers in the short term including lower unemployment and higher wages.
Menopause isn't the only reason for low libido in older women
A qualitative study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found that women in their 60s report various reasons behind why they lack libido -- including sexual dysfunction in their partners.
Atopic eczema linked to increase fracture risk in adults
Adults with atopic eczema could face a raised risk of fracture, with the risk increasing the more severe the condition, according to a new study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.
Underwater robotic gliders provide key tool to measure ocean sound levels
At a time when ocean noise is receiving increased global attention, researchers at Oregon State University have developed an effective method to use an underwater robotic glider to measure sound levels over broad areas of the sea.
The evolution of neuroscience as a research
When the first issue of the JDR was published, the field of neuroscience did not exist but over subsequent decades neuroscience has emerged as a scientific field that has particular relevance to dentistry.
An ancient snake's cheekbone sheds light on evolution of modern snake skulls
New research from a collaboration between Argentinian and University of Alberta palaeontologists adds a new piece to the puzzle of snake evolution.
This humidity digester breathes in atmospheric water and exhales energy
Integrating a super moisture-absorbent gel with light-active materials, researchers in Singapore have developed a humidity digester to dry the ambient air while generating energy.
Obesity embargo alert for December 2019 issue
All print, broadcast and online journalists who receive the Obesity embargo alert agree to abide by the embargo and may not publish, post, broadcast or distribute embargoed press releases or details of the embargoed studies before the embargo date and time.
Researchers discover highest-energy light from a gamma-ray burst
An international team of researchers has observed a gamma-ray burst with an afterglow that featured the highest energy photons -- a trillion times more energetic than visible light -- ever detected in a burst.
Little-known protein appears to play important role in obesity and metabolic disease
With unexpected findings about a protein that's highly expressed in fat tissue, scientists at Scripps Research have opened the door to critical new understandings about obesity and metabolism.
R.I. researchers, policymakers outline new framework for opioid use disorder treatment
Aiming to reduce treatment gaps and guide state policy, a diverse set of voices from Brown University and the State of Rhode Island developed a cascade of care model for opioid use disorder.
NASA estimates tropical storm Sebastien's rainfall rates
NASA found moderate rainfall occurring over a large area in Tropical Storm Sebastien, as it moves through the Atlantic Ocean.
Addressing challenges in inter-rater reliability in traditional chinese medicine
Diagnostic agreement between practitioners is an ongoing challenge in the evaluation of Traditional Chinese Medicine and other healthcare systems that rely on constitutional types.
Creating viral targets can weaken HIV vaccination
Vaccination against HIV/SIV can backfire if the vaccine induces the wrong kind of immune response.
Planting on pasture land may provide sustainable alternative for oil palm plantations
Converting already-degraded pasture to oil palm plantations avoids the large loss of stored carbon associated with clearing rainforests to make way for these plantations, according to a long-term, Colombia-based study.
Unruly T cells complicate the intended benefits of HIV vaccines
Inducing strong responses from T helper (TH) cells -- long seen as a desirable goal for HIV vaccines -- and using multiple antigens can hamper the effectiveness of vaccine candidates for HIV, according to an analysis of macaque experiments and a multicenter, phase 1 trial.
IADR's Women Pioneers: Celebrating a Century of Achievement published in Advances in Dental Research
The latest issue of Advances in Dental Research, an e-Supplement to the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), 'IADR's Women Pioneers: Celebrating a Century of Achievement' highlights the history of the tremendous advancements in dental research made by women, while also identifying areas where the profession needs to continue to grow to be more inclusive in the promotion of women scientific innovators.
Only eat oysters in months with an 'r'? Rule of thumb is at least 4,000 years old
Foodie tradition dictates only eating wild oysters during months containing the letter 'r' -- from September to April.
A wirelessly-controlled and wearable skin-integrated haptic VR device
Sensing a hug from your friend through a video call with him/her may become a reality soon.
3D maps of gene activity
A three-dimensional computer model enables scientists to quickly determine which genes are active in which cells, and their precise location within an organ.
Researchers design an improved pathway to carbon-neutral plastics
Researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and Caltech have designed a new and improved system for efficiently converting CO2, water, and renewable energy into ethylene -- the precursor to a wide range of plastic products -- under neutral conditions.
Are hiring algorithms fair? They're too opaque to tell, study finds
New research from a team of Computing and Information Science scholars at Cornell University raises questions about hiring algorithms and the tech companies who develop and use them: How unbiased is the automated screening process?
New water-based optical device revolutionizes the field of optics research
Using the optical properties of a material to manipulate light signals is called light modulation, a method widely used in optical communication.
Melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants
Recent research published in Phytobiomes Journal demonstrates that melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants, which has been shown to be protective for many different organisms.
Successful study of Swedish vaccine candidate against diarrhea
University of Gothenburg reports first successful results of the oral, inactivated vaccine candidate ETVAX against enterotoxigenic E. coli diarrhea in a placebo-controlled phase I/II study in infants and children from 6 months to 5 years of age in Bangladesh.
Experimental HIV vaccine successfully elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies to the virus
An experimental HIV vaccine developed by scientists at Scripps Research and the nonprofit vaccine research organization IAVI has reached an important milestone by eliciting antibodies that can neutralize a wide variety of HIV strains.
NASA tracks typhoon Kalmaegi affecting northern Philippines
NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Typhoon Kalmaegi as it moved into the Luzon Strait and continued to affect the northern Philippines.
Emissions from electricity generation lead to premature deaths for some racial groups
University of Washington researchers have found that air pollution from electricity generation emissions in 2014 led to about 16,000 premature deaths in the continental US.
Turning up the heat to create new nanostructured metals
The metallic thin films with 3-D interlocking nanostructures could be used in catalysis, energy storage, and biomedical sensing.
Clay as a feed supplement in dairy cattle has multiple benefits
Dairy producers frequently add clay as a feed supplement to reduce the symptoms of aflatoxin and subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in lactating cows.
Living in ethnic enclaves may improve pregnancy outcomes for Asian/Pacific islanders
Among Asian/Pacific Islander women living in the United States, those who reside in ethnic enclaves--areas with a high concentration of residents of a similar ancestry--are less likely to have pregnancy or birth complications than those living in other areas, suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.
Scientists developed a method for studying the structure of self-organizing materials
An international group of scientists with IKBFU professor Anatoliy Snigirev among them has published an article that proposes a new method for studying the structure of complexly organized materials of both artificial and natural origin.
The cause of chewy chicken meat
The most delicious-looking broiler chicken could consist of hard, chewy meat.
Wind more effective than cold air at cooling rooms naturally
The effectiveness of non-mechanical, low-energy methods for moderating temperature and humidity has been evaluated in a series of experiments by researchers from the University of Cambridge.
Gamma-ray bursts with record energy
The strongest explosions in the universe produce even more energetic radiation than previously known: Using specialised telescopes, two international teams have registered the highest energy gamma rays ever measured from so-called gamma-ray bursts, reaching about 100 billion times as much energy as visible light.
Musicians at serious risk of tinnitus, researchers show
People working in the music industry are nearly twice as likely to develop tinnitus as people working in quieter occupations, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Manchester.
BrainStorm Cell Tx publishes NurOwn ALS Phase 2 randomized trial data in neurology
Results from Brainstorm Cell Therapeutic's NurOwn randomized Phase 2 clinical trial were published in Neurology.
Researchers identify a molecular mechanism involved in Huntington's disease
Researchers from the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) described a mechanism, the increase of proteinaceous synthesis, which takes part in the degeneration of the type of neurons that are affected in Huntington's disease, a genetic neurodegenerative disease.
Researchers identify new gene mutation in familial thyroid cancers
Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine identified a new gene mutation that may cause a type of familial thyroid cancer.
A new link between migraines, opioid overuse may be key to treating pain
Researchers have discovered that a peptide links together migraine pain and pain induced by opioid overuse.
Faith community events for children: Good for the soul but lack nutrition
Most faith-based and private schools and associated afterschool programs operate independently without dietary requirements.
'Epidermal VR' gives technology a human touch
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new thin, wireless system that adds a sense of touch to any virtual reality (VR) experience.
Predicting treatment outcome for leishmaniasis
The current first-line treatment for leishmaniasis, a skin disease that can cause disfiguring ulcers, is grueling and frequently fails.
Want more women & minorities in STEM? Address social oppression in the classroom, says new research
Study shows a community college program that integrates students' experiences of social oppression into the class as students' develop social entrepreneurship ventures was effective at strengthening entrepreneurial and STEM skills of the students?largely women, minorities and immigrants
Survey finds 1 in 3 patients needed more information on cancer treatment side effects
One in three adults treated for cancer may experience side effects from treatment they wish they had known more about, according to a new survey published in the Journal of Oncology Practice.
Ensembling improves machine learning model performance
Ensembles created using models submitted to the RSNA Pediatric Bone Age Machine Learning Challenge convincingly outperformed single-model prediction of bone age, according to a study.
Could sphingolipids help solve a racial paradox in heart disease?
For white patients, lipid test results showing high HDL cholesterol and low LDL cholesterol and triglycerides would be good news, suggesting a lower risk for heart disease.
Breast cancer recurrence score has different implications for men
A new study by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) researchers published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, indicates that a lower threshold is needed for male patients to predict mortality using the genetic assay, Oncotype DX®, a commercial diagnostic test.
Machine, meet stem cells
Scientists at Gladstone Institutes, in collaboration with researchers at Boston University, have used a computational model to learn how to coax stem cells into forming new arrangements, including those that might eventually be useful in generating personalized organs.
First detection of gamma-ray burst afterglow in very-high-energy gamma light
An international team of researchers observe a gamma-ray burst, an extremely energetic flash following a cosmological cataclysm, emitting very-high-energy gamma-rays long after the initial explosion.
Academics call for targeted healthcare for pregnant women and new mums with depression
Pregnant women and new mothers who experience depression need improved healthcare say academics.
Exposure to PM 2.5 pollution linked to brain atrophy, memory decline
Women in their 70s and 80s who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution experienced greater declines in memory and more Alzheimer's-like brain atrophy than their counterparts who breathed cleaner air.
A decade after the predators have gone, Galapagos Island finches are still being spooked
On some of the Galapagos Islands where human-introduced predators of Darwin's finches were eradicated over a decade ago, the finches are still acting as though they are in danger, according to research published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology.
Energy research -- Economizing on iridium
Iridium is an ideal catalyst for the electrolytic production of hydrogen from water -- but it is extremely expensive.
'Self-cleaning' concrete could keep buildings looking new (video)
Building materials that clean themselves could save immense time and labor in homes and businesses, as well as reduce disease risk in settings such as hospitals.
HKUST researchers shed light on modulation of thermal bleaching of coral reefs by internal waves
An international research team led by an ocean scientist from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has demonstrated in a recent research paper the cooling impact of internal waves across depths on coral reefs, which has the potential to create thermal refuges for corals and is important for making more accurate predictions of coral bleaching.
Asking if behavior can be changed on climate crisis
One of the more complex problems facing social psychologists today is whether any intervention can move people to change their behavior about climate change and protecting the environment for the sake of future generations.
Severe pregnancy-related depression may be rooted in inflammation
A runaway, inflammatory immune response may be responsible for triggering severe depression during and after pregnancy, according to a new study published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity.
Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies
Researchers from KU Leuven have found that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees.
Best of the best: Who makes the most accurate decisions in expert groups?
New method predicts accuracy on the basis of similarity.
Legumes boost heart health, according to new review study
Consuming beans, lentils, peas, and other legumes reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and high blood pressure, according to a review published in Advances in Nutrition.
The ever-changing brain: Shining a light on synaptic plasticity
Researchers in the Membrane Cooperativity Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) in Japan, in collaboration with researchers from universities across Japan, have found that AMPA receptors form and disintegrate continually, within a fraction of a second, rather than existing as stable entities.
Virtual and mixed reality inferior to traditional learning in anatomy education
The McMaster study compared an MR model (Microsoft HoloLens) and a VR model (HTC VIVE) derived from a physical model to the actual model.
Hubble studies gamma-ray burst with highest energy ever seen
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has given astronomers a peek at the location of the most energetic outburst ever seen in the universe -- a blast of gamma-rays a trillion times more powerful than visible light.
How people trick themselves into thinking something is heavier than it really is
In a recent study published in PLOS One researchers from Hiroshima University and Nagoya Institute of Technology found that if you hold your car steering wheel at certain angles (1, 4, or 5 on the clock) then it's likely you're over or underestimating how much force you need to use to steer the car.
Researchers find long-term benefits of nurse home visits for new mothers and infants
Home visits by nurses to check on infants and first-time mothers offer learning benefits for the children and savings in the cost of public welfare programs, according to new research published in December 2019 issue of the journal Pediatrics.
Vanishing ice puts reindeer herders at risk
Mongolia's Tsaatan reindeer herders depend on munkh mus, or eternal ice, for their livelihoods.
WSU genetic discovery holds implications for better immunity, longer life
Wrinkles on the skin of a microscopic worm might provide the key to a longer, healthier life for humans.
Walking changes vision
When people walk around, they process visual information differently than at rest: the peripheral visual field shows enhanced processing.
Bot can beat humans in multiplayer hidden-role games
MIT researchers have developed a bot equipped with artificial intelligence that can beat human players in tricky online multiplayer games where player roles and motives are kept secret.
To navigate, flies make flexible mental maps of the world
Flies use visual cues to finesse their mental maps of the environment.
Team led by institute for basic research scientist publishes findings on TAF1 syndrome
An international research team led by Dr. Gholson Lyon of the New York State Office for People With Developmental Disabilities' Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities announced publication in Human Mutation of findings from its study of the rare disease TAF1 syndrome.
Small rise in heart attack protein linked to increased risk of early death in all age groups
A new analysis of patients' heart data has shown that even a slight increase in a protein linked to heart attacks, called troponin, is linked to an increased risk of early death at all ages.
Vicious circles: Ring-shaped DNA provides cancer cells with a malignant twist
UC San Diego researchers describe how circular extrachromosomal DNA in cancer cells boosts aggressiveness and resistance to therapies.
Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish
Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows.
Li-ion battery components to be printed on an inkjet printer
Scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) are developing a technology for printing the electrodes for miniature li-ion batteries by an inkjet printer.
New IOF-ESCEO position paper offers practical guidance for osteoporosis management
The position paper summarizes the 2018 'European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women' in an international setting, with a focus on the categorisation of risk as a strategy to target therapeutic interventions.
Carnegie Mellon system locates shooters using smartphone video
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a system that can accurately locate a shooter based on video recordings from as few as three smartphones.
Making tiny antennas for wearable electronics
When it comes to electronics, bigger usually isn't better. This is especially true for a new generation of wearable communication systems that promise to connect people, machines and other objects in a wireless 'internet of things.' To make the devices small and comfortable enough to wear, scientists need to miniaturize their components.
Researchers discover molecular light switch in photoreceptor cells
Transducin, a protein found inside photoreceptor cells in vertebrate eyes, alters its cellular location in response to changes in light intensity, allowing our eyes to adapt to the changes.
Smart buildings face challenges but have plenty of potential
Mohamed Ouf and his co-authors examine the concepts of occupant-centric control in the burgeoning field of smart buildings.
Researchers visualize bacteria motor in first step toward human-produced electrical energy
Humans, one day, may be able to produce their own electrical energy in the same way electric eels do, according to a research team based in Japan.
Government integrity holds key to tackling corporate corruption -- study
Government leaders must set a good example to the business community if they want to eliminate corporate corruption, a new study reveals.
How do gliomas evolve?
The Glioma Longitudinal Analysis (GLASS) Consortium characterized diffuse glioma cells both before and after therapy to characterize how they change and why this form of malignant brain cancer is so difficult to treat.
Would people be willing to give their personal data for research?
New research led by the University of Bristol has found that over half of people would be willing to donate their personal data for research to benefit the wider general public.
Outback telescope captures Milky Way center, discovers remnants of dead stars
A radio telescope in the Western Australian outback has captured a spectacular new view of the centre of the galaxy in which we live, the Milky Way.
NASA observes tropical storm Fung-Wong organize
As Tropical Depression 28W continued organizing and developing into Tropical Storm Fung-Wong in the Philippine Sea, NASA's Aqua satellite provided data on the storm to forecasters.
How the brain detects the rhythms of speech
Neuroscientists at UC San Francisco have discovered how the listening brain scans speech to break it down into syllables.
Photoinitiators detected in human breast milk
Photoinitators (PIs) are compounds used in the ink of many types of food packaging.
New fossils shed light on how snakes got their bite and lost their legs
New fossils of an ancient legged snake, called Najash, shed light on the origin of the slithering reptiles.
Caught in the act: MeerKAT telescope spies stellar flare
The MeerKAT radio telescope in the Northern Cape of South Africa has discovered an object which rapidly brightened by more than a factor of three over a period of three weeks.
Behavioral sciences in the promotion of oral health
The importance and value of behavioral sciences in dentistry has long been recognized and over time behavioral sciences have expanded our understanding of oral health beyond 'disease' to a broader biopsychosocial concept of oral health.
Scientists find promising drug combination against lethal childhood brain cancers
Researchers have devised a new, promising plan of attack against deadly childhood brain cancers called diffuse midline gliomas (DMG).
Some hyper-realistic masks more believable than human faces, study suggests
In a study by the universities of York and Kyoto, researchers asked participants to look at pairs of photographs and decide which showed a normal face and which showed a person wearing a mask.
Suicides reduced by 17 per cent in new collaborative prevention programme
A new suicide prevention programme which includes swift access to specialist care and 12 months of telephone follow-ups has shown to reduce deaths by 17 per cent.
4D imaging with liquid crystal microlenses
Most images captured by a camera lens are flat and two dimensional.
Icebergs as a source of nutrients
The importance of icebergs as an important source of nutrients in the polar regions has long been discussed.
Dog and sheep bones help injured pigeons fly again
Sheep and dog bones can be whittled into orthopedic pins that stabilize pigeons' fractured wings, helping the fractures to heal properly without follow-up surgery.
Artyom Yurov, IKBFU physicist: 'Can quantum effects occur at mega-scale?'
Quantum physics is, perhaps, the most amazing phenomenon known to people.
Many patients with anorexia nervosa get better, but complete recovery elusive to most
Three in four patients with anorexia nervosa -- including many with challenging illness -- make a partial recovery.
How plants handle stress
Plants get stressed too. Drought or too much salt disrupt their physiology.
Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis
Engineers at Duke University have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal settings needed to complete a given diagnostic task.
The tera from outer space
Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic phenomenon known to humankind.
Gunshot survivors report long-term physical, mental consequences
Survivors of gunshot wounds reported negative outcomes years after being shot in this observational study.
Designer lens helps see the big picture
An innovative optical component and a reconstruction algorithm provide more detailed images.
Non-invasive microscopy detects activation state and distinguishes between cell types
Most analytical methods in biology require invasive procedures to analyze samples, which leads to irreversible changes or even their destruction.
Researchers develop new database of druggable fusion targets
By analyzing over a million nucleic acid sequences from publicly available data, a team of researchers has identified 111,582 fusions in eight species (human, mouse, rat, fruit-fly, wild boar, zebrafish, yeast and cattle).
A super-fast 'light switch' for future cars and computers
Switching light beams quickly is important in many technological applications.
Study offers first large-sample evidence of the effect of ethics training on financial sector
New research from Notre Dame offers the first large-sample study on how rules and ethics training affects behavior and employment decisions in the financial sector.

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